Reference : Reduced inhibitory control predicts persistence in laboratory slot machine gambling
Scientific journals : Article
Social & behavioral sciences, psychology : Treatment & clinical psychology
http://hdl.handle.net/10993/29693
Reduced inhibitory control predicts persistence in laboratory slot machine gambling
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Devos, G. [Laboratory for Experimental Psychopathology (LEP), Psychological Sciences Research Institute, Catholic University of Louvain, Louvain-la-Neuve, Belgium]
Clark, L. [Centre for Gambling Research at UBC, Department of Psychology, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada]
Maurage, P. [Laboratory for Experimental Psychopathology (LEP), Psychological Sciences Research Institute, Catholic University of Louvain, Louvain-la-Neuve, Belgium]
Kazimierczuk, M. [Laboratory for Experimental Psychopathology (LEP), Psychological Sciences Research Institute, Catholic University of Louvain, Louvain-la-Neuve, Belgium]
Billieux, Joël mailto [University of Luxembourg > Faculty of Language and Literature, Humanities, Arts and Education (FLSHASE) > Integrative Research Unit: Social and Individual Development (INSIDE)]
2015
International Gambling Studies
Routledge
15
3
408-421
Yes
International
14459795
[en] Impairments in inhibitory control characterize a range of addictive behaviours including gambling disorder. This study investigated the relationship between a neuropsychological measure of inhibitory control and behaviour on a simulated slot machine that included a measure of gambling persistence, in a non-clinical sample of regular gamblers. Regular gamblers (n =  75) performed a laboratory slot machine task for 30 trials where they could win real money, followed by a persistence phase under extinction (i.e. without wins). Participants also completed a stop-signal task, along with measures of gambling-related cognitions, social desirability, and symptoms of disordered gambling. In hierarchical regression models, reduced inhibitory control was found to predict greater persistence and a higher subjective desire to play again after both wins and near-misses (i.e. unsuccessful outcomes close to the jackpot). These data illustrate the impact of low inhibitory control on relevant behavioural tendencies in a group of regular gamblers. Our results help elucidate a cognitive process that may contribute to problem gambling, with implications for screening and treatment. © 2015 Taylor & Francis.
http://hdl.handle.net/10993/29693
10.1080/14459795.2015.1068351

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