Reference : Modulating cell response on cellulose surfaces; tunable attachment and scaffold mechanics
Scientific journals : Article
Life sciences : Biotechnology
http://hdl.handle.net/10993/41883
Modulating cell response on cellulose surfaces; tunable attachment and scaffold mechanics
English
Courtenay, James C. [University of Bath > Centre for Sustainable Chemical Technologies > > ; University of Bath > Department of Chemistry]
Deneke, Christoph [Brazilian Centre for National Research in Energy and Materials > Brazilian National Nanotechnology Laboratory]
Martin Lanzoni, Evandro mailto [Brazilian Centre for National Research in Energy and Materials > Brazilian National Nanotechnology Laboratory]
Costa, Carlos A. [Brazilian Centre for National Research in Energy and Materials > Brazilian National Nanotechnology Laboratory]
Bae, Yongho [The State University of New York > Department of Pathology and Anatomical Sciences]
Scott, Janet L. [University of Bath > Centre for Sustainable Chemical Technologies > > ; University of Bath > Department of Chemistry]
Sharma, Ram I. [University of Bath > Centre for Sustainable Chemical Technologies > > ; University of Bath > Department of Chemistry > > ; University of Bath > Department of Chemical Engineering]
2017
Cellulose
1--16
Yes (verified by ORBilu)
0969-0239
1572-882X
[en] Combining surface chemical modification of cellulose to introduce positively charged trimethylammonium groups by reaction with glycidyltrimethylammonium chloride (GTMAC) allowed for direct attachment of mammalian MG-63 cells, without addition of protein modifiers, or ligands. Very small increases in the surface charge resulted in significant increases in cell attachment: at a degree of substitution (DS) of only 1.4\%, MG-63 cell attachment was \textgreater 90 compared to tissue culture plastic, whereas minimal attachment occurred on unmodified cellulose. Cell attachment plateaued above DS of ca. 1.85 reflecting a similar trend in surface charge, as determined from ζ-potential measurements and capacitance coupling (electric force microscopy). Cellulose film stiffness was modulated by cross linking with glyoxal (0.3–2.6 degree of crosslinking) to produce a range of materials with surface shear moduli from 76 to 448 kPa (measured using atomic force microscopy). Cell morphology on these materials could be regulated by tuning the stiffness of the scaffolds. Thus, we report tailored functionalised biomaterials based on cationic cellulose that can be tuned through surface reaction and glyoxal crosslinkin+g, to influence the attachment and morphology of cells. These scaffolds are the first steps towards materials designed to support cells and to regulate cell morphology on implanted biomaterials using only scaffold and cells, i.e. without added adhesion promoters.
http://hdl.handle.net/10993/41883
10.1007/s10570-017-1612-3
https://link-springer-com.ez106.periodicos.capes.gov.br/article/10.1007/s10570-017-1612-3

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