Reference : The very long arm of wealth: Effects of intergenerational wealth resources on health ...
E-prints/Working papers : First made available on ORBilu
Social & behavioral sciences, psychology : Sociology & social sciences
http://hdl.handle.net/10993/52007
The very long arm of wealth: Effects of intergenerational wealth resources on health in the U.S. over the last three decades
English
Chauvel, Louis mailto [University of Luxembourg > Faculty of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences (FHSE) > Department of Social Sciences (DSOC) >]
Ceron, Francisco mailto [University of Luxembourg > Faculty of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences (FHSE) > Department of Social Sciences (DSOC) >]
Murphy, Emily mailto [University of Luxembourg > Faculty of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences (FHSE) > Department of Social Sciences (DSOC) >]
Settels, Jason mailto [University of Luxembourg > Faculty of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences (FHSE) > Department of Social Sciences (DSOC) >]
28-Feb-2021
IRSEI
30
Yes
Esch-sur-Alzette
Luxembourg
[en] Self-assessed health ; inequality ; wealth ; intergenerational social advantage ; mixed models
[en] Health inequalities result from multidimensional socioeconomic inequalities (income, education, wealth, etc.). Given the specific size and greater stability through time of wealth than income, wealth might affect health beyond other socioeconomic indicators. An important question is how far the reach of wealth is on one’s health: Does wealth promote health even over generations? Using the Panel Study of Income Dynamics (PSID), we consider the effects of intergenerational and intragenerational wealth on age-adjusted self-assessed health (ASAH) across the life course. We find that both parental and personal household wealth strongly affect ASAH net of other socioeconomic measures. Just as social disadvantages have been shown to be inherited between generations, so too are wealth-induced health advantages. Furthermore, the inter- and intra- generational wealth effects on health increase over the life course. This study thus encourages social scientists to pay greater attention to wealth inequalities, despite difficulties in their accurate measurement.
Researchers
http://hdl.handle.net/10993/52007
http://www.ecineq.org/wp-content/uploads/papers_EcineqLSE/EcineqLSE-242.pdf
Presented at international conferences IV ISA Forum of Sociology, Porto Alegre, Brazil (online), February 2021 and at the Ninth ECINEQ Meeting, London, UK, July 2021

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