Reference : Does Conscientiousness Matter for Academic Success? Considering Different Facets of C...
Scientific congresses, symposiums and conference proceedings : Poster
Social & behavioral sciences, psychology : Education & instruction
Educational Sciences
http://hdl.handle.net/10993/43772
Does Conscientiousness Matter for Academic Success? Considering Different Facets of Conscientiousness and Different Educational Outcomes
English
Franzen, Patrick mailto [University of Luxembourg > Faculty of Language and Literature, Humanities, Arts and Education (FLSHASE) > Education, Culture, Cognition and Society (ECCS) >]
van der Westhuizen, Lindie mailto [University of Luxembourg > Faculty of Language and Literature, Humanities, Arts and Education (FLSHASE) > Education, Culture, Cognition and Society (ECCS) >]
Arens, A. Katrin mailto [Deutsches Institut für Internationale Pädagogische Forschung]
Fischbach, Antoine mailto [University of Luxembourg > Faculty of Language and Literature, Humanities, Arts and Education (FLSHASE) > Luxembourg Centre for Educational Testing (LUCET) >]
Niepel, Christoph mailto [University of Luxembourg > Faculty of Language and Literature, Humanities, Arts and Education (FLSHASE) > Education, Culture, Cognition and Society (ECCS) >]
Apr-2020
Yes
International
AERA Annual Meeting
17-21 April
American Educational Research Association
San Francisco, CA
USA
[en] conscientiousness ; academic success ; student engagement ; achievement ; school satisfaction ; GPA
[en] Conscientiousness is the strongest BIG-5 predictor of academic success. Both conscientiousness and academic success are broad concepts, consisting of multiple lower level facets. Conscientiousness facets might display differential relations to different indicators of academic success. To investigate these relations, conscientiousness facets need to be measured in an economic and valid way. We conducted two studies, validating a short conscientiousness scale measuring seven facets of conscientiousness (Industriousness, Task Planning, Perfectionism, Procrastination Refrainment, Tidiness, Control, Cautiousness), and testing the relations of these facets with GPA, test scores, school satisfaction, and engagement. The results supported the validity of the scale. Industriousness, Perfectionism, and Cautiousness revealed the highest relations to academic outcomes. GPA and test scores showed differential associations with the different conscientiousness facets.
University of Luxembourg - UL
Researchers ; Professionals ; Students ; General public
http://hdl.handle.net/10993/43772
http://tinyurl.com/w2u2ebr

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