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See detailDie Burg in St. Vith - Eine typisch „sponheimische“ Anlage?
Uhrmacher, Martin UL

Scientific Conference (2021, March 25)

Der Vortrag geht zwei Leitfragen nach: 1) Wer kommt als Erbauer der kürzlich archäologisch nachgewiesenen Burg in St. Vith in Frage? 2) Entspricht die Burg in ihrer repräsentativen und fortifikatorischen ... [more ▼]

Der Vortrag geht zwei Leitfragen nach: 1) Wer kommt als Erbauer der kürzlich archäologisch nachgewiesenen Burg in St. Vith in Frage? 2) Entspricht die Burg in ihrer repräsentativen und fortifikatorischen Gestaltung eventuell einem „sponheimischen Burgentypus“? [less ▲]

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See detaildolfiny: Convenience wrappers for DOLFINx
Zilian, Andreas UL; Habera, Michal UL

Scientific Conference (2021, March 23)

With the increased flexibility of DOLFINx and its reduction to core functionality, the responsibility for even some basic components of computational analysis is shifted to the user. This presentation ... [more ▼]

With the increased flexibility of DOLFINx and its reduction to core functionality, the responsibility for even some basic components of computational analysis is shifted to the user. This presentation provides an overview of the open-source package dolfiny, which provides end-user API interfaces to mesh/meshtags generation and processing, expression list handling, function interpolation and projection as well as the restriction of function spaces to parts of the computational domain. This functionality is consistently considered in interfaces to PETSc/SNES as nonlinear solver and SLEPc as eigensolver backend, both allowing the operation on block and nested operators. In addition, the package provides a convenient approach to incorporate time integration into the UFL formulation of the problem, which is exemplified for the generalised alpha method. The capability of dolfiny is demonstrated in a number of examples, ranging between finite strain structural analysis, plasticity and fluid-structure interaction. [less ▲]

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See detailDie Pädagogik des Translanguaging: Möglichkeiten und Herausforderungen. Keynote.
Kirsch, Claudine UL

Scientific Conference (2021, March 20)

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See detailDie Pädagogik des Translanguaging: Möglichkeiten und Herausforderungen
Kirsch, Claudine UL

Scientific Conference (2021, March 20)

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See detail3D Modelling in online learning for pre-service elementary school teachers at the University of Luxembourg
Kreis, Yves UL; Haas, Ben; Lavicza, Zsolt

Scientific Conference (2021, March 19)

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See detailUnfolding the Science Diplomacy Toolbox: Science and Innovation Centres
Epping, Elisabeth UL

Scientific Conference (2021, March 18)

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See detailBlockchain matters – on the phenomenon of legal disembodiment in blockchain technology
Becker, Katrin UL

Scientific Conference (2021, March 15)

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See detailNegative mood increases desire to eat, but not event-related potentials, for food images in bulimia nervosa
Lutz, Annika UL; Georgii, Claudio; Blechert, Jens et al

Scientific Conference (2021, March 12)

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See detailDigital history and the politics of digitization
Zaagsma, Gerben UL

Scientific Conference (2021, March 10)

This paper addresses the question of the politics of (cultural heritage) digitisation and its consequences for historical research. To put it simply, it discusses the question of why, where and how we can ... [more ▼]

This paper addresses the question of the politics of (cultural heritage) digitisation and its consequences for historical research. To put it simply, it discusses the question of why, where and how we can access what we can access. The online documentary record affects historical research and we need to understand how and in what ways our online evidentiary basis is constituted and might affect our research. [less ▲]

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See detailAccess to housing and education for children in migration: challenges and good practices
Sommarribas, Adolfo UL

Scientific Conference (2021, March 10)

This presentation focus on the access to housing and education for children in migration, the challenges confronted and the good practices detected.

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See detailThe Western European Borderlands. Overview of Possible Case-Studies
Venken, Machteld UL

Scientific Conference (2021, March 05)

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See detailExploring the History of Digital History
Zaagsma, Gerben UL

Scientific Conference (2021, March 01)

This short paper will present the first results, and outline my new project which investigates the early trajectories of history and computing and focuses on the networks of computing historians in the ... [more ▼]

This short paper will present the first results, and outline my new project which investigates the early trajectories of history and computing and focuses on the networks of computing historians in the pre-PC and early PC period. [less ▲]

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See detailInvestigating the role of individual differences in the hypoalgesic response to a virtual reality game: An exploratory analysis
Rischer, Katharina Miriam UL; Barcatta, Katharina; Battistutta, Layla UL et al

Scientific Conference (2021, March)

Introduction: Virtual reality (VR) has been shown to be a powerful method of redirecting attention away from pain and is increasingly used in clinical settings as a therapeutic tool for pain treatment ... [more ▼]

Introduction: Virtual reality (VR) has been shown to be a powerful method of redirecting attention away from pain and is increasingly used in clinical settings as a therapeutic tool for pain treatment. Yet, little is known about the underlying factors that modulate the size of the hypoalgesic response to a VR game, such as cognitive load and inter-individual differences in self-reported pain-related cognitions, emotion regulation habits, gaming skills, and executive functions. Methods: 90 healthy participants played two versions of the VR game 'Subnautica', differing in cognitive load (low load vs. high load). In the low load condition, participants navigated along a predefined route. In the high load condition, participants additionally memorized a series of single digits presented along the route. Pain heat thresholds as well as psychophysiological measures (ECG, EDA) were recorded during a passive control condition (in VR) prior to, as well as during, the two interactive sessions. In addition, participants completed several psychological questionnaires and different executive functioning tasks prior to the VR sessions. Results: Pain thresholds were significantly higher in the two interactive VR sessions when compared to the passive control condition, whereas the cognitive load of the game had no effect on pain thresholds. Individual differences in pain-related cognitions, prepotent response inhibition abilities and the level of emotional awareness reported by female participants, but not the level of gaming skills, influenced the size of the hypoalgesic effect. Discussion: In line with a growing body of studies, we observed a robust hypoalgesic response to playing a VR game, highlighting once more the potential of VR as a tool for pain reduction. Importantly, the hypoalgesic effect was not dependent on the participants’ level of gaming skills or the cognitive load of the game, suggesting that the sensory properties of the VR game were sufficient to change the processing of pain. [less ▲]

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See detailDeliberative constitution-making in Luxembourg
Burks, Deven UL; Kies, Raphaël UL

Scientific Conference (2021, February 26)

Luxembourg is a small constitutional monarchy and parliamentary democracy. Since its 1868 ratification, the Constitution of Luxembourg has been amended 35 times, so the document resembles more and more a ... [more ▼]

Luxembourg is a small constitutional monarchy and parliamentary democracy. Since its 1868 ratification, the Constitution of Luxembourg has been amended 35 times, so the document resembles more and more a patchwork quilt of basic institutions. Yet the past twenty years have seen a consensus amongst Luxembourg’s constitutional players on the need for modernization, motivated by the desire for a more coherent constitution. Article 114 vests the Chamber of Deputies with the power to initiate and to approve constitutional amendments in a two-step process. This has several consequences for deliberation. First, it is largely restricted to political elites because formal amendment powers rest solely with the Chamber. Second, there is little to no empowered maxi-public deliberation unless the Government supports a citizen consultation. Following the 2013 parliamentary elections, the new Government planned a two-part referendum on constitutional reform in summer 2015 and in winter 2015. The first referendum was intended to seek popular input on four proposals which voters rejected by large margins, and the second referendum was later scrapped. Nevertheless, this reform process has seen some participatory and deliberative experiments. For the purposes of the present COST Action, three events are of interest. First, charged by the Chamber of Deputies, the UL’s Parliamentary Studies Research Chair at organized in May 2014 CIVILEX, a citizens’ forum modelled along the lines of a 21st century Town Meeting to discuss each of the four referendum questions. Researchers found that group discussion sometimes produced significant shifts in opinion between the pre- and post-deliberation questionnaires. Furthermore, once experts had cleared up certain misunderstandings, citizens ably discussed the referendum proposals. Despite these largely positive experiences, this deliberative experiment remained an isolated experiment and was not renewed during the campaign leading up to the June 2015 referendum. Second, given the first referendum results, the Chamber made a renewed effort in 2015 to involve citizens in the constitutional reform process, so it collected proposals via a new web portal - www.ärvirschléi.lu (Your Recommendation) – and subsequently held a public hearing with those who had initiated proposals. The process yielded some participatory and deliberative outcomes, including the elaboration of several constitutional amendments. For instance, Chamber members reached consensus on strengthening the rights of children and of animals compared to their original text. Nevertheless, the webportal was not developed as an online deliberative forum and saw limited, self-selected participation. Consequently, though this was the only concrete involvement of citizens in the constitutional reform, it was the least deliberative of the three exercises. Third, since the Government had still planned to call a second referendum to vote on the constitutional reform as a whole, the Chamber again tasked the Chair with gauging public opinion. So, in July 2016, the Chaire organized CONSTITULUX, a new citizens’ forum to discuss the entire draft constitution. Citizens i.) raised pertinent questions, ii.) identified short- and long-term concerns and iii.) suggested improvements to the draft articles. One striking output was that participants were more supportive of the proposed constitutional reform. Like CIVILEX, it generated little concrete action from the Government. Moreover, the incidental and experimental nature of these events again meant that there was little maxi-public engagement. Following the draft constitution’s abandonment in November 2019, it remains to be seen what the future holds for deliberative democracy and constitution-making in Luxembourg. [less ▲]

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See detailImportance marking in EMI lectures: A comparative study
Deroey, Katrien UL; Johnson, Jane Helen

Scientific Conference (2021, February 23)

In this presentation we focus on how lecturers mark important information in their lectures. Being able to identify important information is fundamental to the learning process (Benson, 1989, p. 437), and ... [more ▼]

In this presentation we focus on how lecturers mark important information in their lectures. Being able to identify important information is fundamental to the learning process (Benson, 1989, p. 437), and the different levels of information in a lecture may be highlighted through a careful choice of language, including explicit macro markers (Chaudron & Richards, 1986; Allison & Tauroza, 1995; Jung, 2003; Titsworth & Kiewra, 2004). Previous research has focussed particularly on importance markers in native speaking (NS) lecturer discourse (e.g. Crawford Camiciottoli 2004; Deroey & Taverniers 2011, 2012; Deroey 2012, 2014, 2015). Our study expands this research to compare the use of lexicogrammatical importance markers in both NS and non-native speaker (NNS) lectures. A specially compiled corpus of about 365,000 words of Physical Science lectures was used in our study, featuring a balanced number of words from lectures in Italy (Johnson & Picciuolo, 2020; Picciuolo & Johnson, 2020) as well as in New Zealand, the UK and Malaysia (‘Engineering Lecture Corpus’ ). A qualitative analysis was done to annotate all instances of markers evaluating the importance of lecture content. These included verb, adjective or noun phrases containing an evaluation of importance. Assessment-related expressions were also marked. 378 separate instances were identified. More delicate analysis of the importance-marking phrases was done, with distributions and variations in frequent patterns identified in both NS and NNS lectures. While Verb phrases were found to be the most frequent in both NS and NNS lectures (62%), there was variation in the type of Verb patterns according to NS and NNS, as well as in verb choice. In general, though importance markers were distributed evenly over NS (=191) and NNS (=187) lectures, NS showed more variety than NNS in the type of pattern used, with adjective, metanoun and assessment-related expressions as well as idiomatic expressions figuring more frequently than in NNS, although there were significant differences also within the NS and NNS sub-corpora themselves. Whether these findings show that NNS are more aware of the risks of misunderstanding among their international student audiences (House, 2003; Mauranen, 2006), and thus use a smaller variety of less ambiguous importance markers, or that NNS have fewer language resources to draw on in the first place, awareness-raising among EMI lecturers is vital when preparing teacher training materials, given the expansion of ELF in international academic contexts where both lecturers and students are non-native speakers. References Allison, D., & Tauroza S. (1995). The effect of discourse organisation on lecture comprehension. English for Specific Purposes 14: 157-173. Benson, M.J. (1989). The Academic Listening Task: a case study. TESOL quarterly, vol. 23(3) 421-445. Chaudron, C., & Richards J. C. (1986). The effect of discourse markers on the comprehension of lectures. Applied Linguistics, vol. 7 (2) 113-127. Crawford Camiciottoli, B. (2004). Audience-oriented relevance markers in business studies lectures. In Del Lungo Camiciotti, G. & Tognini Bonelli, E. (Eds.), Academic Discourse: New Insights into Evaluation. Peter Lang, pp. 81–98. Deroey, K. L. B. (2012). What they highlight is: the discourse functions of basic wh-clefts in lectures. Journal of English for Academic Purposes 11/2: 112–24. Deroey, K.L.B. (2014). ‘Anyway, the point I'm making is': lexicogrammatical relevance marking in lectures. In Vandelanotte L., Kristin, D. Caroline G. & Ditte K. (Eds.), Recent advances in Corpus Linguistics: Developing and exploiting corpora, Amsterdam/New York, Rodopi, 265-291. Deroey, K. L. B. (2015) Marking importance in lectures: Interactive and Textual Orientation. Applied Linguistics 2015: 36/1: 51-72. Deroey, K. L. B., & Taverniers, M. (2011). A corpus-based study of lecture functions. Moderna Sprak 105/2: 1–22. Deroey, K. L. B., & Taverniers, M. (2012). Just remember this: Lexicogrammatical relevance markers in lectures. English for Specific Purposes. 31 (4) 221-233. House, J. (2003). Misunderstanding in intercultural university encounters. In House J., Kasper G and Ross S. (Eds.), Misunderstanding in social life: discourse approaches to problematic talk, London: Longman, 22-56. Johnson, J. H., & Picciuolo, M. (2020). Interaction in spoken academic discourse in an EMI context: the use of questions. Conference proceedings of the Congress UPV 6th International Conference on Higher Education Advances (HEAd’20) Domenech, J., Merello, P., de la Poza, E. & Peña-Ortiz, R. (Eds.), Editorial Universitat Politècnica de València, pp. 211-219. Mauranen, A. (2006). Signalling and preventing misunderstanding in English as a lingua franca communication. International Journal of the Sociology of Language, 177: 123-150. Picciuolo, M., & Johnson, J. H. (2020). Contrasting EMI lecturers’ perceptions with practices at the University of Bologna. In Miller, D.R. (Ed.), Quaderni del CeSLiC. Occasional papers. Bologna: Centro di Studi Linguistico-Culturali (CeSLiC), Università di Bologna. AlmaDL, p. 23. http://amsacta.unibo.it/6399/ Titsworth, S. B., & Kiewra, K.A. (2004). Spoken organizational lecture cues and student notetaking as facilitators of student learning. Contemporary Educational Psychology 29: 447-461. [less ▲]

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See detail3D modelling for pre-service primary school teachers in mathematics education
Kreis, Yves UL; Haas, Ben

Scientific Conference (2021, February 17)

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See detailKeynote: Service Oriented Architecture Chances and Challenges
Gonzalez de Oliveira, Ricardo UL; Chirstian, Kerstan; Henkel, Achim

Scientific Conference (2021, February 11)

Service Oriented Architectures are neither new nor very complicated. Quite the opposite. With the introduction of Ethernet into vehicles service based communication became reality. Therefore, the big SOA ... [more ▼]

Service Oriented Architectures are neither new nor very complicated. Quite the opposite. With the introduction of Ethernet into vehicles service based communication became reality. Therefore, the big SOA dream of independent hardware and software deployment seems to be in reach. Not only SOME/IP faces the challenge of service discovery and situation aware communication. However, automotive industry is far from mobilizing the full potential. The presentation will give an overview about the most crucial challenges we have to tackle and provide some – hopefully – helpful approaches how to overcome them. [less ▲]

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See detailQoS-Predictable SOA on TSN: Insights from a Case-Study
Villanueva, Josetxo; Migge, Jörn; Navet, Nicolas UL

Scientific Conference (2021, February 09)

This work is about the design and configuration of service-oriented communication on top of Ethernet TSN. The first objective is to present takeaways from the design and implementation of the Renault E/E ... [more ▼]

This work is about the design and configuration of service-oriented communication on top of Ethernet TSN. The first objective is to present takeaways from the design and implementation of the Renault E/E Service-Oriented Architecture (SOA) called FACE. In particular, we discuss technological, design and configuration choices made for the SOA, such as how to segment messages (UDP with multiple events, TCP, SOME/IP TP), and the technical possibilities to shape the transmission of the packets on the Ethernet network. The second objective is to study how to ensure the Quality of Service (QoS) required by services. Indeed, services introduce specific challenges, be it only the sheer amount of traffic they generate and if there is a growing body of experiences in the use of TSN QoS mechanisms most of what has been learned so far is mostly about meeting the requirements of individual streams. Less is known for services that involve the transmission of several, possibly segmented, messages with more complex transmission patterns. We show on the FACE architecture how SOME/IP messages were mapped to TSN QoS mechanisms in a manual then automated manner so as to meet the individual requirements of the services in terms of timing, and the system’s requirements in terms of memory usage. [less ▲]

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See detailThe Minor Order for Homomorphisms via Natural Dualities
Poiger, Wolfgang UL; Teheux, Bruno UL

Scientific Conference (2021, February 05)

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See detailInvestigating heuristic algorithms for minimal controller location set problem in transportation networks
Mazur, Xavier UL; Rinaldi, Marco; Viti, Francesco UL

Scientific Conference (2021, February)

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See detailA Markov Chain Monte Carlo Approach for Estimating Daily Activity Patterns
Scheffer, Ariane Hélène Marie UL; Bandiera, Claudia UL; Cipriani, Ernesto et al

Scientific Conference (2021, February)

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See detailSensitivity Analysis on Regularity Based Driver Advisory Systems
Laskaris, Georgios; Seredynski, Marcin; Viti, Francesco UL

Scientific Conference (2021, February)

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See detailOrbit Maintenance Strategy for Earth-Moon Halo Orbits
Muralidharan, Vivek UL; Howell, Kathleen C.

Scientific Conference (2021, February)

The L1 and L2 Near Rectilinear Halo Orbits (NRHOs) are proposed long horizon trajectories for cislunar exploration missions. Due to unmodeled forces as well as orbit determination errors in this ... [more ▼]

The L1 and L2 Near Rectilinear Halo Orbits (NRHOs) are proposed long horizon trajectories for cislunar exploration missions. Due to unmodeled forces as well as orbit determination errors in this dynamically sensitive region, the spacecraft deviates from the desired path. The current investigation focuses on an extended analysis of an impulsive stationkeeping technique to maintain the spacecraft near a long horizon virtual reference orbit. The dynamics in the halo orbit region are explored to identify suitable maneuver and target locations for stationkeeping. Furthermore, phasing constraints are incorporated to maintain spacecrafts on orbit where position and velocity states are sensitive to epoch time. [less ▲]

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See detailWorking towards responsive science education pedagogies during a time of crisis: centering community, diversity and access
Te Heesen, Kerstin UL; Siry, Christina UL; de Albuquerque Trigo, Maiza UL et al

Scientific Conference (2021, January 30)

Children, teachers, and families internationally are navigating new terrains of remote learning and teaching during the COVID-19 crisis, and this extends to the University of Luxembourg's SciTeach Center ... [more ▼]

Children, teachers, and families internationally are navigating new terrains of remote learning and teaching during the COVID-19 crisis, and this extends to the University of Luxembourg's SciTeach Center team, a multidisciplinary group of educators and researchers dedicated to supporting primary and pre-primary science education. Luxembourg’s schools closed mid-March 2020, with rapid implementation of online/distance schooling. By mid-May, the national scenario started changing with deconfinement stages, and schools adopted blended in-person/distance structure of rotating “A” and “B” weeks of instruction, ending the year with two weeks of “back to normal”. What are we wondering about? The SciTeach team responded to changing circumstances with several initiatives to support science education within new structures. The team’s interactions in response to the pandemic and resulting outcomes are the focus of a case study utilizing ethnographic methods and discourse analysis. We are examining planning discussions and development of remote science education resources for in-service teachers, children, and caregivers, with a purpose of identifying essential steps in the process, and the resulting impacts of changes. Why is this wondering important? This wondering will elaborate an adaptation process as we transitioned to online modes of interacting, reflecting on the applicability of responsive pedagogies during crisis. This crisis has exposed issues of equity and access, in particular with the high percentage of students who do not speak the languages of instruction at home (more than half) and has given rise to questions about what structural changes will/can remain ahead. As our main goal is to support children’s engagement in science, we discuss benefits and challenges associated with these responses as they were developed not with the intent to only respond, but to offer teachers a sustainable approach to support students in engaging in science moving forward. What approaches frame our thinking? Grounded in sociocultural theoretical perspectives (Sewell, 1999), we understand the teaching-learning processes as cultural enactment, and we draw on translanguaging perspectives (García, 2009) and multimodal approaches (Kress, 2004). Our theoretical and methodological approach is grounded as bricolage (Kincheloe, 2001), and we hope to honor the diversity and complexity of engaging in research with participants. We seek to trouble the existing policy-based notions of science "proficiency" as we consider diverse ways teachers, students, and families engage in science education, with a particular focus on examining issues of equity and access during crisis. Why is our wondering important to equity, diversity and / or social justice in science education? The overarching purpose of this work is identifying the adaptation process and reflecting upon the resulting impacts of changes. Issues of access and equity are multiple, for teachers, children, and caregivers, and our wondering focuses on three questions: • How can we work towards resource-rich approaches for working with students – to build on what they know and wonder – and make openings for engaging in science inquiry? • How can we support equitable student access to science, given the range of languages and technology access? • How can we keep and nurture community during times of rapid unplanned changes, and shifting interaction structures? [less ▲]

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See detailArtificial Intelligence and Sentencing in Criminal Justice
Allegrezza, Silvia UL

Scientific Conference (2021, January 27)

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See detailUnd was ist mit den Kindern? COVID-Kids: Daten der COVID-Kids I Studie aus der Schweiz
Kirsch, Claudine UL

Scientific Conference (2021, January 18)

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See detailThermo-mechanical coupling and part-level analysis for additive manufacturing processes
Mashhood, Muhammad UL; Baroli, Davide; Zilian, Andreas UL et al

Scientific Conference (2021, January 13)

[1] Hussein, A. and Hao, L. and Yan, C. and Everson, R. Finite element simulation of the temperature and stress fields in single layers built without-support in selective laser melting. Materials & Design ... [more ▼]

[1] Hussein, A. and Hao, L. and Yan, C. and Everson, R. Finite element simulation of the temperature and stress fields in single layers built without-support in selective laser melting. Materials & Design (1980-2015), (2013), 52:638–647. [2] Bangerth, W. and Hartmann, R. and Kanschat, G. deal.II – a General Purpose Object Oriented Finite Element Library. ACM Trans. Math. Softw.(2007), Vol. 33., 4:24/1–24/27. [less ▲]

Peer Reviewed
See detailThe real problem with Rawlsian reasonableness
Burks, Deven UL

Scientific Conference (2021, January 07)

Rawlsian “reasonableness” has been criticized as “loaded” (Stout 2004: 184), “chimerical” (Young 2005: 308) or “entirely circular” (Mulhall and Swift 2003: 483). Yet these reactions often equivocate on ... [more ▼]

Rawlsian “reasonableness” has been criticized as “loaded” (Stout 2004: 184), “chimerical” (Young 2005: 308) or “entirely circular” (Mulhall and Swift 2003: 483). Yet these reactions often equivocate on the meaning of reasonableness (Freeman 2004: 2063-5). Herein, I propose a narrow, immanent criticism whereon the two basic aspects of reasonableness – (A1) proposing and abiding by fair terms of cooperation and (A2) recognizing the “burdens of judgment” (Rawls 1996: 54-8) – may conflict: accepting (A2) may give the person reason to disagree over the need for (A1). To show this, I first restate two aspects of reasonableness as a biconditional: a person is reasonable iff (A1) and (A2) obtain. I then examine whether the five burdens give reason to doubt the requirement in (A1). I find that each burden gives at least some reason to doubt just this requirement and conclude that Rawlsian reasonableness is inconsistent and in need of reformulation. This analysis yields two striking conclusions. First, public reason becomes looser and shifts to the domain of politics where one sees what public reasons others may in fact accept (Laden 2001). Seen from a different angle, one need not accept the idea that the first basic aspect and, hence, Rawlsian reasonableness are necessary conditions of political justification under conditions of reasonable pluralism (contra Krasnoff 2014: 696-7): rejecting this aspect and reasonableness in no way means that there can be no political justification under conditions of (reasonable) pluralism. Second, when conceiving justification and discourse, Rawls may be committed, despite himself, to accepting “reasonableness pluralism”, i.e. the view that there exist distinct, possibly irreconcilable accounts of reasonableness to which one may appeal when conceiving justification and discourse. Their combination may lead to a public reason liberalism framework which is at once looser and more actionable. [less ▲]

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See detailA Distributed Pareto-based Path Planning Algorithm for Autonomous Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (Extended Abstract)
Samir Labib, Nader UL; Danoy, Grégoire UL; Brust, Matthias R. UL et al

Scientific Conference (2021, January 07)

Autonomous Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs) are in increasing demand thanks to their applicability in a wide range of domains. However, to fully exploit such potential, UAVs should be capable of ... [more ▼]

Autonomous Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs) are in increasing demand thanks to their applicability in a wide range of domains. However, to fully exploit such potential, UAVs should be capable of intelligently planning their collision-free paths as that impacts greatly the execution quality of their applications. While being a problem well addressed in literature, most presented solutions are either computationally complex centralised approaches or ones not suitable for the multiobjective requirements of most UAV use-cases. This extended abstract introduces ongoing research on a novel distributed Pareto path planning algorithm incorporating a dynamic multi-criteria decision matrix allowing each UAV to plan its collision-free path relying on local knowledge gained via digital stigmergy. The article presents some initial simulations results of a distributed UAV Traffic Management system (UTM) on a weighted multilayer network. [less ▲]

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See detailA CutFEM Method for a spatial resolved energy metabolism model in complex cellular geometries
Farina, Sofia UL

Scientific Conference (2021, January)

Computational techniques have been widely used to tackle problems in the biological sciences. A com- promise between high quality simulations and simple but accurate models can help to understand un ... [more ▼]

Computational techniques have been widely used to tackle problems in the biological sciences. A com- promise between high quality simulations and simple but accurate models can help to understand un- known aspects of this field. In this work, we will show how the Cut Finite Element Method (CutFEM) [1] can be a powerful tool to solve a reaction diffusion PDE system that models the energy metabolism of a cell. The main difficulty to approach this problem is dealing with the morphology of the cell that can have sharp edges and evolves over time. While classical FEM requires the mesh conform to the domain boundary, CutFEM allows a non-conforming discretisation of the domain, and thus is especially suited for modeling complex and evolving cellular geometries. First, we introduce our simplified model for metabolic pathways taking place in a region small enough to consider the material property as homogeneous. The results obtained with FEM (FENICS Project [2][3]) and CutFEM suggest that the two methods are equivalent. This allows us to use CutFEM to increase the complexity of the domain, from a spherical shaped cell to an irregular astrocyte. We conclude that CutFEM is a robust method for tackling biological problems with complex geometries, opening the possibility to extend the complexity of our mathematical model including more features and to consider real cellular shapes that evolve in time in future work. [less ▲]

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See detailCollaboration between home and crèches: perspectives, experiences and expectations of educators in Luxembourg
Kirsch, Claudine UL; Aleksic, Gabrijela UL

Scientific Conference (2021)

Multiliteracies in early childhood education are promoted by researchers in multilingual education (García et al., 2017) and the European Commission. One way in which educators in crèches can develop ... [more ▼]

Multiliteracies in early childhood education are promoted by researchers in multilingual education (García et al., 2017) and the European Commission. One way in which educators in crèches can develop literacies in multiple languages is through collaboration with parents. Collaboration has been shown to positively influence educators, parents, and children. Educators, for instance, become aware of children’s funds of knowledge and draw on the learners’ resources and make their teaching more linguistically and culturally inclusive (Wells Rowe & Miller, 2016). While collaboration can be highly effective, the establishment of partnerships is difficult. Successful partnerships depend on several factors, among them the professionals’ beliefs, experiences, expectations, as well as space and time (Lengyel & Salem, 2016; Reynolds et al., 2017). Collaboration has been a focus of attention in Luxembourg since the introduction of multilingual education in formal and non-formal early childhood institutions. Since 2017 teachers in schools and educators in crèches are required to develop children’s skills in Luxembourgish, familiarise them with French, and value their home languages. Partnerships with parents is one pillar of this programme. A previous study has shown that educators are beginning to develop such partnerships (Kirsch 2019). The longitudinal project Collaboration with parents and Multiliteracy in early Childhood Education (COMPARE) uses a mixed-method approach to examine the multiliteracy practices as well as partnership building between parents and educators in crèches in Luxembourg. In this paper we present the perspectives of educators on partnership building and multiliteracy. The data stem from two online questionnaires completed by educators in 2020. We examine the practitioners’ perspectives on collaboration (Betz et al. 2017), modes and types of partnerships (e.g. Thiersch, 2006), types and frequency of collaborative activities in multiple languages (e.g. Hachfeld et al., 2016), and factors influencing collaboration (e.g. Reynolds et al., 2017). The data show that the declared practices are multilingual and that parents come to the crèche to do literacy activities in languages other than the main one(s) of the crèches. However, new language hierarchies are being developed. The findings demonstrate that educators and parents are actors in shaping new policies while also pointing to some arising inequalities. [less ▲]

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See detailAssessment of a textile portable exoskeleton for the upper limbs' flexion
Samper-Escudero, Jose Luis; Coloma Chacon, Sofia UL; Olivares Mendez, Miguel Angel UL et al

Scientific Conference (2021)

Flexible exoskeletons are lightweight robots that surround the user’s anatomy to assist or oppose motion. Their structure is made of light and flexible materials, like fabrics, so the forces created by ... [more ▼]

Flexible exoskeletons are lightweight robots that surround the user’s anatomy to assist or oppose motion. Their structure is made of light and flexible materials, like fabrics, so the forces created by the robot are directly transferred to the user’s musculoskeletal system. Exosuits are thus sensitive to the sliding of the actuation, textile perturbations and improper fitting to the user. LUXBIT is a cable-driven flexible exoskeleton that combines fabrics and sewing patterns to promote its anatomical adaption. The exoskeleton is intended for bimanual assistance of daily tasks and long-term usage. To this end, the system reduces the pressures applied to the user and the misalignment of the actuation by stacking textile patches. The patches enhance the functioning of the base garment and promote the transference of the assistance forces. Additionally, LUXBIT has a compact actuation with deformable components to prevent the user movements from being restricted. The exoskeleton is portable by using an enhanced textile backpack. This paper shows the exoskeleton’s benefits for trajectory and muscle activity during the flexion of the shoulder and the elbow. [less ▲]

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See detailPower and Bandwidth Minimization for Demand-Aware GEO Satellite Systems
Abdu, Tedros Salih UL; Kisseleff, Steven UL; Lagunas, Eva UL et al

Scientific Conference (2021)

Smart radio resource allocation combined with the recent advances of digital payloads will allow to control the transmit power and bandwidth of the satellites depending on the demand and the channel ... [more ▼]

Smart radio resource allocation combined with the recent advances of digital payloads will allow to control the transmit power and bandwidth of the satellites depending on the demand and the channel conditions of users. The system flexibility is important not only to handle divergent demand requirements but also to efficiently utilize the limited and expensive satellite resources. In this paper, we propose a demand-aware smart radio resource allocation technique, where the transmit power and the bandwidth of the GEO satellite are minimized while satisfying the user demand. The formulated optimization problem is non-convex mixed-integer nonlinear program which is difficult to solve. Hence, we apply a quadratic transform to solve the problem iteratively. The numerical results showed that the proposed scheme outperforms the benchmark schemes in terms of bandwidth utilization while accurately providing capacity-ondemand. [less ▲]

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See detailSparse Array Beampattern Synthesis via Majorization-Based ADMM
Wei, Tong UL

Scientific Conference (2021)

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See detailParcours contemporains du regard sur des œuvres du XVIIIe siècle
Blanc, Mathias UL; Martinez, Victoria; Delmas, Laurine

Scientific Conference (2021)

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See detailIntroducing the DHARPA Project: An interdisciplinary lab to enable critical DH practice
Viola, Lorella UL; Cunningham, Angela UL; Jascov, Helena

Scientific Conference (2021)

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See detailProceedings of the AI4Health Lecture Series (2021)
Schommer, Christoph UL; Sauter, Thomas UL; Pang, Jun UL et al

Scientific Conference (2021)

The research field between Artificial Intelligence and Health sciences has established itself as a central research direction in recent years and has also further increased social interest. On the one ... [more ▼]

The research field between Artificial Intelligence and Health sciences has established itself as a central research direction in recent years and has also further increased social interest. On the one hand, this is due to the emergence of medical mass data and their use for AI-related fields, such as machine learning, human-computer interfaces and natural language-processing systems, and on the other hand, it is also due to the steadily growing social interest, which is not determined by the current Covid 19 pandemic. To this end, the lecture series is intended to provide an opportunity for scientific exchange. [less ▲]

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See detailTransmit Beampattern Synthesis for Planar Array with One-bit DACs
Wei, Tong UL; Wu, Linlong UL; Alaeekerahroodi, Mohammad UL et al

Scientific Conference (2021)

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See detailA Low-complexity Resource Optimization Technique for High Throughput Satellite
Abdu, Tedros Salih UL; Kisseleff, Steven UL; Lagunas, Eva UL et al

Scientific Conference (2021)

The high throughput satellites with flexible payloads are expected to provide a high data rate to satisfy the increasing traffic demand. Furthermore, the reconfiguration capability of flexible payloads ... [more ▼]

The high throughput satellites with flexible payloads are expected to provide a high data rate to satisfy the increasing traffic demand. Furthermore, the reconfiguration capability of flexible payloads opens the door to more advanced system optimization techniques and a better utilization of satellite resources. Consequently, we can obtain high demand satisfaction at the user side. For this, dynamically adaptive high-performance and low-complexity optimization algorithms are needed. In this paper, we propose a novel low-complexity resource optimization technique for geostationary (GEO) High Throughput Satellites. The proposed method minimizes the transmit power and the overall satellite bandwidth while satisfying the demand per beam. This optimization problem turns out to be non-convex. Hence, we convexify the problem using Dinkelbach method and Successive Convex Approximation (SCA). The simulation result shows that the proposed scheme provides better flexibility in resource allocation and requires less computational time compared to the state-of-art benchmark schemes. [less ▲]

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See detailPrecoding-Aided Bandwidth Optimization for High Throughput Satellite Systems
Abdu, Tedros Salih UL; Lei, Lei UL; Kisseleff, Steven UL et al

Scientific Conference (2021)

Linear precoding boosts the spectral efficiency of the satellite system by mitigating the interference signal. Typically, all users are precoded and share the same bandwidth regardless of the user demand ... [more ▼]

Linear precoding boosts the spectral efficiency of the satellite system by mitigating the interference signal. Typically, all users are precoded and share the same bandwidth regardless of the user demand. This bandwidth utilization is not efficient since the user demand permanently varies. Hence, demand-aware bandwidth allocation with linear precoding is promising. In this paper, we exploited the synergy of linear precoding and flexible bandwidth allocation for geostationary (GEO) high throughput satellite systems. We formulate an optimization problem with the goal to satisfy the demand by taking into account that multiple precoded user groups can share the different bandwidth chunks. Hence, optimal beam groups are selected with minimum bandwidth requirement to match the per beam demand. The simulation results show that the proposed method of combining bandwidth allocation and linear precoding has better bandwidth efficiency and demand satisfaction than benchmark schemes. [less ▲]

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See detailBEGYN: Auswirkungen von Bewegung und sportlicher Aktivität bei gynäkologischen Krebspatienten auf Lebensqualität, Körperzusammensetzung und prognoserelevante Biomarker
Zemlin, Cosima; Stuhlert, Caroline; Schleicher, Julia Theresa et al

Scientific Conference (2021)

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See detailInvesting in Crises
Penasse, Julien UL

Scientific Conference (2021)

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See detailInvesting in Crises
Penasse, Julien UL

Scientific Conference (2021)

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See detailCommunity Detection in Complex Networks: A Survey on Local Approaches
Esmaeilzadeh Dilmaghani, Saharnaz UL; Brust, Matthias R. UL; Danoy, Grégoire UL et al

Scientific Conference (2021)

Early approaches of community detection algorithms often depend on the network’s global structure with a time complexity correlated to the network size. Local algorithms emerged as a more efficient ... [more ▼]

Early approaches of community detection algorithms often depend on the network’s global structure with a time complexity correlated to the network size. Local algorithms emerged as a more efficient solution to deal with large-scale networks with millions to billions of nodes. This methodology has shifted the attention from global structure towards the local level to deal with a network using only a portion of nodes. Investigating the state-of-the-art, we notice the absence of a standard definition of locality between community detection algorithms. Different goals have been explored under the local terminology of community detection approaches that can be misunderstood. This paper probes existing contributions to extract the scopes where an algorithm performs locally. Our purpose is to interpret the concept of locality in community detection algorithms. We propose a locality exploration scheme to investigate the concept of locality at each stage of an existing community detection workflow. We summarized terminologies concerning the locality in the state-of-the-art community detection approaches. In some cases, we observe how different terms are used for the same concept. We demonstrate the applicability of our algorithm by providing a review of some algorithms using our proposed scheme. Our review highlights a research gap in community detection algorithms and initiates new research topics in this domain. [less ▲]

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See detailStudents’ lesson-to-lesson perceptions of the three basic dimensions of instructional quality
Talic, Irma UL; Scherer, Ronny; Marsh, H. W. et al

Scientific Conference (2021)

Detailed reference viewed: 21 (0 UL)
See detailFast bases for half-integral weight modular forms
Wiese, Gabor UL

Scientific Conference (2021)

In this joint work with Ilker Inam, we exploit classical results of Kohnen and Cohen to give explicit bases of the spaces of half-integral weight modular forms of level Gamma_0(4) in any weight, which can ... [more ▼]

In this joint work with Ilker Inam, we exploit classical results of Kohnen and Cohen to give explicit bases of the spaces of half-integral weight modular forms of level Gamma_0(4) in any weight, which can be compared to the Miller bases for integral weight modular forms of level 1. They are very simple and can be computed quickly by performing power series multiplications. In further work with Inam et al., we apply them to a computational study of the distribution of signs of such modular forms. [less ▲]

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See detailThe supply of hours worked and fluctuations between growth regimes
Irmen, Andreas UL; Iong, Ka-Kit UL

Scientific Conference (2021)

Declining hours of work per worker in conjunction with a growing work force may give rise to fluctuations between growth regimes. This is shown in an overlapping generations model with two-period lived ... [more ▼]

Declining hours of work per worker in conjunction with a growing work force may give rise to fluctuations between growth regimes. This is shown in an overlapping generations model with two-period lived individuals endowed with Boppart-Krusell preferences (Boppart and Krusell (2020)). On the supply side, economic growth is due to the expansion of consumption-good varieties through endogenous research. A sufficiently negative equilibrium elasticity of the individual supply of hours worked to an expansion in the set of consumption-good varieties destabilizes the steady state so that equilibrium trajectories may fluctuate between two growth regimes, one with and the other without an active research sector. Fluctuations affect intergenerational welfare, the evolution of GDP, and the functional income distribution. A stabilization policy can shift the economy onto its steady-state path. Fluctuations arise for empirically reasonable parameter constellations. The economics of fluctuations between growth regimes is linked to the intergenerational trade of shares and their pricing in the asset market. [less ▲]

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See detailWidely-distributed Radar Imaging Based on Consensus ADMM
Hu, Ruizhi UL; Rao, Bhavani Shankar Mysore Rama; Murtada, Ahmed et al

Scientific Conference (2021)

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See detailDynamic Resource Assignment for Heterogeneous Services in 5G Downlink Under Imperfect CSI
Korrai, Praveenkumar UL; Lagunas, Eva UL; Shree Krishna Sharma et al

Scientific Conference (2021)

This paper addresses the radio access network (RAN) resource slicing problem in the context of the joint allocation of transmit powers and time-frequency resource blocks (RBs) in the 5G system consisting ... [more ▼]

This paper addresses the radio access network (RAN) resource slicing problem in the context of the joint allocation of transmit powers and time-frequency resource blocks (RBs) in the 5G system consisting of ultra-reliable and low-latency communication (URLLC) and enhanced mobile broadband (eMBB) users. Specifically, we formulate a modulation and coding scheme (MCS) based optimization problem to maximize the sum goodput of eMBB users while satisfying URLLC and eMBB users' QoS requirements. The proposed scheme considers the impact of imperfect channel state information (CSI) and the active user's queue status for the dynamic assignment of radio resources to the heterogeneous users according to its demand. The resulting mixed-integer non-convex problem is first transformed into a tractable form by exploiting the probabilistic to non-probabilistic conversion, Big-M theory, and difference-of-convex (DC) programming. Later, the transformed problem is solved using the successive convex approximation (SCA) based iterative algorithm. Our simulation results illustrate the superiority of the proposed algorithm compared to the baseline methods in terms of eMBB rate, latency in delivering the URLLC packets, and total power consumption. [less ▲]

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See detailRelationships between quantum IND-CPA notions
Ebrahimi, Ehsan UL; Unruh, Dominique; Carstens, Tore et al

Scientific Conference (2021)

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See detailVisiteurs, sculptures et réalité augmentée : l’expérience Ikonikat 3D au Louvre-Lens
Blanc, Mathias UL; Legeay, Guilaine; Bremard, Nicolas et al

Scientific Conference (2021)

In the field of Museum Studies, the notion of "visitor's experience" invites us to go beyond the ordinary oppositions between phenomenological perspective and pragmatic approach. In order to experiment ... [more ▼]

In the field of Museum Studies, the notion of "visitor's experience" invites us to go beyond the ordinary oppositions between phenomenological perspective and pragmatic approach. In order to experiment the fruitfulness of this epistemic overcoming, we have developed the method of "annotation drawing" in situation. The first results already allow us to identify the different social-semiotic registers that unfold in such a situation of museum visit, questioning the museography and provoking a dialogue with the expert knowledge of the art historian. Initially focused on painting, a transposition of our method to sculpture enriches the problematic and accentuates the importance of taking into account the performative dimensions of the visitor's gaze and body. This imperative induces a development in "augmented reality" of our digital device, called "Ikonikat 3D", and an analysis of its effects on the social interaction. We have thus begun a study with this technology on the reception of casts of Louvre antiques, exhibited at the Louvre-Lens Museum. In front of the exhibited artworks, using the camera of a tablet and pointing it towards the sculpture, visitors can draw on the image that appears on their screen. They can turn around a work of art and make a drawing without losing the display of their successive drawings on the work. This interaction between visitors and the sculptures with Ikonikat 3D allows for unprecedented visitor feedback and engagement. [less ▲]

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See detailWind Music during the Nazi occupation in Luxembourg from 1940 to 1944
Sagrillo, Damien François UL

Scientific Conference (2020, December 18)

From 1940 to 1944 Luxembourg was governed by the National Socialist regime. Besides the many human destinies, social life also had to bear the consequences. The keyword is "Gleichschaltung" (co-ordination ... [more ▼]

From 1940 to 1944 Luxembourg was governed by the National Socialist regime. Besides the many human destinies, social life also had to bear the consequences. The keyword is "Gleichschaltung" (co-ordination). In my lecture, I will provide some examples to show how this abusive and arbitrary interference affected the activities of the music associations. [less ▲]

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See detailMultipath Mitigation Maps feasibility and applicability as an International GNSS Service product
Hunegnaw, Addisu UL; Teferle, Felix Norman UL; Elgered, Gunnar et al

Scientific Conference (2020, December 17)

There have been many advances in the modeling of Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) observables when estimating position and other parameters of interest. Some of these bias models are related to ... [more ▼]

There have been many advances in the modeling of Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) observables when estimating position and other parameters of interest. Some of these bias models are related to improvements of reference frames, phase center offsets and variations of transmitter and receiver antennas, satellite orbits and clocks, and troposphere. Nonetheless, multipath remains for the most part an unmodelled source of error which causes range errors in the GNSS observations. The associated effects show highly localized features and have a different impact for each receiver and antenna. Multipath errors can propagate, can cause in-situ position biases and are also contributing to the prevalent draconitic harmonic signals. In order to mitigate the problem we generate site-specific corrections by employing a suitable averaging scheme for the stacking of carrier phase residuals. Our processing is based on globally distributed static multi-GNSS observations using several scientific GNSS software packages (Bernese GNSS Software, NAPEOS, GAMIT-GLOBK, and CSRS-PPP). Our multipath stacking maps (MPS) use the stacking of carrier phase residuals generated by variable azimuth cell size (congruent cells) and by allocating carrier phase residuals in each cell to generate the correction maps, unlike the standard fixed azimuth cell resolution approaches. This reduces the binning of fewer residuals at higher elevation angles. Before stacking, we also apply rigorous statistical outlier screening tests for each one-way post-fit carrier phase residual assigned to each of the congruent cells. We thus correct the multipath effects by subtracting the stacked multipath map from the post-fit carrier phase residual. Using this technique we produce a model available in the form of the Antenna Exchange (ANTEX) file format, that can potentially be implemented in routine GNSS analysis with no or little additional overhead for individual analysis centers (ACs). In this study, we assess the feasibility and applicability of the MPS maps as an International GNSS Service (IGS) product for routine GNSS analysis. We demonstrate the multipath stacking technique to result in a significant reduction of the variation in the one-way post-fit carrier phase residuals from multi-GNSS observations. [less ▲]

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See detailVertical Land Movements and Sea Level Changes on South Georgia, South Atlantic Ocean: Results from 7 Years of Geodetic and Oceanographic Observations on a Remote Island
Teferle, Felix Norman UL; Hunegnaw, Addisu UL; Hibbert, Angela et al

Scientific Conference (2020, December 16)

South Georgia Island in the South Atlantic Ocean, is a small remote land mass that supports various ground-based instrumental observations (Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS), tide gauge ... [more ▼]

South Georgia Island in the South Atlantic Ocean, is a small remote land mass that supports various ground-based instrumental observations (Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS), tide gauge, meteorological and seismic) in an otherwise largely under sampled oceanic region. Moreover, the South Atlantic Ocean plays an important role in global ocean circulation, con-necting the deep thermohaline circulation of the North Atlantic and Indian Oceans, whilst also linking to the Antarctic Circumpolar Current in the South, where the lack of continental barriers allows a free exchange of water between the major ocean basins. Hence, South Georgia po-tentially lies within a region susceptible to climatic changes before these can be felt further afield. In 2013 and 2014 a total of five GNSS stations were installed covering the area of the main island (approximately 170 x 50 km) with two of those being located close to the King Edward Point (KEP) Research Station and the GLOSS tide gauge (ID 187). Furthermore, precise levelling campaigns in 2013, 2014, 2017 and 2020 supported the analysis of local ground instabilities near the tide gauge. Through these activities the tide gauge datum within the Permanent Ser-vice for Mean Sea Level (PSMSL) has been established, which in turn, makes the derived KEP mean sea level (MSL) record highly valuable for long-term studies and satellite altimetry cali-brations. In this study, we will present the vertical land movement estimates from seven years of GNSS observations, five precise levelling campaigns, and will discuss their impact on the sea level record from the KEP tide gauge and nearby satellite altimetry sea surface heights. Our results confirm uplift all over South Georgia Island while the area at KEP and particularly the jetty with tide gauge are subsiding relative to the rest of the island. Using this information we correct the MSL record for the vertical land movements and investigate its signals together with those from nearby satellite altimetry tracks. [less ▲]

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See detailMaking History Together: Public Participation in Museums
Cauvin, Thomas UL; Konstantinou, Katerina; Boccalatte, Paola et al

Scientific Conference (2020, December 15)

The international online symposium brought together scholars, museum professionals and heritage practitioners to discuss how participatory history is constructed, developed, and implemented in museums ... [more ▼]

The international online symposium brought together scholars, museum professionals and heritage practitioners to discuss how participatory history is constructed, developed, and implemented in museums. 'Making History Together: Public Participation in Museums' took place on 15 December 2020 and has brought together participants and case studies from all over the world. Sessions include discussions on co-creation and co-production, community of interpretation, digital public participatory practices, empowerment, and overall impact on making history in museums. [less ▲]

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See detailOutdoor STEAM integrated framework in elementary schools in Luxembourg using MathCityMap and GeoGebra 3D Calculator
Haas, Ben; Kreis, Yves UL; Lavicza, Zsolt

Scientific Conference (2020, December 15)

In elementary schools in Luxemburg, sciences and mathematics are generally taught in class based essentially on textbooks. However, the findings of multiple studies on understanding and applying skills in ... [more ▼]

In elementary schools in Luxemburg, sciences and mathematics are generally taught in class based essentially on textbooks. However, the findings of multiple studies on understanding and applying skills in STEAM (Science, Technology, Engineering, Arts and Mathematics) report that students need hands-on activities on real-world objects. Furthermore, in times of the COVID-19 pandemic, where numerous restrictions and risks dominate teaching inside the classroom, outdoor learning is safer and offers many opportunities. Hence, we created outdoor mathematical trails with a STEAM integrated approach for elementary schools using the free educational software MathCityMap and the dynamic mathematics software GeoGebra 3D. In these outdoor trails, students used a set of promising technologies, i.e. AR (Augmented Reality) or GPS, to support STEAM education. Based on results from our first study on outdoor mathematical trails in June 2020 (in review), we developed and evaluated a framework on outdoor STEAM integrated teaching. This framework was used for further outdoor task and trail creations in elementary schools, which we investigated by conducting semi-structured interviews with students and teachers. Hence, we will present how this framework was used in elementary schools to create outdoor mathematical trails and describe how it affected the students' learning. [less ▲]

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See detailPatrice Chéreau en marge de la bienséance classique : Le « Récit de Théramène » dans sa mise en scène de Phèdre de Jean Racine (2003, Ateliers Berthier, Théâtre de l'Odéon, Paris)
Deregnoncourt, Marine UL

Scientific Conference (2020, December 14)

Quand il met en scène, en 2003, aux Ateliers Berthier (Théâtre de l’Odéon, Paris, XVIIème), Phèdre de Jean Racine, Patrice Chéreau revient sur le devant de la scène théâtrale en souhaitant ... [more ▼]

Quand il met en scène, en 2003, aux Ateliers Berthier (Théâtre de l’Odéon, Paris, XVIIème), Phèdre de Jean Racine, Patrice Chéreau revient sur le devant de la scène théâtrale en souhaitant contemporanéiser une œuvre considérée, depuis l’année de sa parution (1677), comme la « quintessence de la tragédie française » . Cette volonté d’inscrire cette pièce dans le présent de la création artistique passe notamment par sa lecture singulière du « Récit de Théramène », lequel narre la mort d’Hippolyte. En effet, Patrice Chéreau entend s’opposer à la tradition littéraire de l’énonciation, sous forme d’hypotypose, par une tierce personne - en l’occurrence Théramène, gouverneur du jeune prince - et proposer ainsi une monstration pleinement assumée du corps ensanglanté, morcelé et déchiqueté du corps d’Hippolyte. Reliquat et objet de tous les désirs, le corps atrophié du jeune prince, autour duquel l’intrigue s’est construite, paraît au vu et au su de tous, acteurs comme spectateurs. À l’égard du texte racinien, ce corps apparaît excessif et en surplus vis-à-vis de l’action scénique. Dès lors, un tel parti pris, en marge de la tradition, mérite d’être interrogé, car il remet entièrement en perspective la question de la bienséance classique. Afin de le démontrer, notre réflexion sera divisée en deux parties. La première s’axera précisément sur la bienséance, caractéristique de l’esthétique classique. Dans le cas de ce récit anthologique, nous verrons que Jean Racine se joue lui-même des codes en se référant davantage à Sénèque qu’à Euripide. Le second temps de notre étude cherchera à appréhender le positionnement radical de Patrice Chéreau face à ces présupposés pour, in fine, tenter de comprendre comment ce metteur en scène rompt avec la doctrine classique et offre, par là même, une vision novatrice et inédite - qui deviendra emblématique - de Phèdre de Jean Racine [less ▲]

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See detailUnderstanding through Experimentation: An Experimental Media Archaeological Approach to Early Twentieth-Century Home Movie Making
van der Heijden, Tim UL

Scientific Conference (2020, December 11)

This presentation addresses the question in what ways visual media have contributed to the construction of a specific view on twentieth-century century (family) life by means of an experimental media ... [more ▼]

This presentation addresses the question in what ways visual media have contributed to the construction of a specific view on twentieth-century century (family) life by means of an experimental media archaeological approach to early home movie making. Based on hands-on experiments with an original Ciné-Kodak 16mm film camera from 1930, it will be shown how filming one’s family was never truly a neutral practice of capturing everyday life. Rather, making a home movie should be regarded a highly “co-constructive” practice that includes various social, sensorial, technological and user-related dimensions. The presentation reflects work in progress from the research project “Doing Experimental Media Archaeology” (DEMA) of the Centre for Contemporary and Digital History (C2DH) of the University of Luxembourg: https://dema.uni.lu/. [less ▲]

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See detailLehrende und Schüler im Film: Performanzen, Ansprüche, Begehren und Geniessen in Bildungsprozessen.
Weber, Jean-Marie UL

Scientific Conference (2020, December 05)

Das Kino ist ein pädagogisches Institut, das unsere Fantasien formt. Es sagt uns, wie wir überhaupt begehren können, behauptet der Kulturtheoretiker und Psychoanalytiker Slavoj Zizek. So ist es sinnvoll ... [more ▼]

Das Kino ist ein pädagogisches Institut, das unsere Fantasien formt. Es sagt uns, wie wir überhaupt begehren können, behauptet der Kulturtheoretiker und Psychoanalytiker Slavoj Zizek. So ist es sinnvoll, sich als Lehrerinnen für die filmischen Inszenierungen des Lehrens und Lernens zu interessieren und sich durch sie «an-sprechen» und affizieren zu lassen. Der Workshop gilt als Austausch über markante Ausschnitte in denen Lehrer, Schule oder Unterricht Subjektwerden bzw. in ihrer Subjektivation und Humanisation blockiert sind. Bestimmte Symptome des kollektiven und individuellen Imaginären sollen freigelegt werden. Dabei stellt sich auch die Frage, inwiefern man mit Hilfe dieser (Re)-Inszenierungen des Lehrens auf der Leinwand anthropologische und strukturelle Elemente des Lehrens und von transformatorischen Bildungsprozessen erschließen kann. Besonderes Interesse gilt dabei der Frage, wie Lehrerinnen im Spielfilm Singularität und Kollektivität erfolgreich artikulieren oder dabei scheitern. [less ▲]

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See detailRadial Urban Forms: Lessons from Land Profile Scaling Analyses & Spatial-Explicit Models
Caruso, Geoffrey UL

Scientific Conference (2020, November 25)

We definitely live in an increasingly urban World for half of humanity now lives in cities. Cities provide wealth but also negatively impact the environment and the health of citizens. Arguably the ... [more ▼]

We definitely live in an increasingly urban World for half of humanity now lives in cities. Cities provide wealth but also negatively impact the environment and the health of citizens. Arguably the benefits and costs of cities relate to both their size, in population terms, and their internal structure, in terms of the relative spatial arrangement of built-up and natural land. Much of urban research focusses on very large cities and urban cores. Yet 3 urban human out of 4 live in cities of less than 4 million inhabitants (according to the global GHSL dataset). Similarly, 3 out of 4 in a typical (European) city do not live in its core but beyond (using a 7-8km radius to define core for a city like London or Paris). To address urban sustainability issues and design adaptation policies, these 75% certainly count and, we can argue, also deserve specific attention because of the relative proximity between urban and non-urban (natural) use that smaller cities and suburban (non-core) areas may permit. In this respect, it is key to understand how the internal structure of cities, in particular the form and density of built-up areas and the interwoven green space emerge out of the core up until the fringe. It is also key to understand whether the form of cities, especially density gradients and the share of urbanised/non-urbanised land change with city size. In this talk we draw lessons from 2 research approaches to urban forms: one theoretical that uses spatial micro-economic simulations, and one empirical that uses spatially detailed land use datasets. Our theoretical simulations relate individual behaviour to urban forms while our empirics relate urban forms to city size. Both have in common a radial perspective to cities, i.e. explicitly or implicitly assuming that the accessibility trade-off to a given centre is a key determinant of locations and land uses. In both cases, we look at urbanisation and green space structures and at pollution exposure as an example of impact. [less ▲]

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See detailThe Helpers of Anne Frank - Recontextualising the Rescue of Dutch Jews
Zaagsma, Gerben UL

Scientific Conference (2020, November 24)

This paper sets out to recontextualise the memory of rescue as it pertains to Dutch Jewry during the Holocaust, by focusing on the helpers of Anne Frank and the other Jews in hiding in the Secret Annex ... [more ▼]

This paper sets out to recontextualise the memory of rescue as it pertains to Dutch Jewry during the Holocaust, by focusing on the helpers of Anne Frank and the other Jews in hiding in the Secret Annex. Much in the same way as perceptions of Jews in hiding have been decisively shaped by the story of Anne Frank, not only in the Dutch public imagination but arguably globally, so too the image of help, at least in the Western European and Anglosaxon world, has been considerably shaped by the story of two of the five helpers, Miep and Jan Gies, even if the support they provided to the onderduikers in the Secret Annex could ultimately not prevent discovery. The question of help, as well as the ultimate betrayal, of the onderduikers are linked to the broader question of the role of the Dutch population during the Holocaust. Within that context the Anne Frank story can and has indeed been used to provide both a stereotypical image of Gentile betrayal as well as an idealized and, arguably, romanticized image of Gentile help. In this paper I will trace the ways in which the image of help and rescue of Dutch Jews was shaped by the story of, especially, Miep Gies and analyse the ways in which her story resonated in the Netherlands as well as abroad. Important moments in this regard were the recognition of Miep Gies and the other helpers as Righteous Among the Nations in 1972, and the global publication of Miep Gies’ memoirs in 1987. I will frame this analysis within the broader historical context of 1) help provided to Jews in hiding in the Netherlands and the question of how representative the ‘helpers of Anne Frank’ were, and 2) the extent to which a focus on a few key individuals obscures the more complex reality of how rescue functioned in the first place. [less ▲]

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See detailExperimenter Effects in Children Using the Smileyometer Scale
Lehnert, Florence Kristin UL; Lallemand, Carine UL; Fischbach, Antoine UL et al

Scientific Conference (2020, November 19)

Researchers in the social sciences like human-computer interaction face novel challenges concerning the development of methods and tools for evaluating interactive technology with children. One of these ... [more ▼]

Researchers in the social sciences like human-computer interaction face novel challenges concerning the development of methods and tools for evaluating interactive technology with children. One of these challenges is related to the validity and reliability of user experience measurement tools. Scale designs, like the Smileyometer, have been proven to contain biases such as the tendency for children to rate almost every technology as great. This explorative paper discusses a possible effect of two experimenter styles on the distribution of 6-8 years old pupils' ratings (N= 73) to the Smileyometer. We administered the scale before and after a tablet-based assessment in two schools. Experimenter 1 employed a child-directed speech compared to a monotone speech of Experimenter 2. While brilliant (5 out of 5) was the most frequent answer option in all conditions, the mean scores were higher and associated with a lower variability across both conditions for Experimenter 2. We discuss a possible experimenter effect in the Smileyometer and implications for evaluating children’s user experiences. [less ▲]

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See detailOn socially constructed aspects of language (in)competence: Raising critical language awareness in the multilingual workplace
Lovrits, Veronika UL

Scientific Conference (2020, November 19)

In this theoretical contribution, I invite fellow researchers and managers to engage in a reflection on what is perceived as a competent language use at work. The objective is to open a broader discussion ... [more ▼]

In this theoretical contribution, I invite fellow researchers and managers to engage in a reflection on what is perceived as a competent language use at work. The objective is to open a broader discussion on seemingly obvious assumptions that may skew our understanding of everyday language practices. Critically reflected research review will point out to limitations of commonplace perspectives that mirror in managerial research and have implications for practice. Two questions will be discussed to raise critical awareness in the multilingual workplace: what linguistic norm sets the bar for the appropriateness of language use in the workplace, and whose interests does the language norm represent. This way, three problematic topics will be brought to attention: non acknowledged proliferation of linguistic concepts from education to workplace; questionable aptness of referring to standard language norm; and unacknowledged power plays fuelled by competing pragmatic needs of communicative partners. A reflection of power relations linked to norms and needs in the workplace may subsequently support a variety of practical managerial responses – ranging from a symbolic social acceptance of nonstandard language use to a decision to hire a professional linguistic service. [less ▲]

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See detailUpdate on NORMAN-SLE / SusDat for NORMAN-CWG-NTS Meeting (17 Nov 2020)
Schymanski, Emma UL

Scientific Conference (2020, November 17)

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See detailMultilingual education in early years in Luxembourg: mind ideologies!
Kirsch, Claudine UL

Scientific Conference (2020, November 14)

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See detailFormation à la pratique d’enseignement en temps de crise sanitaire: Conception, production et diffusion de vidéos pédagogiques à distance
Reuter, Robert UL; Reeff, Alain; Busana, Gilbert UL

Scientific Conference (2020, November 13)

Le Bachelor en Sciences de l’Education (BScE) de l’Université du Luxembourg propose une formation approfondie et exigeante alliant savoir académique et pratique. Ils sont formés pour enseigner dans tous ... [more ▼]

Le Bachelor en Sciences de l’Education (BScE) de l’Université du Luxembourg propose une formation approfondie et exigeante alliant savoir académique et pratique. Ils sont formés pour enseigner dans tous les cycles de l’école fondamentale, dans les classes de la voie de préparation et dans le contexte d’élèves à besoins éducatifs spécifiques au Luxembourg. Comme dans de nombreuses autres formations initiales des enseignants, le temps de terrain (ou stage) représente un moment clé de chaque semestre dans le BScE. Face à la crise sanitaire du COVID-19, ce dispositif de formation à la pratique pédagogique n’a pas pu être conservé. En effet, les écoles étaient fermées, les élèves étaient scolarisés à distance par leur enseignant. Nous avons donc dû rapidement innover et mettre en place des activités d’apprentissage alternatives qui correspondaient au mieux aux objectifs visés par les temps de terrain. Nous avons ainsi demandé à nos étudiants de concevoir et produire, en dyades, des vidéos pédagogiques à destination des écoles du pays. Le but était de permettre à nos étudiants de développer les compétences nécessaires pour réaliser de telles ressources d’apprentissage et de de les mettre à disposition des écoles via Internet. Nous allons décrire, analyser et évaluer le dispositif mis en place, ainsi que les vidéos qui ont été produite. Nous allons également discuter des éventuelles leçons apprises qui conduiront à des adaptations dans notre formation. [less ▲]

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See detailProfessional development to promote innovative language teaching: examples from multilingual Luxembourg
Kirsch, Claudine UL

Scientific Conference (2020, November 13)

While multilingual programmes have been implemented in early childhood education in several countries in Europe, professionals may still be unsure of how to promote multilingualism and deal with language ... [more ▼]

While multilingual programmes have been implemented in early childhood education in several countries in Europe, professionals may still be unsure of how to promote multilingualism and deal with language diversity. There is a need for professional development (PD) which can influence the practitioners’ attitudes, knowledge and skills, and the quality of their teaching (Egert et al., 2018; Peleman et al., 2017). This presentation begins with an outline of several theoretical models of PD and explains why integrated models that are collaborative, inquiry-based, and performance-based are the most effective in contributing to change. I will then present a PD used in Luxembourg to help early childhood practitioners develop and implement multilingual pedagogies. The model, which comprised training sessions, network meetings, and coaching, aimed to deepen the practitioners’ understanding of multilingualism and language learning, familiarize them with translanguaging (García & Reid, 2019) and enable them to implement language and literacy activities in Luxembourgish, French and children’s home languages (Kirsch et al. forthcoming). Finally, I provide insights into the professional learning of two preschool teachers. The PD, the experience of engaging in multilingual activities, and the reflection on teaching and learning, enabled the teachers to develop a positive stance to multilingual education, design productive leaning environments based on social-constructivist theories, and monitor language use to guarantee responsible translanguaging (Kirsch 2020). [less ▲]

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See detailHow do pupils experience Technology-Based Assessments? Implications for methodological approaches to measuring the User Experience based on two case studies in France and Luxembourg
Lehnert, Florence Kristin UL; Lallemand, Carine UL; Fischbach, Antoine UL et al

Scientific Conference (2020, November 12)

Technology-based assessments (TBAs) are widely used in the education field to examine whether the learning goals were achieved. To design fair and child-friendly TBAs that enable pupils to perform at ... [more ▼]

Technology-based assessments (TBAs) are widely used in the education field to examine whether the learning goals were achieved. To design fair and child-friendly TBAs that enable pupils to perform at their best (i.a. independent of individual differences in computer literacy), we must ensure reliable and valid data collection. By reducing Human-Computer Interaction issues, we provide the best possible assessment conditions and user experience (UX) with the TBA and reduce educational inequalities. Good UX is thus a prerequisite for better data validity. Building on a recent case study, we investigated how pupils perform TBAs in real-life settings. We addressed the context-dependent factors resulting from the observations that ultimately influence the UX. The first case study was conducted with pupils age 6 to 7 in three elementary schools in France (n=61) in collaboration with la direction de l’évaluation, de la prospective et de la performance (DEPP). The second case study was done with pupils age 12 to 16 in four secondary schools in Luxembourg (n=104) in collaboration with the Luxembourg Centre for Educational Testing (LUCET). This exploratory study focused on the collection of various qualitative datasets to identify factors that influence the interaction with the TBA. We also discuss the importance of teachers’ moderation style and mere system-related characteristics, such as audio protocols of the assessment data. This study contribution comprises design recommendations and implications for methodological approaches to measuring pupils’ user experience during TBAs. [less ▲]

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See detailGeoGebraTAO: Geometry Learning using a Dynamic Adaptive ICT-Enhanced Environment to Promote String Differentiation of Children's Individual Pathways
Dording, Carole UL; Max, Charles Joseph UL; Kreis, Yves UL et al

Scientific Conference (2020, November 12)

In our project, we investigate the scientific validity of a specific self-built Adaptive Learning Tool in the field of dynamic geometry with a particular focus on the individual learning pathways of a ... [more ▼]

In our project, we investigate the scientific validity of a specific self-built Adaptive Learning Tool in the field of dynamic geometry with a particular focus on the individual learning pathways of a highly diverse student population. 164 children of Luxembourg elementary schools, aged between 10 and 13 years, acted as test-group and explored elementary geometric concepts in a sequence of learning assignments, created with the dynamic mathematics system GeoGebra integrated into the computer-assisted testing framework TAO. They actively built new knowledge in an autonomous way and at their own pace with only minor support interventions of their teacher. Based on easily exploitable data, collected within a sequence of exploratory learning assignments, the GeoGebraTAO tool analyses the answers provided by the child and performs a diagnostic of the child’s competencies in geometry. With respect to this outcome, the tool manages to identify children struggling with geometry concepts and subsequently proposes a differentiated individual pathway through scaffolding and feedback practices. Short videoclips aim at helping the children to better understand any task in case of need and can be watched voluntarily. Furthermore, a spaced repetition feature is another highly useful component. Pre- and post-test results show that the test-group, working with GeoGebraTAO, and a parallel working control-group, following a traditional paper-and-pencil geometry course, increased their geometry skills and knowledge through the training program; the test-group performed even better in items related to dynamic geometry. In addition, a more precise analysis within clusters, based on similar performances in both pre- and post-tests and the child’s progress within GeoGebraTAO activities, provides evidence of some common ways of working with our dynamic geometry tool, leading to overall improvement at an individualized level. [less ▲]

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See detailThe use of augmented reality, digital and physical modelling in schooling at home in early childhood in Echternach
Haas, Ben; Kreis, Yves UL; Zsolt, Lavicza

Scientific Conference (2020, November 12)

During the confinement of COVID-19, many efforts were made by teachers in elementary school to switch from in-school to schooling at home (Kreis et al., 2020). The use of educational technology in early ... [more ▼]

During the confinement of COVID-19, many efforts were made by teachers in elementary school to switch from in-school to schooling at home (Kreis et al., 2020). The use of educational technology in early childhood (cycle 1), however, is not yet a common practice in elementary schools in Luxemburg. Participation in online video conferences or the use of educational technologies relied in early childhood in significant parts on the disponibility and skills of parents. Younger students were experiencing difficulties in following-up courses requests in schooling at home. From previous research (Haas et al., In Preparation), we designed a conceptual framework on parent assisted remote teaching. Hence, we used these findings to work with 12 early childhood students (ages 4-6), their teachers and parents in schooling at home. Based on the four basic principles of Dienes’s theory of mathematics in physical and digital modelling (Lieban, 2019), we created mathematical modelling tasks with TinkerCad. During two weeks, we collected data through chat responses, web meetings and observations. In this presentation, we will explain insights and how further tasks in schooling at home in early childhood could benefit from this experience. [less ▲]

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See detailStudents’ Personality Relates to Experienced Variability in State Academic Self-Concept
Hausen, Jennifer UL; Möller, Jens; Greiff, Samuel UL et al

Scientific Conference (2020, November 11)

Attaining a positive academic self-concept (ASC) is linked to many desirable educational outcomes. Research on which student attributes relate to the formation of ASC is therefore considered to be central ... [more ▼]

Attaining a positive academic self-concept (ASC) is linked to many desirable educational outcomes. Research on which student attributes relate to the formation of ASC is therefore considered to be central. Past research on the association between personality traits and ASC has taken an interindividual perspective, while the intraindividual perspective has been disregarded. The present research explored the relation between students’ Big Five traits and intraindividual variability in state general-school ASC in everyday school life for the first time using intensive longitudinal data. We drew on N=294 German ninth and tenth graders who completed a three-week e-diary and a previously presented 60-item Big Five questionnaire (BFI-2; Danner et al., 2016; Soto & John, 2017) assessing Open-Mindedness, Conscientiousness, Extraversion, Agreeableness, and Negative Emotionality as well as their respective subfacets (i.e., resulting in 15 subfacets). To assess state ASC, students completed three items after every single lesson across four different subjects (resulting in Mlessons = 21.12). We ran six mixed-effects location scale models: one specified with all five Big Five domains, and five (one for each Big Five domain) with the subfacets as predictors of intraindividual variability in state ASC. We found that Open-Mindedness, Conscientiousness, Extraversion, and Negative Emotionality as well as at least one subfacet of each Big Five trait were significant predictors of levels of state ASC independently of students’ gender and reasoning ability, and the narrower subfacets Organization (Conscientiousness) and Depression (Negative Emotionality) predicted variability in state ASC independently of students’ gender and reasoning ability. These findings thus provide first evidence that students’ ASC undergoes short-term fluctuations from school lesson to school lesson and that this intraindividual variability can be partly explained by students’ personality. Our results thus contribute to a more complete map of the formation of ASC and the role of personality therein. [less ▲]

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See detailTackling educational inequalities using school effectiveness measures
Levy, Jessica UL; Mussack, Dominic UL; Brunner, Martin et al

Scientific Conference (2020, November 11)

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See detailScanning of questionnaires as a tool to identify difficult questions - lessons learned
Heinz, Andreas UL; van Duin, Claire UL; Catunda, Carolina UL et al

Scientific Conference (2020, November 10)

Background: In 2018, the Luxembourg HBSC team scanned the questionnaires to make the data available faster and to avoid entry errors. Scanning has been shown to be suitable for identifying difficult ... [more ▼]

Background: In 2018, the Luxembourg HBSC team scanned the questionnaires to make the data available faster and to avoid entry errors. Scanning has been shown to be suitable for identifying difficult questions. Objective: The presentation shows which questions were difficult to answer and what the difficulty was. Method: The questionnaires were scanned by student assistants and the data was validated by them if the scanning programme did not detect any errors. If errors occurred (e.g. missing answers or multiple answers), then these questionnaires were checked by HBSC team members. This gave us a systematic overview of which questions were difficult to answer. Results 1. The data from 10000 questionnaires were entered in 6 weeks (half the time needed compared to manual entry in 2014). 2. The MVPA question was frequently the subject of multiple answers. This may indicate that these students use the answer scale as a counting aid. 3. Students who state that they have never smoked in their lives often skip the question about tobacco use in the last month. This behaviour can be explained by Grice's conversational maxims. 4. Behaviours indicating that the answers are not serious (crossed-out questions, crosses outside the boxes, fun answers to open questions) are rare. Conclusions: Scanning is an efficient way to enter many questionnaires in a short time and high quality. Furthermore, it can help to discover difficult questions and to find out what the difficulty is. [less ▲]

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See detailThe health, well-being and life satisfaction of young people in Luxembourg before the COVID-19 pandemic and during deconfinement
Residori, Caroline UL; Schomaker, Léa UL; Samuel, Robin UL

Scientific Conference (2020, November 10)

Background: During 2020, most aspects of young people’s lives have been altered by the COVID-19 pandemic and the measures being implemented to contain it. Early studies on the effects of the COVID-19 ... [more ▼]

Background: During 2020, most aspects of young people’s lives have been altered by the COVID-19 pandemic and the measures being implemented to contain it. Early studies on the effects of the COVID-19 pandemic suggest that confinement (so-called “lockdowns”) affect health, well-being and life satisfaction. However, the current situation in many countries is not confinement but prolonged deconfinement with less strict but still considerable measures and recommendations. Objectives: The possible effects of this deconfinement on the health, well-being and life satisfaction of young people is the focus of this oral presentation, which is based on the YAC-Young Adults and COVID-19 study (see Residori et al., 2020). Methods: The study relies on data collected from a random sample of residents of Luxembourg for the Youth Survey Luxembourg in Mai-July 2019 (age-range: 16-29, n=2.800) and in July 2020 (age-range: 12-29, n=3768, preliminary data). The data was gathered via online survey and using the same items as the HBSC study (self-rated health, life satisfaction (Cantril ladder) and the WHO-5 Well-being Index) (Sozio et al., 2020). Results: The cross-sectional comparison of this representative data, explores the health, wellbeing and life satisfaction of young people in Luxembourg before and during the COVID-19 pandemic. The results are presented for the overall population and detailed by socio-demographic groups. For the 12-15-year-olds, the observed proportion reporting a low life satisfaction (<6) was, for example, 31.3% in 2020. This proportion has increased from 19.9% in 2019 to 25.5 % in 2020 for the 16-20-year-olds, from 23.9% to 35.3 % for the 21-25-year-olds and from 20.2% to 32.8% for the 26-29-year-olds. Conclusion: The presentation will conclude on a reflection of the links between the observed differences and the measures implemented to during deconfinement as well as the scientific and political relevance of the observed differences for Luxembourg and other countries. Literature: Residori, Caroline; Sozio, Maria E.; Schomaker, Lea; Samuel, Robin (2020): YAC – Young People and COVID-19. Preliminary Results of a Representative Survey of Adolescents and Young Adults in Luxembourg. University of Luxembourg: Esch-sur-Alzette Sozio, M., Procopio, A., & Samuel, R. (2020). Youth Survey Luxembourg – Technical Report 2019. Esch-sur-Alzette: University of Luxembourg. [less ▲]

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See detailDigitale Kommunikation im Alter – Erste Ergebnisse der CRISIS-Studie
Albert, Isabelle UL; Hoffmann, Martine; Murdock, Elke UL et al

Scientific Conference (2020, November 10)

In Folge der Kontaktbeschränkungen und Maßnahmen der sozialen Distanzierung zur Eindämmung der Corona Pandemie wurde vielfach von einem vermehrten Gebrauch digitaler Medien zur Aufrechterhaltung sozialer ... [more ▼]

In Folge der Kontaktbeschränkungen und Maßnahmen der sozialen Distanzierung zur Eindämmung der Corona Pandemie wurde vielfach von einem vermehrten Gebrauch digitaler Medien zur Aufrechterhaltung sozialer Kontakte berichtet. Die vorliegende Studie liefert erste Hinweise darauf, inwiefern sich das Kommunikationsverhalten älterer Menschen während der COVID-19 Krise verändert hat, wie der Gebrauch verschiedener Kommunikationsmittel mit der Reduktion von Einsamkeit und sozialer Isolation zusammenhängt und ob digitale Medien traditionelle Formen der Kommunikation verdrängen oder ergänzen. Im Juni 2020 wurden im Rahmen des vom FNR Luxemburg geförderten CRISIS-Projekts N = 611 in Privathaushalten lebende Personen im Alter zwischen 60 und 98 Jahren zu ihrem Erleben während der COVID-19 Krise befragt. Die Ergebnisse zeigen, dass das Telefon insgesamt zwar weiterhin das wichtigste Kommunikationsmittel älterer Menschen bleibt, jedoch nehmen digitale Medien insbesondere in der Gruppe der 60-69-jährigen einen wichtigen Stellenwert ein, um mit anderen in Kontakt zu bleiben. Dabei reduzierte ein gestiegener Gebrauch digitaler Medien (wie auch traditioneller Medien) das Gefühl, nicht genug Gesellschaft zu haben. Außerdem scheinen neue Arten der Kommunikation traditionelle Arten in unserer Zielgruppe nicht zu ersetzen, sondern sie ergänzen sich gegenseitig. Die Ergebnisse werden mit Bezug auf Maßnahmen zur Reduktion sozialer Isolation und Einsamkeit im Alter und im Kontext von COVID-19 diskutiert. [less ▲]

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See detailBeyond School Effects: Private Schooling, Segregation and Standardization of School Systems in Latin America
Ceron, Francisco UL

Scientific Conference (2020, November 07)

Introduction A considerable body of studies have shown that specific institutional arrangements in educational systems help in understanding cross-national differences in educational outcomes (Woessman ... [more ▼]

Introduction A considerable body of studies have shown that specific institutional arrangements in educational systems help in understanding cross-national differences in educational outcomes (Woessman 2003, Brunello and Checchi 2007, Bol and van de Werfhorst 2011, Bol et al 2014, Mijs 2016). The design of educational institutions may face policy trade-offs in the tasks of school systems that are served by them. Deregulation as privatization and school autonomy may enhance efficient sorting of students and then maximize learnings but at the cost of exacerbating social inequalities. A centralized education system may guarantee equality of educational opportunities, but it is not clear if it increases or hinder the overall performance level (Bol and van de Werfhorst 2011, Pedró et al 2015). This study is aimed to fill this gap, first, by departing from the widely supported assumption that the organization of educational systems affect, partly, the educational outcomes of students. Second, I focus on developing countries –Latin American countries- as we know less about the impact of institutions in educational outcomes in the region. Third, I attempt to address the following research question: what is the effect of the level of privatization increase achievement inequalities, given the level of standardization of the school systems in Latin American countries? Data and Methods I analyse data from the Tercer Estudio Regional Comparativo y Explicativo (TERCE), implemented in in year 2013 by UNESCO office in Santiago, Chile. TERCE is the most recent large-scale assessment that exclusively cover students and schools in Latin American countries. Fifteen countries participated: Argentina, Brazil, Chile, Colombia, Costa Rica, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, Guatemala, Honduras, Mexico, Nicaragua, Panama, Paraguay, Peru and Uruguay. Following the comparative research body, I use two-level hierarchical model to account for the multilevel structure of the data, students nested in schools, with random school effects and country fixed effects, to identify variability in the educational institutions of interest, given the small number of countries. The dependent variable is performance in mathematics in 6th grade as it is the subject that is most clearly learned at schools (Coleman 1975, Bol et al 2014), and seems to be more sensitive to socioeconomic background than other subjects. The main predictor is socioeconomic status of student, and I control for several indicators related to learning home environment, and sociodemographic variables. At school level, I control for several organizational characteristics and social composition. Findings The main findings show that country-specific configurations of school systems are associated to difference in mathematics achievement. Differences between schools in performance are partly explained by differences at country level. In this regard, I have chosen two important dimensions of school systems, for the Latin American region: the level of standardization and privatization. These results confirm some recent findings that achievement inequality is larger in school systems with a great level of differentiation between schools, in which the stratification triggered by the private sector is one important indicator (Chmielewski and Reardon, 2016). In case of the level of standardization results show that is associated to a lesser degree of achievement inequality. However, the main finding points to persistent inequalities as much as private sector in school systems is bigger. Further, the models predict that these inequalities are not decreasing as the standardization level increases. In this respect, I also find support for a diminishing effect of policies that points to equalization of opportunities (Woessman 2003, Bol and van de Werfhorst 2011). The results suggest higher inequalities as the stratification induced by private school sector increases. These effects are still significant after adding school level controls, which suggest that over and above school processes, uneven between school sorting induces by private sector. [less ▲]

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See detailCovid-19 in Portuguese educational scenario: actions, responses and reflections
de Albuquerque Trigo, Maiza UL

Scientific Conference (2020, November 06)

On March 13th, the Portuguese government declared that children were going home, and classes would resume after Easter in an online/distance mode. Children were sent home and the system panicked. As a ... [more ▼]

On March 13th, the Portuguese government declared that children were going home, and classes would resume after Easter in an online/distance mode. Children were sent home and the system panicked. As a majority of teachers are over 45 years old, trainings on online platforms were made available, as well as the platforms to be used. In the meantime, the government announced a plan to broadcast via television general lessons starting from April 20th (two 40-minute lessons per day per school year grouping, for primary and elementary school classes only). Secondary classes were mainly online, but 11th and 12th graders went back to school for a few weeks to prepare themselves to the national exams. As the school year came to an end, new guidelines are being outlined and, at this time, each school has to develop their own return and contingency plans (accordingly to the Health Authorities guidelines). This presentation will discuss the responses in Portugal with a reflective focus on education actions and effects. [less ▲]

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See detailRound table: Museum of Self-isolation
Cauvin, Thomas UL

Scientific Conference (2020, November 06)

Detailed reference viewed: 15 (0 UL)
See detailCommunication, public engagement and public history
Cauvin, Thomas UL

Scientific Conference (2020, November 06)

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See detailIWalk in Luxembourg: Jewish public history in forgotten places
Bronec, Jakub UL

Scientific Conference (2020, November 06)

The contribution will introduce the process of designing two IWalk tours with bachelor students in Luxembourg. The presentation will contain the digital source criticism and new perspectives of digital ... [more ▼]

The contribution will introduce the process of designing two IWalk tours with bachelor students in Luxembourg. The presentation will contain the digital source criticism and new perspectives of digital hermeneutics related to themes of individual stops. The students were divided into two working groups, with each group assigned to a different area. Group A was in charge of designing a virtual tour in Luxembourg City and group B created one for the town of Esch-sur-Alzette. The participants took pictures of current buildings and locations associated with Jewish war history and compared them with original historical photos taken before and during the war. The students were encouraged to reflect on how the appearance and function of certain buildings had changed over time. Besides critical analysis of all pros and cons, I will introduce MAXQDA, a tool for qualitative data analysis to be an invaluable assistant for easier pre-selection of interviews. From a methodological perspective, we were able to judge the relevance of interviews for our work. Students also learned to link different text passages to each other as well as to other documents, educational websites, images or geographical locations. When several students are working with one data set, it is important to create a clear system of memos, codes and intercoder agreements. For a comparative analysis, students used a unified thematic coding tree they had created themselves. The use of a common code book tree enables them to find thematic intersections in their work. The contribution will also demonstrate the purpose of pre-question and post-questions, which make users consider the content of each IWalk stop. [less ▲]

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See detailAnalysing transnational Events through Web archives
Schafer, Valerie UL

Scientific Conference (2020, November 04)

As a co-PI of the WARCnet project, programme chair of this second WARCnet meeting and head of WG2 dedicated to "Analysing transnational Events", Valérie Schafer will give an overview of the challenges ... [more ▼]

As a co-PI of the WARCnet project, programme chair of this second WARCnet meeting and head of WG2 dedicated to "Analysing transnational Events", Valérie Schafer will give an overview of the challenges, issues, achievements, results, case studies, next steps of WG2 since the launch of the WARCnet project. [less ▲]

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See detailIs there a bilingual advantage in mathematics?
Martini, Sophie Frédérique UL; Keller, Ulrich UL; Ugen, Sonja UL

Scientific Conference (2020, November)

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See detailHPC Multi-physics Biomass Furnace simulations as a Service
Besseron, Xavier UL; Rusche, Henrik; Peters, Bernhard UL et al

Scientific Conference (2020, November)

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