Reference : Experimenter Effects in Children Using the Smileyometer Scale
Scientific congresses, symposiums and conference proceedings : Unpublished conference
Social & behavioral sciences, psychology : Multidisciplinary, general & others
Educational Sciences
http://hdl.handle.net/10993/45447
Experimenter Effects in Children Using the Smileyometer Scale
English
Lehnert, Florence Kristin mailto [University of Luxembourg > Faculty of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences (FHSE) > Department of Behavioural and Cognitive Sciences (DBCS) >]
Lallemand, Carine mailto [University of Luxembourg > Faculty of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences (FHSE) > Department of Behavioural and Cognitive Sciences (DBCS) > ; Eindhoven University of Technology > Industrial Design]
Fischbach, Antoine mailto [University of Luxembourg > Faculty of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences (FHSE) > Department of Education and Social Work (DESW) >]
Koenig, Vincent mailto [University of Luxembourg > Faculty of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences (FHSE) > Department of Behavioural and Cognitive Sciences (DBCS) >]
19-Nov-2020
Yes
National
PhD conference in Social Science Conference
19-11-2020
Luxembourg
[en] experimenter effect ; user experience ; assessment
[en] Researchers in the social sciences like human-computer interaction face novel challenges concerning the development of methods and tools for evaluating interactive technology with children. One of these challenges is related to the validity and reliability of user experience measurement tools. Scale designs, like the Smileyometer, have been proven to contain biases such as the tendency for children to rate almost every technology as great. This explorative paper discusses a possible effect of two experimenter styles on the distribution of 6-8 years old pupils' ratings (N= 73) to the Smileyometer. We administered the scale before and after a tablet-based assessment in two schools. Experimenter 1 employed a child-directed speech compared to a monotone speech of Experimenter 2. While brilliant (5 out of 5) was the most frequent answer option in all conditions, the mean scores were higher and associated with a lower variability across both conditions for Experimenter 2. We discuss a possible experimenter effect in the Smileyometer and implications for evaluating children’s user experiences.
Researchers
http://hdl.handle.net/10993/45447

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