Reference : Cardiac cycle phase affect auditory-evoked potentials in response to acoustic startle...
Scientific congresses, symposiums and conference proceedings : Paper published in a book
Social & behavioral sciences, psychology : Neurosciences & behavior
http://hdl.handle.net/10993/40868
Cardiac cycle phase affect auditory-evoked potentials in response to acoustic startle stimuli, but not perceived intensity ratings
English
Bernard, Sam mailto [University of Luxembourg > Faculty of Language and Literature, Humanities, Arts and Education (FLSHASE) > Integrative Research Unit: Social and Individual Development (INSIDE) >]
Münch, E. E. []
Hansen, G. []
Bertsch, K. []
Vögele, Claus mailto [University of Luxembourg > Faculty of Language and Literature, Humanities, Arts and Education (FLSHASE) > Integrative Research Unit: Social and Individual Development (INSIDE) >]
Schulz, André mailto [University of Luxembourg > Faculty of Language and Literature, Humanities, Arts and Education (FLSHASE) > Integrative Research Unit: Social and Individual Development (INSIDE) >]
2019
45. Jahrestagung Psychologie und Gehirn - Abstractband
Kirschbaum, C.
University of Dresden
80-81
Yes
International
Dresden
Germany
45. Jahrestagung Psychologie und Gehirn
20-06-2019 to 22-06-2019
Deutsche Gesellschaft für Psychophysiologie und deren Anwendung (DGPA) und Fachgruppe Biologische Psychologie und Neuropsychologie der DGPs
Dresden
Germany
[en] Startle stimuli presented in the early cardiac cycle phase elicit lower responses than stimuli presented in the late cardiac
cycle phase. This effect, named ‚Cardiac modulation of startle (CMS)‘, was proposed to reflect baro-afferent signal processing
in the central nervous system. It is yet unclear, however, whether the CMS is due to a general sensory attenuation
effect by baro-afferent signal transmission or to a specific neural pathway that selectively attenuates startle stimulus
processing, but may eventually enhance other processes. The aim of the present study was, therefore, to address this
issue. In this present study 23 female participants were presented acoustic stimuli of varying intensities (95, 100, and 105
dBA) during early (R-wave + 230 ms) and late (R+ 530 ms) cardiac cycle phase. Startle responses (EMG of the M. Orbicularis
Oculi), auditory-evoked potentials (AEPs), and perceived intensity ratings of all stimuli were assessed. Higher startle
stimulus intensities evoked higher perceived intensity ratings, stronger EMG startle responses, and higher N1, P2, and P3
AEPs. Startle stimuli in the early cardiac cycle phase elicited lower startle responses, and a positive shift of the N1 and P3
components as compared to the late cardiac cycle phase. Intensity ratings were unaffected by the cardiac cycle phases.
The present AEP pattern associated with CMS appears to be unique across all startle modulation paradigms, supporting a
more specific neural pathway, rather than a general sensory attenuation.
http://hdl.handle.net/10993/40868

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