Reference : Stable Electrospinning of Core-Functionalized Coaxial Fibers Enabled by the Minimum-E...
Scientific journals : Article
Engineering, computing & technology : Materials science & engineering
Physics and Materials Science
http://hdl.handle.net/10993/49402
Stable Electrospinning of Core-Functionalized Coaxial Fibers Enabled by the Minimum-Energy Interface Given by Partial Core− Sheath Miscibility
English
Vats, Shameek mailto [University of Luxembourg > Faculty of Science, Technology and Medicine (FSTM) > Department of Physics and Materials Science (DPHYMS) >]
Lagerwall, Jan mailto [University of Luxembourg > Faculty of Science, Technology and Medicine (FSTM) > Department of Physics and Materials Science (DPHYMS) >]
Anyfantakis, Emmanouil mailto [University of Luxembourg > Faculty of Science, Technology and Medicine (FSTM) > Department of Physics and Materials Science (DPHYMS) >]
4-Nov-2021
Langmuir
American Chemical Society
37
45
13265–13277
Yes (verified by ORBilu)
International
0743-7463
1520-5827
Washington
DC
[en] Core-sheath ; Interfacial tesion ; partial miscibility ; Liquid crystals ; Electrospinning
[en] Core−sheath electrospinning is a powerful tool for producing composite fibers with one or multiple encapsulated functional materials, but many material combinations are difficult or even impossible to spin together. We show that the key to success is to ensure a well-defined core−sheath interface while also maintaining a constant and minimal interfacial energy across this interface. Using a thermotropic liquid crystal as a model functional core and polyacrylic acid or styrene-butadiene-styrene block
copolymer as a sheath polymer, we study the effects of using water, ethanol, or tetrahydrofuran as polymer solvent. We find that the ideal core and sheath materials are partially miscible, with their
phase diagram exhibiting an inner miscibility gap. Complete immiscibility yields a relatively high interfacial tension that causes core breakup, even preventing the core from entering the fiber- producing jet, whereas the lack of a well-defined interface in the case of complete miscibility eliminates the core−sheath morphology, and it turns the core into a coagulation bath for the sheath solution, causing premature gelation in the Taylor cone. Moreover, to minimize Marangoni flows in the Taylor cone due to local interfacial tension variations, a small amount of the sheath solvent should be added to the core prior to spinning. Our findings resolve a long-standing confusion regarding guidelines for selecting core and sheath fluids in core−sheath electrospinning. These discoveries can be applied to many other material combinations than those studied here, enabling new functional composites of large interest and application potential.
http://hdl.handle.net/10993/49402

File(s) associated to this reference

Fulltext file(s):

FileCommentaryVersionSizeAccess
Open access
Published.pdfPublisher postprint12.78 MBView/Open
Open access
SI.pdfSI Publisher postprint494 kBView/Open

Additional material(s):

File Commentary Size Access
Open access
1_SI.zipSI Movies18.17 MBView/Open

Bookmark and Share SFX Query

All documents in ORBilu are protected by a user license.