Reference : Canonical representations of fingers and dots trigger an automatic activation of numb...
Scientific journals : Article
Social & behavioral sciences, psychology : Neurosciences & behavior
http://hdl.handle.net/10993/49039
Canonical representations of fingers and dots trigger an automatic activation of number semantics: an EEG study on 10-year-old children
English
Marlair, Cathy mailto [Université Catholique de Louvain - UCL > IPSY]
Lochy, Aliette mailto [University of Luxembourg > Faculty of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences (FHSE) > Department of Behavioural and Cognitive Sciences (DBCS) >]
Buyle, Margot mailto [Université Catholique de Louvain - UCL > IPSY]
Schiltz, Christine mailto [University of Luxembourg > Faculty of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences (FHSE) > Department of Behavioural and Cognitive Sciences (DBCS) >]
Crollen, Virginie mailto [Université Catholique de Louvain - UCL > IPSY]
Apr-2021
Neuropsychologia
Elsevier
Yes (verified by ORBilu)
International
0028-3932
1873-3514
Oxford
United Kingdom
[en] EEG) ; Canonical representations ; Fingers ; dots ; Frequency tagging ; Number semantics
[en] Over the course of development, children must learn to map a non-symbolic representation of magnitude to a more precise symbolic system. There is solid evidence that finger and dot representations can facilitate or even predict the acquisition of this mapping skill. While several behavioral studies demonstrated that canonical representations of fingers and dots automatically activate number semantics, no study so far has investigated their cerebral basis. To examine these questions, 10-year-old children were presented a behavioral naming task and a Fast Periodic Visual Stimulation EEG paradigm. In the behavioral task, children had to name as fast and as accurately as possible the numbers of dots and fingers presented in canonical and non-canonical configurations. In the EEG experiment, one category of stimuli (e.g., canonical representation of fingers or dots) was periodically inserted (1/5) in streams of another category (e.g., non-canonical representation of fingers or dots) presented at a fast rate (4 Hz). Results demonstrated an automatic access to number semantics and bilateral categorical responses at 4 Hz/5 for canonical representations of fingers and dots. Some differences between finger and dot configuration’s processing were nevertheless observed and are discussed in light of an effortful-automatic continuum hypothesis.
http://hdl.handle.net/10993/49039
10.1016/j.neuropsychologia.2021.107874

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