Reference : Cognitive distraction from pain: An fMRI study on the role of age and executive functions
Scientific congresses, symposiums and conference proceedings : Unpublished conference
Social & behavioral sciences, psychology : Neurosciences & behavior
http://hdl.handle.net/10993/49884
Cognitive distraction from pain: An fMRI study on the role of age and executive functions
English
Rischer, Katharina Miriam mailto [University of Luxembourg > Faculty of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences (FHSE) > Department of Behavioural and Cognitive Sciences (DBCS)]
Dierolf, Angelika mailto [University of Luxembourg > Faculty of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences (FHSE) > Department of Behavioural and Cognitive Sciences (DBCS)]
González-Roldán, Ana M. mailto [University of the Balearic Islands > Research Institute of Health Sciences - IUNICS]
Montoya, Pedro mailto [University of the Balearics Islands > Research Institute of Health Sciences - IUNICS]
Anton, Fernand mailto [University of Luxembourg > Faculty of Language and Literature, Humanities, Arts and Education (FLSHASE) > Integrative Research Unit: Social and Individual Development (INSIDE)]
van der Meulen, Marian mailto [University of Luxembourg > Faculty of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences (FHSE) > Department of Behavioural and Cognitive Sciences (DBCS)]
Jun-2021
Yes
International
46. Jahrestagung Psychologie und Gehirn
02-06-2021 to 04-06-2021
Germany
[en] aging ; cognitive pain modulation ; fMRI
[en] Completing a cognitive task has been shown to be a powerful strategy to reduce concurrent pain.
This reduction in pain is assumed to result from a competition between the painful stimulus and the distractive task for attentional and executive resources mediated by the prefrontal cortex (PFC), a region that is particularly affected by age-related grey matter atrophy. In the present study, we investigated the role of age-related changes in gray matter volume and executive functions in modulating the efficacy of distraction from pain.

In a first session, young and older adults completed a battery of neuropsychological tests. In a second session, we acquired functional brain images while participants completed a working memory task with two levels of cognitive load (low vs. high load) and concurrently received individually adjusted heat stimuli (innocuous vs. painful) to their lower arm.

While we found no age-related differences in the distraction effect size on the behavioural level, young adults showed a larger neural distraction effect in several regions involved in pain processing, including the insula, caudate and midcingulate cortex. Interestingly, older adults with better executive functions, particularly, better inhibitory control abilities, showed a larger neural distraction effect in the insula, thalamus and primary somatosensory cortex, and more activation in frontal clusters during the high load task.

Taken together, these findings suggest that age alters the neural mechanisms underlying cognitive distraction from pain, and that the magnitude of these changes may be dependent on the preservation of executive functions.
Fonds National de la Recherche - FnR
Researchers
http://hdl.handle.net/10993/49884
FnR ; FNR11266318 > Marian Van Der Meulen > ACHE > Age-related Changes In Human Pain Perception And Modulation: Evidence From Functional Brain Imaging > 01/09/2017 > 31/08/2020 > 2016

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