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Gender differences in risk factors for suicidal behaviours in adolescents
van Duin, Claire; Catunda, Carolina; Heinz, Andreas et al.
2018Excellence in Pediatrics - 10th Edition
 

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Keywords :
Suicidal ideation; Gender difference; Adolescence
Abstract :
[en] Introduction: As the second leading cause of death among young people suicide is a severe public health problem. Previous studies have indicated that risk factors for suicidal behaviours differ for males and females, although it remains uncertain whether gender predicts suicidal behaviors. The 2014 HBSC study in Luxembourg has gathered data on the suicidal ideation sequence in adolescents and can contribute to these issues. Purpose: The objective of this study was to examine gender differences within the risk factors for suicidal behaviours within the adolescent population of Luxembourg. Materials and Methods: Data on suicidal ideation among adolescents was collected through written survey. Data from secondary school students aged 12 to 18 was used (N=5595). Bivariate logistic regressions were conducted in order to identify risk factors for the dependent variables of “sadness”, “considering suicide”, “planning suicide” and “suicide attempt” in the last twelve months. Subsequently, multivariate logistic regressions were performed split by gender. 24 independent variables were included in the models. Results: The three significant variables that added most to the models for “sadness” and “suicide attempt” are named. For boys, the odds for sadness were impacted by the number of health complaints (OR: 1.4 for each additional health complaint; CI: 1.4-1.6), life satisfaction (OR: 1.2 for each additional unit; CI: 1.2-1.3) and body image (OR: 1.6 for too thin; CI: 1.1-2.3; OR: 1.7 for too fat; CI: 1.3-2.3). For girls, the variables were the number of health complaints (OR: 1.4; CI: 1.3-1.4), life satisfaction (OR: 1.3; CI: 1.2-1.4) and sexual abuse (OR: 2.5; CI: 2.0-3.1). Considering suicide attempts, for boys the odds were impacted by the physical fighting (OR: 2.9 for 4 fights or more; CI: 1.5-5.5), life satisfaction (OR: 1.2; CI: 1.3-2.1) and substance use (OR: 1.7; CI: 1.3-2.1). For girls, the number of health complaints (OR: 1.3, CI: 1.2-1.4), life satisfaction (OR: 1.3; CI: 1.2-1.4) and type of school (OR: 3.7 for secondary technique; CI: 2.1-5.0) impacted the odds. Conclusion: This study has indicated that differences in risk factors between the genders increase as the severity of suicidal behavior increases. This highlights the need for distinct strategies for the prevention of suicide behaviours that are suitable for the different genders, and their respective risk factors.
Disciplines :
Pediatrics
Author, co-author :
van Duin, Claire ;  University of Luxembourg > Faculty of Language and Literature, Humanities, Arts and Education (FLSHASE) > Integrative Research Unit: Social and Individual Development (INSIDE)
Catunda, Carolina ;  University of Luxembourg > Faculty of Language and Literature, Humanities, Arts and Education (FLSHASE) > Integrative Research Unit: Social and Individual Development (INSIDE)
Heinz, Andreas ;  University of Luxembourg > Faculty of Language and Literature, Humanities, Arts and Education (FLSHASE) > Integrative Research Unit: Social and Individual Development (INSIDE)
Willems, Helmut ;  University of Luxembourg > Faculty of Language and Literature, Humanities, Arts and Education (FLSHASE) > Integrative Research Unit: Social and Individual Development (INSIDE)
External co-authors :
no
Language :
English
Title :
Gender differences in risk factors for suicidal behaviours in adolescents
Publication date :
07 December 2018
Event name :
Excellence in Pediatrics - 10th Edition
Event date :
from 6-12-2018 to 8-12-2018
Audience :
International
Available on ORBilu :
since 17 December 2018

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