Article (Scientific journals)
Colonization and Succession within the Human Gut Microbiome by Archaea, Bacteria, and Microeukaryotes during the First Year of Life
Wampach, Linda; Heintz, Anna; Hogan, Angela et al.
2017In Frontiers in Microbiology
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Copyright © 2017 Wampach, Heintz-Buschart, Hogan, Muller, Narayanasamy, Laczny, Hugerth, Bindl, Bottu, Andersson, de Beaufort and Wilmes. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (CC BY). The use, distribution or reproduction in other forums is permitted, provided the original author(s) or licensor are credited and that the original publication in this journal is cited, in accordance with accepted academic practice. No use, distribution or reproduction is permitted which does not comply with these terms.


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Keywords :
fungi; succession; delivery mode; infant gut microbiome; amplicon sequencing; microbial colonization; quantitative real-time PCR
Abstract :
[en] Perturbations to the colonization process of the human gastrointestinal tract have been suggested to result in adverse health effects later in life. Although much research has been performed on bacterial colonization and succession, much less is known about the other two domains of life, archaea, and eukaryotes. Here we describe colonization and succession by bacteria, archaea and microeukaryotes during the first year of life (samples collected around days 1, 3, 5, 28, 150, and 365) within the gastrointestinal tract of infants delivered either vaginally or by cesarean section and using a combination of quantitative real-time PCR as well as 16S and 18S rRNA gene amplicon sequencing. Sequences from organisms belonging to all three domains of life were detectable in all of the collected meconium samples. The microeukaryotic community composition fluctuated strongly over time and early diversification was delayed in infants receiving formula milk. Cesarean section-delivered (CSD) infants experienced a delay in colonization and succession, which was observed for all three domains of life. Shifts in prokaryotic succession in CSD infants compared to vaginally delivered (VD) infants were apparent as early as days 3 and 5, which were characterized by increased relative abundances of the genera Streptococcus and Staphylococcus, and a decrease in relative abundance for the genera Bifidobacterium and Bacteroides. Generally, a depletion in Bacteroidetes was detected as early as day 5 postpartum in CSD infants, causing a significantly increased Firmicutes/Bacteroidetes ratio between days 5 and 150 when compared to VD infants. Although the delivery mode appeared to have the strongest influence on differences between the infants, other factors such as a younger gestational age or maternal antibiotics intake likely contributed to the observed patterns as well. Our findings complement previous observations of a delay in colonization and succession of CSD infants, which affects not only bacteria but also archaea and microeukaryotes. This further highlights the need for resolving bacterial, archaeal, and microeukaryotic dynamics in future longitudinal studies of microbial colonization and succession within the neonatal gastrointestinal tract.
Research center :
- Luxembourg Centre for Systems Biomedicine (LCSB): Eco-Systems Biology (Wilmes Group)
IBBL - Integrated BioBank of Luxembourg
Science for Life Laboratory
Centre Hospitalier de Luxembourg
Disciplines :
Microbiology
Author, co-author :
Wampach, Linda ;  University of Luxembourg > Luxembourg Centre for Systems Biomedicine (LCSB)
Heintz, Anna ;  University of Luxembourg > Luxembourg Centre for Systems Biomedicine (LCSB)
Hogan, Angela;  Integrated BioBank of Luxembourg
Muller, Emilie ;  University of Luxembourg > Luxembourg Centre for Systems Biomedicine (LCSB)
Narayanasamy, Shaman ;  University of Luxembourg > Luxembourg Centre for Systems Biomedicine (LCSB)
Laczny, Cedric Christian  ;  University of Luxembourg > Luxembourg Centre for Systems Biomedicine (LCSB)
Hugerth, Luisa;  KTH Royal Institute of Technology > Science for Life Laboratory > School of Biotechnology - Division of Gene Technology
Bindl, Lutz;  Centre Hospitalier de Luxembourg
Bottu, Jean;  Centre Hospitalier de Luxembourg
Andersson, Anders;  KTH Royal Institute of Technology > Science for Life Laboratory > School of Biotechnology - Division of Gene Technology
de Beaufort, Carine ;  University of Luxembourg > Luxembourg Centre for Systems Biomedicine (LCSB)
Wilmes, Paul ;  University of Luxembourg > Luxembourg Centre for Systems Biomedicine (LCSB)
External co-authors :
yes
Language :
English
Title :
Colonization and Succession within the Human Gut Microbiome by Archaea, Bacteria, and Microeukaryotes during the First Year of Life
Publication date :
May 2017
Journal title :
Frontiers in Microbiology
ISSN :
1664-302X
Publisher :
Frontiers Research Foundation, Lausanne, Switzerland
Special issue title :
Infant Gut Microbiota Colonization and Food Impact
Peer reviewed :
Peer Reviewed verified by ORBi
Focus Area :
Systems Biomedicine
FnR Project :
FNR5824125 - Colonisation, Succession And Evolution Of The Human Gastrointestinal Microbiome In Infants At High Risk Of Metabolic Disease In Adulthood, 2013 (01/10/2013-17/02/2018) - Linda Belardi-wampach
Name of the research project :
Cosmic
Funders :
FNR - Fonds National de la Recherche [LU]
Integrated BioBank of Luxembourg
Fondation André et Henriette Losch
Swedish Research Council VR
Available on ORBilu :
since 02 June 2017

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