Reference : Transnational soldiering, burial and commemoration across borders. The case of Luxemb...
Scientific journals : Article
Social & behavioral sciences, psychology : Human geography & demography
Arts & humanities : History
Migration and Inclusive Societies
http://hdl.handle.net/10993/48662
Transnational soldiering, burial and commemoration across borders. The case of Luxembourgers in the French Foreign Legion
English
Kolnberger, Thomas mailto [University of Luxembourg > Faculty of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences (FHSE) > Department of Geography and Spatial Planning (DGEO) >]
Kmec, Sonja mailto [University of Luxembourg > Faculty of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences (FHSE) > Department of Humanities (DHUM) >]
2022
Francia: Forschungen zur Westeuropäischen Geschichte. 3, 19./20. Jahrhundert
J. Thorbecke
49
xx-xx
Yes
International
0937-7751
Sigmaringen
Germany
[en] To whom do the dead belong? The French Foreign Legion exemplifies a modern military conundrum: how to reconcile loyal and patriotic duty with mercenary service or, in neutral terms, military labour. This article investigates soldierly funeral culture in the long nineteenth century, with a focus on the entangled histories of Luxembourg and France. The Foreign Legion’s transnational recruitment makes this armed force a unique case study to explore military commemoration across state borders, honouring the dead and the living alike. Since its establishment to fight outside mainland France, rooted in the conquest of Algeria (1830–1857), the Legion has been the only branch of the French military whose members swear allegiance not to France, but to the corps itself: its motto is Legio Patria Nostra (»The Legion is our Homeland«). As a military parallel society and temporary »ersatz nation«, the Legion has elaborated a specific death cult, which has both a corporeal (body-centred, individual) and a sur-real (transcendent, communal) dimension. The two dimensions cannot be rigidly delimited: they clearly overlap and can be shared with other nations, as the case of Luxembourg demonstrates.
Researchers ; Professionals ; Students ; General public
http://hdl.handle.net/10993/48662
This is a pre-print version of an article accepted for publication in Francia. Forschung zur westeuropäischen Geschichte, vol. 49 (2022), p.xx-xx. (no pagination yet).

File(s) associated to this reference

Fulltext file(s):

FileCommentaryVersionSizeAccess
Open access
Francia.2022.pdfAuthor preprint2.48 MBView/Open

Bookmark and Share SFX Query

All documents in ORBilu are protected by a user license.