Reference : Neurotoxic amyloidogenic peptides in the proteome of SARS-COV2: potential implication...
Scientific journals : Article
Life sciences : Biochemistry, biophysics & molecular biology
Physics and Materials Science
http://hdl.handle.net/10993/51646
Neurotoxic amyloidogenic peptides in the proteome of SARS-COV2: potential implications for neurological symptoms in COVID-19
English
Charnley, Mirren [Swinburne University of Technology > Centre for Optical Sciences and Department of Health Sciences and Biostatistics > > ; Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre > Immune Signalling Laboratory]
Islam, Saba [La Trobe University > Department of Biochemistry & Chemistry]
Bindra, Guneet [La Trobe University > Department of Biochemistry & Chemistry]
Engwirda, Jeremy [La Trobe University > Department of Biochemistry & Chemistry]
Ratcliffe, Julian [La Trobe University Bioimaging Platform]
Zhou, Jingtao [ETH Zürich > Department of Health Sciences & Technology]
Mezzenga, Raffaele [ETH Zürich > Department of Health Sciences & Technology]
Hulett, Mark D. [La Trobe University > Department of Biochemistry & Chemistry]
Han, Kyunghoon mailto [University of Luxembourg > Faculty of Science, Technology and Medicine (FSTM) > Department of Physics and Materials Science (DPHYMS) >]
Berryman, Josh mailto [University of Luxembourg > Faculty of Science, Technology and Medicine (FSTM) > Department of Physics and Materials Science (DPHYMS) >]
Reynolds, Nicholas P. mailto [La Trobe University > Department of Biochemistry & Chemistry]
13-Jun-2022
Nature Communications
Nature Publishing Group
13
Yes
International
2041-1723
London
United Kingdom
[en] COVID-19 ; Amyloid ; Neurotoxin ; X-ray Scattering ; Fluorescent Microscopy ; Molecular Modelling ; Molecular Dynamics ; Spectroscopy ; Simulation ; Atomic Force Microscopy ; Transmission Electron Microscopy
[en] COVID-19 is primarily known as a respiratory disease caused by SARS-CoV-2. However, neurological symptoms such as memory loss, sensory confusion, severe headaches, and even stroke are reported in up to 30% of cases and can persist even after the infection is over (long COVID). These neurological symptoms are thought to be produced by the virus infecting the central nervous system, however we don’t understand the molecular mechanisms triggering them. The neurological effects of COVID-19 share similarities to neurodegenerative diseases in which the presence of cytotoxic aggregated amyloid protein or peptides is a common feature. Following the hypothesis that some neurological symptoms of COVID-19 may also follow an amyloid etiology we identified two peptides from the SARS-CoV-2 proteome that self-assemble into amyloid assemblies. Furthermore, these amyloids were shown to be highly toxic to neuronal cells. We suggest that cytotoxic aggregates of SARS-CoV-2 proteins may trigger neurological symptoms in COVID-19.
Researchers ; Professionals ; Students ; General public ; Others
http://hdl.handle.net/10993/51646
10.1038/s41467-022-30932-1
https://www.nature.com/articles/s41467-022-30932-1
FnR ; FNR14588607 > Joshua T Berryman > QUIRE > Quantum Infra Red Efficiently > 01/09/2021 > 31/08/2024 > 2020

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