Reference : Mobility among older adults: Deconstructing the effects of motility and movement on w...
Scientific journals : Article
Social & behavioral sciences, psychology : Human geography & demography
Human health sciences : Multidisciplinary, general & others
http://hdl.handle.net/10993/40391
Mobility among older adults: Deconstructing the effects of motility and movement on wellbeing
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Cuignet, T. [Université du Luxembourg, Luxembourg, Luxembourg Institute of Socio-Economic Research, Luxembourg]
Perchoux, C. [Luxembourg Institute of Socio-Economic Research, Urban Development and Mobility, Luxembourg]
Caruso, Geoffrey mailto [University of Luxembourg > Faculty of Language and Literature, Humanities, Arts and Education (FLSHASE) > Identités, Politiques, Sociétés, Espaces (IPSE)]
Klein, O. [Luxembourg Institute of Socio-Economic Research, Urban Development and Mobility, Luxembourg]
Klein, S. [Luxembourg Institute of Socio-Economic Research, Urban Development and Mobility, Luxembourg]
Chaix, B. [Sorbonne Université, INSERM, Institut Pierre Louis d’Épidémiologie et de Santé Publique, Nemesis Research Team, France]
Kestens, Y. [École de Santé Publique de l, Université de Montréal, Département de Médecine Sociale et Préventive, Canada]
Gerber, P. [Luxembourg Institute of Socio-Economic Research, Urban Development and Mobility, Luxembourg]
2019
Urban Studies
SAGE Publications Ltd
Yes
International
00420980
[en] Daily mobility has been shown to contribute to the wellbeing of older adults, as it promotes healthy and independent living. However, very little is known about how the complex relationships between locations, geographic environments and daily mobility relate to wellbeing. In the current paper, we rely on the concept of ‘motility’– defined as potential mobility– and the concept of ‘movement’– defined as actual mobility– to take a step forwards in disentangling the relationship between mobility and wellbeing. We further examine how both motility and movement relate to two complementary definitions of wellbeing: hedonic wellbeing as a measurement of happiness, and eudaimonic wellbeing as the actualisation of an individual’s human potential. To investigate this relationship, we draw up a conceptual framework stressing pathways linking mobility to wellbeing, which we empirically test using structural equation modelling on a stratified sample of 470 older adults. We first quantitatively confirm that motility is defined by access, competences, appropriation and attitudes to modes of transportation. We then observe that motility has direct effects on eudaimonic wellbeing and, to a lesser extent, on hedonic wellbeing. Part of the motility effects on wellbeing are mediated by movement. Separating mobility into motility and movement stresses the independent and complementary role that potential and realised mobility play in shaping older adults’ wellbeing. © Urban Studies Journal Limited 2019.
http://hdl.handle.net/10993/40391
10.1177/0042098019852033

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