Reference : Lifetime exposure to adverse events and reinforcement sensitivity in obsessive-compul...
Scientific journals : Article
Social & behavioral sciences, psychology : Treatment & clinical psychology
http://hdl.handle.net/10993/29701
Lifetime exposure to adverse events and reinforcement sensitivity in obsessive-compulsive prone individuals
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Ceschi, G. [Department of Psychology, University of Geneva, Switzerland]
Hearn, M. [Department of Psychology, University of Geneva, Switzerland]
Billieux, Joël mailto [University of Luxembourg > Faculty of Language and Literature, Humanities, Arts and Education (FLSHASE) > Integrative Research Unit: Social and Individual Development (INSIDE)]
Van der Linden, M. [Department of Psychology, University of Geneva, Switzerland, Cognitive Psychopathology Unit, University of Liège, Belgium]
2011
Behaviour Change
Cambridge University Press
28
2
75-86
Yes (verified by ORBilu)
International
08134839
[en] Anxiety ; Diathesis-stress model ; Impulsivity ; Negative life events ; Obsessive-compulsive disorder ; Reward drive
[en] A diathesis-stress perspective of obsessive-compulsive symptoms (OCS) predicts that exposure to adverse events and personality dispositions jointly influence OCS. Gray and McNaughton's (2000) model of personality posits that, faced with challenging circumstances, individuals with a high sensitivity to punishment (SP) will be more prone to OCS because they cannot avoid the downward spiral into anxiety. The current study investigates OCS severity in relation to lifetime exposure to adverse events (AE), SP, and sensitivity to reward (SR) in 122 nonclinical adults. The results indicate that OCS severity is predicted by AE, SP and SR. Interestingly, the impact of adverse experiences is moderated by SR and not SP. These findings suggest that: (1) exposure to adverse events and SP are independent OCS risk factors, and (2) exposure to adverse events is more critical for reward dependent people. This is discussed in light of responsibility and 'not just right experiences' in OCS, along with the role of impulsivity in the obsessivecompulsive disorder spectrum.
http://hdl.handle.net/10993/29701
10.1375/bech.28.2.75

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