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See detailPain Processing in Older Age – Evidence from Event-Related Potentials
Dierolf, Angelika UL; Rischer, Katharina Miriam UL; González-Rolán, Ana Maria et al

Scientific Conference (2021, June)

Aging is known to affect neurobiological and physiological aspects of pain perception and has been associated with reduced pain sensitivity and a deterioration of descending pain inhibitory mechanisms. To ... [more ▼]

Aging is known to affect neurobiological and physiological aspects of pain perception and has been associated with reduced pain sensitivity and a deterioration of descending pain inhibitory mechanisms. To investigate age differences in neural electrophysiological correlates of pain processing, we induced acute pain in healthy older (60 yrs+) and younger adults (18 to 35 yrs), using short transdermal electrical pulses administered to the inner forearm, with individually adjusted stimulation intensities. Participants received alternating blocks of painful and non-painful control stimulation and rated the intensity and unpleasantness of each stimulus on two visual analog scales. Pain-related evoked potentials were recorded with a 64-channel EEG. Preliminary results indicate that younger and older participants rated painful stimuli more intensive and unpleasant compared to the control stimulation, with older adults showing a slight habituation over time. In younger adults, ERP amplitudes (N2, P2 P3) of painful stimulation were enhanced compared to non- painful stimulation. In contrast, older participants showed generally reduced ERPs, no difference between pain and non-painful stimulation and by tendency longer latencies for painful stimulation. This suggests that nociceptive neural processing is altered in aging, while the reported pain perception is unaffected. Given that aging is also associated with a decline of cognitive functions and PFC volume and activity changes, this could have implications for the efficacy of cognitive pain modulation. Altogether, our results highlight the need for a deeper understanding of the mechanisms underlying pain processing in older adults, and how these age-related changes affect (cognitive) pain treatments in this population. [less ▲]

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See detailExploiting Jamming Attacks for Energy Harvesting in Massive MIMO Systems
Al-Hraishawi, Hayder UL; Chatzinotas, Symeon UL; Ottersten, Björn UL

Scientific Conference (2021, June)

In this paper, the performance of an RF energy harvesting scheme for multi-user massive multiple-input multiple-output (MIMO) is investigated in the presence of multiple active jammers. The key idea is to ... [more ▼]

In this paper, the performance of an RF energy harvesting scheme for multi-user massive multiple-input multiple-output (MIMO) is investigated in the presence of multiple active jammers. The key idea is to exploit the jamming transmissions as an energy source to be harvested at the legitimate users. To this end, the achievable uplink sum rate expressions are derived in closed-form for two different antenna configurations. An optimal time-switching policy is also proposed to ensure user-fairness in terms of both harvested energy and achievable rate. Besides, the essential trade-off between the harvested energy and achievable sum rate are quantified in closed-form. Our analysis reveals that the massive MIMO systems can make use of RF signals of the jamming attacks for boosting the amount of harvested energy at the served users. Numerical results illustrate the effectiveness of the derived closed-form expressions over Monte-Carlo simulations. [less ▲]

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See detailApplying synchronization in branch and trunk bus networks: an experimental analysis
Laskaris, Georgios; Rinaldi, Marco; Viti, Francesco UL

Scientific Conference (2021, June)

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See detailCultural identity in the context of migration – The case of Portuguese first generation immigrants in Luxembourg and their second generation children
Albert, Isabelle UL; Barros, Stephanie

Scientific Conference (2021, June)

While first generation immigrants carry a cultural heritage to their receiving country, their children are confronted with different cultural influences during their formative years. How does this so ... [more ▼]

While first generation immigrants carry a cultural heritage to their receiving country, their children are confronted with different cultural influences during their formative years. How does this so-called second-generation experience their cultural identities compared to their parents? To tackle this question, the present study focused on first- and second-generation Portuguese migrants living in Luxembourg. The sample comprises n = 72 PT young adult children (mean age M = 28.2, SD = 7.9; 61.1% female) who participated in the FNR-funded IRMA-project together with their parents (n = 70 PT mothers and n = 65 PT fathers). An adapted version of the bicultural identity orientation scale was employed to assess three dimensions of bicultural identity - compatible, conflicted and frame-switching. We examined patterns of identity constructions of first and second generation by use of cluster analysis, resulting in four profiles: blended, alternating, separated and ambivalent biculturals. Whereas second generation young adults were represented in each typology, parents were mostly found in the alternating or separated clusters. Clusters of parents and their children will be compared and factors contributing to parent-child congruence/incongruence identified. Results will be discussed considering regulatory processes of subjective well-being and different migration experiences in light of generation and age. [less ▲]

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See detailCognitive distraction from pain: An fMRI study on the role of age and executive functions
Rischer, Katharina Miriam UL; Dierolf, Angelika UL; González-Roldán, Ana M. et al

Scientific Conference (2021, June)

Completing a cognitive task has been shown to be a powerful strategy to reduce concurrent pain. This reduction in pain is assumed to result from a competition between the painful stimulus and the ... [more ▼]

Completing a cognitive task has been shown to be a powerful strategy to reduce concurrent pain. This reduction in pain is assumed to result from a competition between the painful stimulus and the distractive task for attentional and executive resources mediated by the prefrontal cortex (PFC), a region that is particularly affected by age-related grey matter atrophy. In the present study, we investigated the role of age-related changes in gray matter volume and executive functions in modulating the efficacy of distraction from pain. In a first session, young and older adults completed a battery of neuropsychological tests. In a second session, we acquired functional brain images while participants completed a working memory task with two levels of cognitive load (low vs. high load) and concurrently received individually adjusted heat stimuli (innocuous vs. painful) to their lower arm. While we found no age-related differences in the distraction effect size on the behavioural level, young adults showed a larger neural distraction effect in several regions involved in pain processing, including the insula, caudate and midcingulate cortex. Interestingly, older adults with better executive functions, particularly, better inhibitory control abilities, showed a larger neural distraction effect in the insula, thalamus and primary somatosensory cortex, and more activation in frontal clusters during the high load task. Taken together, these findings suggest that age alters the neural mechanisms underlying cognitive distraction from pain, and that the magnitude of these changes may be dependent on the preservation of executive functions. [less ▲]

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See detailFirst results of the iterative STEAM design process in 3D modelling and printing with pre-service teachers
Kreis, Yves UL; Haas, Ben; Lavicza, Zsolt

Scientific Conference (2021, May 28)

While we examined mathematical modelling of architectures with CAD software during the last years, we intended in our higher education courses in pre-service elementary school teachers' initial training ... [more ▼]

While we examined mathematical modelling of architectures with CAD software during the last years, we intended in our higher education courses in pre-service elementary school teachers' initial training to expand the complexity of the modelling tasks. In addition, our previous research results indicated a high difference between the quality and functionality of designs by students. Therefore, we investigated the design process in 3D modelling and printing. Based on the industrial iterative design process (e.g., design of a pen), we became aware of the importance of iterative process milestones, quality controls, discussions and peer evaluations. Therefore, we created a remote teaching course for pre-service teachers to design complex objects (e.g., functionality) and create learning settings and tasks based on an iterative design process concept. We will present the first results and reflections at this conference. [less ▲]

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See detailScaling of urban heat island & NO2 with urban population: a meta-analysis
Wei, Yufei UL; Caruso, Geoffrey UL; Lemoy, Rémi

Scientific Conference (2021, May 28)

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See detailMetadiscourse by native and non-native English speakers: importance marking in lectures
Deroey, Katrien UL; Johnson, Jane Helen

Scientific Conference (2021, May 27)

This talk has a dual purpose. In addition to mapping the use of one type of metadiscourse, viz. importance markers, across ‘native’ and ‘English Medium Instruction’ (EMI) lecture corpora, we elaborate on ... [more ▼]

This talk has a dual purpose. In addition to mapping the use of one type of metadiscourse, viz. importance markers, across ‘native’ and ‘English Medium Instruction’ (EMI) lecture corpora, we elaborate on analytical issues related to studying metadiscourse in spoken and disciplinary discourse. ‘Importance markers’ (Deroey & Taverniers, 2012) are lexicogrammatical metadiscursive devices combining discourse organization with evaluation along a ‘parameter of importance or relevance’ (Thompson and Hunston, 2000, p. 24). In lectures, they help students identify key content, which is useful for allocating processing resources while listening to what are typically dense monologues that require processing in real time. This in turns is likely to benefit understanding, note-taking and retention. Comparing the use of importance markers in a single-discipline corpus of engineering lectures by ‘native’ speakers and EMI lecturers, our aim was to contribute to the limited insights into the linguistic features of EMI lecture discourse generally and metadiscourse important for lecture discourse organization and hence lecture listening, specifically. Both researchers independently identified potential importance markers manually in lectures 46 engineering lectures (364,542 words) delivered in the Italy, Malaysia, the UK, and New Zealand,. Agreed instances were tagged and the tagged corpus imported into Sketch Engine to facilitate further analysis. Overall, native speakers and EMI lecturers differed little in importance marker frequency, range, types, and lexemes. In both corpora, the predominant verb marker was V n/clause (e.g. remember they don't know each other). The main difference was the far more common use of the listener-oriented 2 pers pron V n/clause marker (you must understand how to apply this one) by the non-native speakers but this was largely due to idiolectic variation. Contrary to most corpus linguistic metadiscourse studies, we report the inevitable analytical difficulties when identifying and classifying metadiscourse. Issues include establishing a definition that is broad enough to capture the various realizations of a metadiscursive function, while not ‘opening the floodgates’ to include instances that are not representative or that render the study unfeasible. For us this included distinguishing between evaluation of discourse and ‘real world’ entities, excluding very frequent phrases that could be viewed as importance markers but in this discipline probably served another function, and establishing a continuum of highlighting ‘force’. These considerations necessitated careful manual analysis of a relatively small corpus, which however means that generalization are limited and idiolectic bias more likely. [less ▲]

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See detailDevelopment of knowledge and subjectivity by analysis of teacher-movies
Weber, Jean-Marie UL

Scientific Conference (2021, May 22)

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See detailLinking Executive Functions and Math Intelligence in Preschool Children: A Meta-Analysis
Emslander, Valentin UL; Scherer, Ronny

Scientific Conference (2021, May 20)

Background: Executive functions (i.e., response inhibition, attention shifting, working memory updating) have shown to be related to the mathematical component of intelligence, which, in turn, is ... [more ▼]

Background: Executive functions (i.e., response inhibition, attention shifting, working memory updating) have shown to be related to the mathematical component of intelligence, which, in turn, is predictive of various competences later in life. While this relation has already been thoroughly researched in school students and adults, a comprehensive research synthesis on preschool children—a group for which the assessment of these constructs is more challenging—is still missing. Evidence on the differentiation of cognitive skills over time suggests a differential relation of the three executive functions with math intelligence in older but not in younger children. It remains unclear, however, whether and which one of the three executive functions is more closely related to math intelligence in preschool children. Further research gaps concern the measurement of both executive functions and math intelligence in preschool children, as they cannot complete reading- and writing-based questionnaires. Addressing this measurement challenge, a plethora of inventive measurements has been used to assess both cognitive skills. These measurement differences might also have an influence on the relation between executive functions and math intelligence. Objectives: With our meta-analysis, we aimed to clarify the relation between executive functions and math intelligence in preschool children. Further, we wanted to investigate the influence of different measurement methods on this relation and look into the specific links of inhibition, shifting, and updating with math intelligence more closely. Research questions: 1. To what extent are inhibition, shifting, and updating (as a composite and separately) related to math intelligence in preschool children? (Overall correlations) 2. Which sample, study, and measurement characteristics moderate this relation? (Heterogeneity and moderators) 3. How much variation in math intelligence do inhibition, shifting, and updating explain jointly? (Model testing) Methods: We examined the relation between executive functions and math intelligence for 268 effect sizes from 29 studies for a total sample of 25,510 preschool children. Specifically, we synthesized the corresponding correlations by means of three-level random-effects meta-analyses (RQ 1) and examined the study, sample, and measurement characteristics as possible moderators of this relation between EFs and math intelligence via mixed-effects modeling (RQ 2). Further, we performed meta-analytic structural equation modeling to investigate the joint and differential effects inhibition, shifting, and updating on math intelligence (RQ 3). Results: We found executive functions and math intelligence to correlate moderately in preschool children (r = .35). Investigating inhibition, shifting, and updating separately also revealed moderate average correlations to math intelligence (r = .30, r = .38 , and r = .36, respectively). While we did not find age to explain significant amounts of heterogeneity, four measurement characteristics moderated the relation between executive function and math intelligence. When considered jointly through meta-analytic structural equation modeling, the relations of inhibition, shifting, and updating to math intelligence were similar. Conclusions and Implications: By presenting evidence for a significant relation between executive functions and math intelligence also in preschool children, our findings contribute to the discussion on the differentiation of cognitive skills. They highlight the importance of considering measurement characteristics when researching executive functions and math intelligence. Further, we could not confirm that inhibition, shifting, and updating are differentially related to math intelligence. Further research is needed to clarify the impact of age on the relation between executive functions and math intelligence. [less ▲]

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See detailTable ronde : comment faire réseau autour des archives du web ?
Schafer, Valerie UL

Scientific Conference (2021, May 17)

Table ronde : comment faire réseau autour des archives du web ? Intervenants : Emmanuelle Bermès (Bibliothèque nationale de France), Dominique Cardon (medialab, Sciences Po), Stéphanie Groudiev (Campus ... [more ▼]

Table ronde : comment faire réseau autour des archives du web ? Intervenants : Emmanuelle Bermès (Bibliothèque nationale de France), Dominique Cardon (medialab, Sciences Po), Stéphanie Groudiev (Campus Condorcet), Valérie Schafer (Université du Luxembourg) [less ▲]

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See detailDigital Cultural Heritage and the Politics of Digitisation
Zaagsma, Gerben UL

Scientific Conference (2021, May 11)

This talk deals with a question that is becoming increasingly important for historians who work with digitised cultural heritage: what are the politics of digitisation and what are its implications for ... [more ▼]

This talk deals with a question that is becoming increasingly important for historians who work with digitised cultural heritage: what are the politics of digitisation and what are its implications for historical research? Is the often-lauded democratising potential of digitisation also offset by challenges, inherent in selection processes that might privilege the digitisation of heritage corresponding to existing national master narratives, the availability of funding and/or the priorities set by cultural policies and certain research agendas? How does transnational heritage fit into this picture when most digitisation projects are, in one way or another, nationally framed? What biases can digital archives introduce in our work and how does that differ from issues of bias and selection in the ‘paper’ archive? A key point to highlight is that professional historians can and should be more open to learn from the experience of digital archivists and librarians who are at the forefront of the digital turn in heritage wsk. the talk will conclude with a brief plea and suggestion for transparancy guidelines for digital resources. [less ▲]

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See detailMultiple vulnerabilities: The effects of neighborhood structural changes upon older residents' mental health and perceptions of the broader community
Settels, Jason UL

Scientific Conference (2021, May 06)

Aims: Neighborhoods’ structural conditions are consequential for their social circumstances and residents’ well-being. Neighborhood effects might be accentuated among older residents because their daily ... [more ▼]

Aims: Neighborhoods’ structural conditions are consequential for their social circumstances and residents’ well-being. Neighborhood effects might be accentuated among older residents because their daily activities and social lives are more confined to their immediate communities. This study examines how changing neighborhood socioeconomic disadvantage affects older residents’ depression and stress, as well as perceptions of neighborhood context. Methods: This study employed waves 2 (2010-2011) and 3 (2015-2016) of the National Social Life, Health, and Aging Project survey (N=2,357) and fixed-effects linear regression models to study these relationships. Results: While rising neighborhood socioeconomic disadvantage was associated with more depression and stress, it was negatively associated with overall neighborhood social capital and neighborhood social cohesion, and was only associated with lower perceptions of neighborhood safety among respondents who relocated to new neighborhoods. Conclusions: Beyond cross-sectional associations, changing neighborhood socioeconomic disadvantage is associated with changes in mental health and perceptions of neighborhood social context. [less ▲]

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See detailConsiderations on Dynamic Pricing in Carsharing Operations
Giorgione, Giulio UL; Viti, Francesco UL

Scientific Conference (2021, May)

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See detailOffice Agents: Personal Office Vitality Sensors with Intent
Stamhuis, Sjoerd; Brombacher, Hans; Vos, Steven et al

Scientific Conference (2021, May)

In smart office buildings, almost every aspect of the environment can be assessed and adjusted by sensors. Yet employees rarely have access to the data collected to act upon it. It is also unclear what ... [more ▼]

In smart office buildings, almost every aspect of the environment can be assessed and adjusted by sensors. Yet employees rarely have access to the data collected to act upon it. It is also unclear what they would find meaningful to follow the recommendations on healthy work conditions and behavior, while productivity is the priority. The Office Agents are a set of artefacts placed on the employee’s desk, which capture data about the office environment. Air quality, sound level, light exposure, productivity, and physical activity level are measured to provide office workers with feedback on the ‘best’ working conditions. Using speculative design and Objects with Intent, the employee engages in a negotiation with the Office Agents based on the office ecosystem. Through this project and interactivity session, we open a debate on the use of sensors in office environments and the stakes around office vitality from the viewpoint of the employees. [less ▲]

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See detailVirtual reality gaming for pain distraction - Investigation of attentional and psychophysiological effects
Holl, Elisabeth UL; Rischer, Katharina Miriam UL; Battistutta, Layla UL et al

Scientific Conference (2021, May)

Virtual reality has been shown to be a powerful method to divert attention away from pain (Malloy & Milling, 2010) and has been used successfully to temporally relieve patients from pain in clinical ... [more ▼]

Virtual reality has been shown to be a powerful method to divert attention away from pain (Malloy & Milling, 2010) and has been used successfully to temporally relieve patients from pain in clinical settings. However, little is known about the underlying attentional processes involved in pain processing in virtual reality. Therefore, as one of the first studies, this project investigates the role of especially cognitive factors influencing distraction from pain. N = 90 healthy participants played the video game Subnautica in two virtual reality conditions (high vs. low cognitive load). To assess the distraction effect, pain thresholds and psychophysiological measures were assessed during play. Additionally, executive functions and self-reported measures on, e.g., presence, simulation sickness and pain-related subjects were assessed. Results suggest that interactive virtual reality games are a potential tool to alter pain processing, regardless of the level of cognitive load. [less ▲]

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See detailThe Hormones of Dark Souls: The Dark Tetrad and Violent Gaming Effects on Aggression, Cortisol and Testosterone Levels
Wagener, Gary; Felten, Andrea; Melzer, André UL

Scientific Conference (2021, May)

Although playing violent video games may lead to detrimental effects on cognition, emotion and behavior, the role of hormones and its interplay with personality characteristics is not well understood. An ... [more ▼]

Although playing violent video games may lead to detrimental effects on cognition, emotion and behavior, the role of hormones and its interplay with personality characteristics is not well understood. An experimental study tested how playing a violent versus non-violent video game affects cortisol and testosterone levels, whether these hormonal changes increase implicit aggressive cognition, and whether Dark Tetrad personality traits moderate these effects. In an experimental design, 54 male participants played either a violent or a non-violent video game. Participants provided salivary samples at the beginning of the experiment (T1), right after 25 minutes of gameplay (T2), and 20 minutes after that (T3). There were no significant effects on implicit aggressive cognition. However, participants in the violent game condition had a significant decrease in cortisol levels (T1 to T2) and a significant negative trend in cortisol levels from T1 to T3. Participants with higher Machiavellianism scores in the violent condition had a stronger decrease in cortisol (T1 to T2). In contrast, participants with higher Machiavellianism scores in the non-violent condition had a higher increase in cortisol (T1 to T2). The present findings illustrate the complex interplay between personality, hormones, and game content, thus specifying current notions on violent game effects. [less ▲]

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See detailAn equilibrium model for Mobility-as-a-Service
Bandiera, Claudia UL; Connors, Richard UL; Viti, Francesco UL

Scientific Conference (2021, May)

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See detailMotivation to Play Scale (MOPS): Measuring Gaming Motivation With a Comprehensive Instrument
Holl, Elisabeth UL; Wagener, Gary Lee UL; Melzer, André UL

Scientific Conference (2021, May)

With the growing interest in gaming, the motivation why people play has become a focus of research. Scales assessing gaming motivation are mostly based on either motivation theories or on self-constructed ... [more ▼]

With the growing interest in gaming, the motivation why people play has become a focus of research. Scales assessing gaming motivation are mostly based on either motivation theories or on self-constructed items adapted to specific genres. Despite the amount of existing scales, measures often lack validation or leave out important and novel motives. Therefore, the Motivation to Play Scale (MOPS), a work-in-progress project, aims at identifying a holistic instrument validated by systematically collecting and evaluating already existing items. A first evaluation survey (N = 555) resulted in preliminary version of the MOPS measuring 14 gaming motives (e.g., competition, escapism) using 59 items (α = .94). [less ▲]

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See detailThe impact of COVID-19 in the migration area in EU and OECD countries
Sommarribas, Adolfo UL; Sheridan, Anne

Scientific Conference (2021, April 30)

The European Migration Network (EMN) and the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) have published updated information on the impact of COVID-19 in the migration area. The new ... [more ▼]

The European Migration Network (EMN) and the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) have published updated information on the impact of COVID-19 in the migration area. The new Umbrella Inform completes the joint EMN and OECD Inform series between on the impact of COVID-19 on migration and asylum in the EU Member States and non-EU OECD countries throughout 2020. Updates include changes in border procedures, provision of COVID-19 related healthcare services to migrants, the shifting landscape of the labour market, international protection, international students, and return issues. [less ▲]

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See detailTeacher education in translanguaging to achieve social justice?
Aleksic, Gabrijela UL

Scientific Conference (2021, April 29)

Multilingual and multicultural settings are an ever-growing reality all over the world. The potential of migrant’s multilingual and multicultural heritage can be unfolded if the citizens of the host ... [more ▼]

Multilingual and multicultural settings are an ever-growing reality all over the world. The potential of migrant’s multilingual and multicultural heritage can be unfolded if the citizens of the host country are open to it. However, immigrants are often confronted with cultural and linguistic supremacy while nationals of the host country are afraid of a loss or ‘dilution’ of their existing culture and language. The increase of multilingual and multicultural settings as well as the difficulty in overcoming this fear impelled scholars of various sciences to conduct extensive research on the issues of marginalization and cultural imperialism. Researchers in educational sciences, most notably Li Wei and Ofelia García, have opposed the linguistic and cultural hegemony in education through the promotion of translanguaging pedagogy. Translanguaging as a term describes both the natural discourse of bi- and multilingual people through the use of their entire linguistic repertoire and the pedagogy that makes use of these unique linguistic repertoires of bi- and multilingual students to foster learning, comprehension and academic achievement (Celic & Selzer, 2011; Otheguy, García, & Reid, 2015). The use of a translanguaging pedagogy in multicultural and multilingual settings proves beyond useful to disrupt linguistic hegemonies and socio-politically constructed named languages by giving bi- and multilingual students a voice and space to prosper, learn and develop their bi- and multilingual identities (García, 2019). The need of a translanguaging pedagogy becomes necessary in countries such as the small trilingual Grand-Duchy of Luxembourg. The culturally and linguistically highly diverse country with its three official languages (Luxembourgish, French, and German) sees a staggering gap between the school achievements of native and non-native children, forcing even the government to implement mandatory multilingual education in preschools (PISA, 2019). The development of Luxembourgish, familiarization of French and valorization of the home languages of the children have become an official requirement for preschool teachers since 2017. Given that 64 % of four-year olds in Luxembourg do not speak Luxembourgish at home, multiple projects and courses have launched to aid teachers in the practical application of this new law (MENJE, 2018). Thus, we developed our professional development course in translanguaging for preschool teachers in Luxembourg to support their work with multilingual children and their families. The disruption of the linguistic hegemony in Luxembourgish classrooms was implicitly carried through three distinct objectives of the project : (1) 18-hours professional development course in translanguaging to 38 preschool teachers from June to December 2019 divided into 7 sessions (multilingual ecology, home-school collaboration, multilingual brain, multilingual oracy and literacy), (2) active inclusion of children’s families to foster home-school collaboration through parents’ questionnaires and interviews and the promotion of partnerships between families and teachers in the course, and (3) support of children’s linguistic, socio-emotional and cognitive development and engagement in the classroom through early literacy and numeracy tests in the school and home languages, and video observations of classroom activities and interactions. As the goal of social justice was thematized implicitly throughout the course given that most teachers are monolingually and monoculturally biased to be confronted with the topic of cultural imperialism and linguistic hegemony head-on, we tried to assess the teachers change in attitudes through the use of focus group and questionnaires at the beginning and the end of the course. This is the present focus. As the voluntary participation in a translanguaging course would already suggest, the preliminary results of our project show an overall openness of the participating teachers towards other languages and cultures and an awareness of the need of inclusion of the home languages of the children for the benefit of their development and well-being. The results from teacher questionnaires show that there was a significant increase in positive attitudes towards multilingualism (t(35) = -3.83, p < .001) and significant decrease in exclusive interest in Luxembourgish (t(35) = 3.45, p < .001), after the course. This openness and awareness do, however, not automatically translate into social justice as only a very small number of teachers was open to the idea of disrupting linguistic hegemonies and in the video observations unconsciously put all the languages at a same level. The majority of the participants did change their views about their multilingual students (from deficit to richness) realizing that the inclusion of children’s home languages and cultures is a valuable tool for comprehension, learning and socio-emotional development instead of only being a stepping-stone until full mastery of Luxembourgish is achieved. Yet, their strong focus on the development of Luxembourgish and its absolute untouchable status as the language that receives the most recognition did not change. Beside the linguistic superiority of Luxembourgish, even linguistic hierarchies became blatantly obvious during video observations, showing just how much work still needs to be done for teachers to truly interiorize the potentially harmful consequences of linguistic hegemonies and hierarchies. It is our responsibility as researchers to continue to work with teachers, and involve parents, children, and their communities. Change in attitudes and raise of social responsibility and justice is a process. At this point of our project, we see it in fragments, and it is important for all of us not to disrupt it. If we do, the networks that we created will dissolve and the positive impact on multilingual children’s lives and their families could disappear. Therefore, we see two opportunities to continue the work on translanguaging pedagogy by: (1) organizing an additional training for teachers in which we will analyze the video observations to focus on power relations, and (2) organizing a teacher/parent conference in which we will facilitate the discussion on translanguaging pedagogy. Educational and social contexts are rapidly changing and we believe that our professional development course in translanguaging pedagogy is contributing to the process of adaptation to these changes by explicitly inviting us to be more socially responsible and fair. The Conference will give us the opportunity to present the final results and future directions of the project. References Celic, C., & Selzer, K. (2011). Translanguaging: A CUNY-NYSIEB Guide for Educators. New York: CUNY-NYSIEB. García, O. (2019). Translanguaging: a coda to the code?, Classroom Discourse, 10(3-4), 369-373, doi: 10.1080/19463014.2019.1638277 Ministry of National Education, Childhood and Youth [MENJE]. (2018). Les chiffres clés de l'Éducation nationale: statistiques et indicateurs - Année scolaire 2016-2017 [Key numbers of the national education: statistics and indicators – School year 2016-20167]. Retrieved from http://www.men.public.lu/fr/actualites/publications/themes-transversaux/statistiques-analyses/chiffres-cles/index.html OECD (2019). PISA 2018 Results (Volume I): What students know and can do. PISA, OECD Publishing: Paris. doi: https://doi.org/10.1787/5f07c754-en Otheguy, R., García, O., & Reid, W. (2015). Clarifying translanguaging and deconstructing named langauges: A perspective from linguistics. Applied Linguistic Review, 6(3), 281–307. [less ▲]

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See detailDefining a Manageable, Dynamic Chemical Space for Exposomics
Schymanski, Emma UL

Scientific Conference (2021, April 27)

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See detailMulti-GNSS Slant Wet Delay Retrieval Using Multipath Mitigation Maps
Hunegnaw, Addisu UL; Ejigu, Yohannes Getachew; Teferle, Felix Norman UL et al

Scientific Conference (2021, April 24)

The conventional Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) processing is typically contaminated with errors due to atmospheric variabilities, such as those associated with the mesoscale phenomena. These ... [more ▼]

The conventional Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) processing is typically contaminated with errors due to atmospheric variabilities, such as those associated with the mesoscale phenomena. These errors are manifested in the parameter estimates, including station coordinates and atmospheric products. To enhance the accuracy of these GNSS products further, a better understanding of the local-scale atmospheric variability is necessary. As part of multi-GNSS processing, station coordinates, carrier phase ambiguities, orbits, zenith total delay (ZTD) and horizontal gradients are the main parameters of interest. Here, ZTD is estimated as the average zenith delay along the line-of-sight to every observed GNSS satellite mapped to the vertical while the horizontal gradients are estimated in NS and EW directions and provide a means to partly account for the azimuthally inhomogeneous atmosphere. However, a better atmospheric description is possible by evaluating the slant path delay (SPD) or slant wet delay (SWD) along GNSS ray paths, which are not resolved by ordinary ZTD and gradient analysis. SWD is expected to provide better information about the inhomogeneous distribution of water vapour that is disregarded when retrieving ZTD and horizontal gradients. Usually, SWD cannot be estimated directly from GNSS processing as the number of unknown parameters exceeds the number of observations. Thus, SWD is generally calculated from ZTD for each satellite and may be dominated by un-modelled atmospheric delays, clock errors, unresolved carrier-phase ambiguities and near-surface multipath scattering. In this work, we have computed multipath maps by stacking individual post-fit carrier residuals incorporating the signals from four GNSS constellations, i.e. BeiDou, Galileo, Glonass and GPS. We have selected a subset of global International GNSS Service (IGS) stations capable of multi-GNSS observables located in different climatic zones. The multipath effects are reduced by subtracting the stacked multipath maps from the raw post-fit carrier phase residuals. We demonstrate that the multipath stacking technique results in significantly reduced variations in the one-way post-fit carrier phase residuals. This is particularly evident for lower elevation angles, thus, producing a retrieval method for SWD that is less affected by site-specific multipath effects. We show a positive impact on SWD estimation using our multipath maps during increased atmospheric inhomogeneity as induced by severe weather events. [less ▲]

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See detailSoziale Kohäsion und Exklusion im luxemburgischen Wohnungswesen
Dujardin, Céline UL

Scientific Conference (2021, April 23)

Kontext und Problematik Im Großherzogtum Luxemburg ist die Nachfrage an bezahlbarem Wohnraum deutlich höher als das bestehende Angebot (Manet, 2017; Reuter, 2017). Für die finanziell benachteiligten ... [more ▼]

Kontext und Problematik Im Großherzogtum Luxemburg ist die Nachfrage an bezahlbarem Wohnraum deutlich höher als das bestehende Angebot (Manet, 2017; Reuter, 2017). Für die finanziell benachteiligten Haushalte stellen die Wohnkosten von ungefähr 40% des verfügbaren Budgets eine wesentliche und sehr hohe Ausgabe dar. Generell kann sogar eine Verschärfung des Armutsrisikos durch die Wohnkosten beobachtet werden (Ametepe, 2019). Die luxemburgische Bevölkerung setzt sich aus den folgenden Nationalitäten zusammen: 52,5% Luxemburger, wobei etwas mehr als eine Person von 10 eine doppelte Staatsangehörigkeit besitzt und 40,1% Nationalitäten aus den weiteren 27 EU-Mitgliedsstaaten, wobei 15,6% Portugiesen den größten Anteil darstellen (Klein & Peltier, 2019). Antworten und Herausforderungen der Sozialen Arbeit Der wahrscheinlich größte Anteil der Obdachlosenhilfe besteht europaweit aus niederschwelligen Dienstleistungen, die grundlegende Unterstützung außerhalb des Wohnungswesens bieten oder aus der Bereitstellung von Notfallunterkunft/vorübergehender Unterbringung. Im Gegensatz dazu sind Dienste, die obdachlosen Menschen sofort ein dauerhaftes Zuhause bieten, in den meisten Ländern nur bis zu einem gewissen Grad präsent (Pleace, Baptista, Benjaminsen & Busch-Geertsema, 2018). In Anlehnung an die bestehenden Vergleichsstudien des European Observatory on Homelessness sowie an die europäische Typologie für Wohnungslosigkeit ETHOS wird auch das entsprechende Handlungsfeld der Sozialen Arbeit in Luxemburg durchleuchtet. Anhand dieser Darstellung folgt eine Diskussion über die bestehenden Herausforderungen für Wissenschaft, Politik und Praxis. Diskussion und Ausblick Soziale Kohäsion wird gerne als Zielsetzung und Antwort auf die Problematiken des luxemburgischen Wohnungswesens aufgeführt. Nach Habermeier (2005) umfasst die soziale Kohäsion den Ist-Zustand des Zusammenhalts einer Gemeinschaft – von der Paarbeziehung bis zur Gesamtgesellschaft – und nicht seine Entstehung. Die soziale Kohäsion als Ziel hingegen ist ein Soll-Zustand, der mehrere Fragen aufwirft, z.B. ob soziale Kohäsion planbar ist oder sich verstärken lässt, ob sie immer ein theoretischer Idealtyp der Gesellschaft bleibt oder ob die Soziale Arbeit soziale Kohäsion unterstützen kann ohne ihre Klienten in ein Abhängigkeitsverhältnis zu setzen. Bibliographie Ametepe, F. (2019). Le logement, amplificateur des inégalités au Luxembourg. Regards, 18(8). Disponible sous : https://statistiques.public.lu/catalogue-publications/regards/2019/PDF-18-2019.pdf Habermeier, R. (2005). Soziale Kohäsion. Hitotsubashi Journal of Social Studies, 37(1), 1-17. Klein, C. & Peltier, F. (2019). 93% de la population luxembourgeoise sont des ressortissants de l’UE-28. Regards, 7(5). Disponible sous : https://statistiques.public.lu/catalogue-publications/regards/2019/PDF-07-2019.pdf Manet, B. (2017). Schlimmer als die Bewerbung für einen Job? Die Facebook-WG-colocation-à louer-Welt Luxemburgs. Forum für Politik, Gesellschaft und Kultur, 372, 31. Pleace, N., Baptista, I., Benjaminsen, L. & Busch-Geertsema, V. (2018). Homelessness Services in Europe. EOH Comparative Studies on Homelessness. Brussels: European Observatory on Homelessness. Reuter, J.-P. (2017). Wohnst du schon oder suchst du noch? Über Schwierigkeiten adäquat wohnen zu dürfen und den Versuch Lösungen zu finden. Forum für Politik, Gesellschaft und Kultur, 372, 24-26. [less ▲]

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See detailGender Diversity Practices in Talent Management: An Exploratory Study in the Space Industry in Luxembourg
Usanova, Ksenia UL

Scientific Conference (2021, April 22)

This study contributes to the conceptual and empirical understanding of how gender diversity management (GDM) is integrated into talent management (TM). Following the grounded theory, we interviewed 40 HR ... [more ▼]

This study contributes to the conceptual and empirical understanding of how gender diversity management (GDM) is integrated into talent management (TM). Following the grounded theory, we interviewed 40 HR managers and talents from the space industry in Luxembourg. We provide a nuanced picture of what attitude on the GDM in TM organizations have, what strategies and practices they conduct, and how they differ from each other. Based on these differences, we developed three types of GDM integration to TM and explained the talents’ view on this issue. This study is the first empirical investigation of GDM in TM in the space industry that integrates both: the TM executives’ and TM receivers’ views on gender equality in TM. [less ▲]

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See detailResults of the project TRANSLA
Aleksic, Gabrijela UL; Bebić-Crestany, Džoen Dominique UL

Scientific Conference (2021, April 21)

In this Conference, we presented the the results from the project TRANSLA, with the focus on the teachers. According to the results from the questionnaires that were administered before and after the ... [more ▼]

In this Conference, we presented the the results from the project TRANSLA, with the focus on the teachers. According to the results from the questionnaires that were administered before and after the professional development course in translanguaging pedagogy, there was a significant increase in teachers' positive attitudes towards multilingualism and the use of children's home languages, and a significant decrease of focus on Luxembourgish only, after the course. The focus groups before and after the course and the interviews after the course showed that there was a raise of awareness of the link between implementation of home languages and children's well-being, positive change in deficit perspective of children, and positive change in attitudes (however, for some still firm monolingual stance). Finally, the teachers shared that there was a positive change in their practice (however, for some too time-consuming). [less ▲]

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See detailStudying transnational events through web archives
Schafer, Valerie UL

Scientific Conference (2021, April 20)

This short presentation was a mid-term feedback on the collective work of WG2 that I lead within the WARCnet project. I especially underlined the research we conducted through an internal datathon we ... [more ▼]

This short presentation was a mid-term feedback on the collective work of WG2 that I lead within the WARCnet project. I especially underlined the research we conducted through an internal datathon we organised in January 2021 and which used seed lists, derived data and metadata. [less ▲]

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See detailPresenter: Peripheries at the Centre: Borderland Schooling in Interwar Europe
Venken, Machteld UL

Scientific Conference (2021, April 17)

Detailed reference viewed: 39 (0 UL)
See detailPanel Organiser: Peripheries at the Centre: Borderland Schooling in Interwar Europe
Venken, Machteld UL

Scientific Conference (2021, April 17)

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See detailThird-country National Labour Workers' Mobility to and inside Europe during the COVID-19 Pandemic
Nienaber, Birte UL; Sommarribas, Adolfo UL

Scientific Conference (2021, April 15)

This presentation analyses the situation generated by the Covid-19 pandemic crisis regarding border closures and the reintroduction of temporary border controls at the internal borders in the EU and the ... [more ▼]

This presentation analyses the situation generated by the Covid-19 pandemic crisis regarding border closures and the reintroduction of temporary border controls at the internal borders in the EU and the impact that this border closures and the pandemic had on third-country nationals living or visiting the European Union. [less ▲]

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See detailMapping citizens’ reflections and perceptions of place-based experiences in the time of COVID-19
Jones, Catherine UL

Scientific Conference (2021, April 14)

Using a Citizen Science Approach, the ZesummenMaps project explores the emergent spatial interactions of our towns, cities and rural areas that arise from the COVID-19 pandemic and social distancing and ... [more ▼]

Using a Citizen Science Approach, the ZesummenMaps project explores the emergent spatial interactions of our towns, cities and rural areas that arise from the COVID-19 pandemic and social distancing and confinement policies in Luxembourg and the Greater Region. Citizens (residents, students, cross-border workers) reflect on their personal experiences of place during the crises. They contribute thoughts and perceptions through a collaborative community-mapping interface. This provides a foundation to explore, evaluate and understand the evolving perceptions and uses of public spaces, infrastructures and physical environments. Thus, creating an evidence-base of emerging spatial interactions to inform understanding of the impact of the "bleift doheem" policy (stay at home, confinement, lockdown) related to our perceptions and uses of our towns, cities and rural areas. [less ▲]

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See detailCheminformatics and the Exposome in Health and Disease
Schymanski, Emma UL; Aurich, Dagny UL

Scientific Conference (2021, April 10)

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See detailSocial Inequality in Education: Academic Achievement of First-, Second-, and Later-Generation Immigrant Students in Luxembourg
Rivas, Salvador UL; Reichel, Yanica UL; Krämer, Charlotte UL et al

Scientific Conference (2021, April 08)

Students with immigrant backgrounds are often disadvantaged in public educational systems. In Luxembourg, about 50% of primary and secondary school students have an immigrant background, most notably from ... [more ▼]

Students with immigrant backgrounds are often disadvantaged in public educational systems. In Luxembourg, about 50% of primary and secondary school students have an immigrant background, most notably from Italy, the former Yugoslavia and Portugal. Using data from Luxembourg’s national school monitoring program, we investigate and document for the first time, existing and emerging differences in academic achievement among different immigrant generations of students. Our results indicate that student achievement in Math, German and French is differentially affected by immigrant generational status and language spoken at home. In addition, we find secondary effects of student social background. [less ▲]

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See detailDesigning and managing an online, personalised research writing course for postgraduates
Deroey, Katrien UL; Skipp, Jennifer

Scientific Conference (2021, April 08)

This paper describes and evaluates an online research article writing course at the University of Luxembourg. Participants were self-referred PhD students from different disciplines. The aim of the ten ... [more ▼]

This paper describes and evaluates an online research article writing course at the University of Luxembourg. Participants were self-referred PhD students from different disciplines. The aim of the ten-week course is to improve insight into the structural, stylistic and rhetorical features of research articles as well as the writing and publication process. It also provides tools for students to develop their own writing. We will situate our course rationale and design within the literature, then compare these to both the reality of managing and delivering the course online as well as participants’ feedback as reflected in 30 surveys. We will focus on the following results: • The practicability of including multiple pedagogical elements in an online course was challenging. We wanted to integrate both independent and collaborative work, production and reflection. However, results of the surveys and our own experience show that the multiplicity of elements was often seen as complex and difficult to manage and multiple submission deadlines problematic. • Students favoured working alone over working together and uptake of writing groups (Aitchison, 2009) was poor. Multi-disciplinary peer groups were, however, positively reviewed (cf. Hyland, 2012). • The flexibility of the online environment was seen as positive, yet many reported problems finding time to write. However, participants did see the benefit in having to write regularly. Tools of reflection did not score highly. • The personalisation of learning input scored highly in the survey, but this was time-consuming to implement. Whilst instructor-student consultations were offered to further personalise feedback, these had a low uptake (8/30). • We wanted to create a course which included guidance on the writing and publication process (Starfield & Paltridge, 2016) as well as increased genre awareness (Swales, 1990) to prepare students for publication. However, tasks on language and structure were rated more useful by more students than this content. • More participants commented on the benefit of working through their language issues in live sessions over learning how to address language issues through the corpus-tools that were integrated into the course (Charles, 2018). Through sharing this information, we hope to generate a discussion with the audience about ways to optimise online writing courses and manage some of the problems associated with online delivery. Aitchison, C. (2009). Writing groups for doctoral education. Studies in Higher Education, 34(8), 905-916. Charles, M. (2018) Corpus-assisted editing for doctoral students: More than just concordancing. Journal of English for Academic Purposes, 36, 15-26. Charles, M. (2018). Using do-it-yourself-corpora in EAP: A tailor-made resource for teachers and students. Teaching English for Specific and Academic Purposes, 6(2), 217-224. Hyland, K. (2012). Disciplinary Identities: Individuality and Community in Academic Discourse. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. Nesi, H. & Gardener, S. (2012). Genres across the disciplines: Student writing in higher education. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. Paltridge, B., & Starfield, S. (2016). Getting published in academic journals: Navigating the publication process. Ann Arbor: University of Michigan Press. Swales, J. (1990). Genre analysis: English in academic and research settings. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. [less ▲]

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See detailDesigning EMI lecturer training programmes: what and how
Deroey, Katrien UL

Scientific Conference (2021, April 08)

This workshop will provide insights into designing and delivering English Medium Instruction (EMI) lecturer training. Although universities have been slow to organize EMI lecturer support, an increasing ... [more ▼]

This workshop will provide insights into designing and delivering English Medium Instruction (EMI) lecturer training. Although universities have been slow to organize EMI lecturer support, an increasing awareness of the challenges faced by EMI lecturers and their students now appears to be boosting the demand for EMI lecturer training and support initiatives. Consequently, EAP practitioners can increasingly expect requests to design and deliver such programmes. However, the efficient design and delivery of EMI lecturing training and support is a complex challenge. First, the EMI context is very varied and initiatives should be adapted to the local cultural, educational, linguistic and institutional contexts (Herington, 2020; Martinez & Fernandes, 2020; Tuomainen, 2018). Second, most literature highlights the need for language, pedagogical and intercultural components (e.g. Fortanet Gómez, 2020). Third, we need to be sensitive to lecturers’ attitudes towards EMI and EMI training (Tsui, 2018). Fourth, there are practical considerations such as the timely provision of support (Guarda & Helm, 2017), promoting participation, facilitating learning transfer to lectures, and optimizing the support in view of what are often heterogeneous participant groups in terms of English proficiency, (EMI) lecturing experience and discipline (Ball & Lindsay, 2013). Finally, the design of these programmes typically needs to happen with very limited institutional resources, few (if any) published materials and relatively little published research on lecture discourse and EMI lecturer training. The workshop will start with an overview of published training initiatives with their reported successes and challenges (Deroey, 2021). Next, participants will work in small groups, brainstorming ideas for an EMI support programme based on a brief we have recently received at the multilingual University of Luxembourg Language Centre. Finally, these proposals will be discussed in the whole group and key ideas summarized to consolidate the insights gained. Ball, P., & Lindsay, D. (2013). Language demands and support for English-medium instruction in tertiary education. Learning from a specific context In A. Doiz, D. Lasagabaster, & J. M. Sierra (Eds.), English-medium instruction at universities: Global challenges (pp. 44-61). Bristol: Multilingual Matters. -Deroey, K. L. B. (2021). Lecturer training for English Medium Instruction: what and how? In B. D. Bond, A. & M. Evans (Ed.), Innovation, exploration and transformation. Proceedings of the 2019 BALEAP Conference. Reading: Garnet. -Fortanet Gómez, I. (2020). The dimensions of EMI in the international classroom: training teachers for the future university. In M. Del Mar Sánchez-Pérez (Ed.), Teacher training for English-medium instruction in higher education (pp. 1-20). Hershey: IGI Global. -Guarda, M., & Helm, F. (2017). A survey of lecturers’ needs and feedback on EMI training. In K. Ackerley, M. Guarda, & F. Helm (Eds.), Sharing perspectives on English-medium instruction (pp. 167-194). Bern: Peter Lang. -Herington, R. (2020). Observation as a tool to facilitate the professional development of teaching faculty involved in English as a Medium of Instruction: trainer and trainee perspectives. In M. L. Carrió-Pasto (Ed.), Internationalising Learning in Higher Education (pp. 65-82). Hershey: IGI Global. -Martinez, R., & Fernandes, K. (2020). Development of a teacher training course for English medium instruction for higher education professors in Brazil. In M. Del Mar Sánchez-Pérez (Ed.), Teacher Training for English-Medium Instruction in Higher Education (pp. 125-152). Hershey: IGI Global. -Tuomainen, S. (2018). Supporting non-native university lecturers with English-medium instruction. Journal of Applied Research in Higher Education. 10(3), 230-242. -Tsui, C. (2018). Teacher efficacy: a case study of faculty beliefs in an English-medium instruction teacher training program. Taiwan Journal of TESOL, 15(1), 101-128. [less ▲]

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See detailTransition from traditional to hybrid to online courses for pre-service elementary school teachers at the University of Luxembourg: STEAM integrated approach in the project MathEduc @ BScE
Kreis, Yves UL; Haas, Ben

Scientific Conference (2021, April 07)

During the past year, technology has started enabling new forms of teaching and learning in higher education in Luxemburg. Thus, to be able to work more closely with elementary school pre-service teachers ... [more ▼]

During the past year, technology has started enabling new forms of teaching and learning in higher education in Luxemburg. Thus, to be able to work more closely with elementary school pre-service teachers, we shifted our mathematics education course during the past years to flipped classroom approaches and worked with synchronous and asynchronous teaching on- and off-campus modes. Furthermore, due to the restrictions of the COVID-19 pandemic, we decided to shift our teaching to entirely online flipped classroom approaches together with outdoor mathematical trails with STEAM integrated assessments. This final shift to a fully online flipped classroom, with self-paced, student-centred teachings and learnings, showed strong positive effects on pre-service elementary school teachers in mathematics teaching. In this presentation, we will outline results of this transition period and describe results from different studies. [less ▲]

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See detailThe STEAM skilled child: How children can learn to apply STEAM skills to their living environment
Haas, Ben; Kreis, Yves UL; Lavicza, Zsolt

Scientific Conference (2021, April 01)

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See detailJoint Beam-Hopping Scheduling and Power Allocation in NOMA-Assisted Satellite Systems
Wang, Anyue UL; Lei, Lei UL; Lagunas, Eva UL et al

Scientific Conference (2021, March 31)

In this paper, we investigate potential synergies of non-orthogonal multiple access (NOMA) and beam hopping (BH) for multi-beam satellite systems. The coexistence of BH and NOMA provides time-power-domain ... [more ▼]

In this paper, we investigate potential synergies of non-orthogonal multiple access (NOMA) and beam hopping (BH) for multi-beam satellite systems. The coexistence of BH and NOMA provides time-power-domain flexibilities in mitigating a practical mismatch effect between offered capacity and requested traffic per beam. We formulate the joint BH scheduling and NOMA-based power allocation problem as mixed-integer nonconvex programming. We reveal the xponential-conic structure for the original problem, and reformulate the problem to the format of mixed-integer conic programming (MICP), where the optimum can be obtained by exponential-complexity algorithms. A greedy scheme is proposed to solve the problem on a timeslot-by-timeslot basis with polynomial-time complexity. Numerical results show the effectiveness of the proposed efficient suboptimal algorithm in reducing the matching error by 62.57% in average over the OMA scheme and achieving a good trade-off between computational complexity and performance compared to the optimal solution. [less ▲]

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See detailTable Ronde «Zesumme mat de Kanner duerch Corono-Zaiten»
Kirsch, Claudine UL; Engel de Abreu, Pascale UL

Scientific Conference (2021, March 30)

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See detailCan Iceland learn from Luxembourg? Understanding the host country perspective in an increasingly plural composed society
Murdock, Elke UL

Scientific Conference (2021, March 26)

Luxembourg and Iceland are very different In terms of geography, but both countries have experienced dramatic changes in terms of their population structure in recent years. With 41 immigrants per 1000 ... [more ▼]

Luxembourg and Iceland are very different In terms of geography, but both countries have experienced dramatic changes in terms of their population structure in recent years. With 41 immigrants per 1000 inhabitants, Luxembourg had the second highest number of immigrants per inhabitants in Europe in 2017 with Iceland, at 35.5, coming a close second. Since the 60s, Luxembourg’s population nearly doubled and today the foreign population percentage stands at 47.5%. Until the turn of the century, Iceland’s foreign population stood at around 2%, rising steadily over the last 20 years and today stands at 14.4% - having doubled in the last 10 years. Migration studies often focus on the immigrant perspective, but especially when numbers rise, the host country perspective is important. In Luxembourg, we conducted several studies into the attitude towards multiculturalism among the host society. The Inclusive Societies – Iceland project investigated both, the experience of immigrants to Iceland but also the attitude of the native population towards immigrants. Findings from this quantitative study covering 3630 native Icelanders (51.1% women, MAge = 50.8, SD = 15.6), spread across all regions of Iceland will be presented and parallels drawn with findings from Luxembourg. Particular focus will be placed on demographic variables, language, culture contact and citizenship influencing the attitude towards a diverse society. Understanding the attitudes towards immigrants and diversity ideologies held by the native population is important, as these will determine acculturation options open to immigrants. Implications will be discussed in light of empirical findings in Luxembourg and Iceland. [less ▲]

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See detailMapping wartime Jewish diaries and their postwar trajectories
Zaagsma, Gerben UL

Scientific Conference (2021, March 26)

If Auschwitz has become the key symbol of the Holocaust, then the fate of Anne Frank and her family has become symbolic of Jewish wartime experiences in Nazi-occupied Europe, and Anne’s diaries of Jewish ... [more ▼]

If Auschwitz has become the key symbol of the Holocaust, then the fate of Anne Frank and her family has become symbolic of Jewish wartime experiences in Nazi-occupied Europe, and Anne’s diaries of Jewish diary writing. As such they are constitutive of people’s ideas about the Holocaust and the Jewish experience during World War II. Indeed, the Anne Frank diaries are intrinsic to the development of postwar Holocaust memory. Yet we know that the case of Anne Frank was far from representative, and insofar as scholars strive to recover the full range of Jewish wartime experiences, as filtered through autobiographical texts, this situation is obviously problematic. In contrast to Anne Frank and her diary, the ‘context of textual production’ (Garbarini 2014) for any Jew writing in Eastern Europe, in the very centre of the killings, could not be more different. As a result diary writing here diferred starkly in terms of both content and intent. This is particularly true for Yiddish diaries, which reflect the experiences of the poorest Jews in Eastern Europe. This paper focuses on wartime Jewish diaries from Poland. It is based mostly upon the collection of diaries from the Jewish Historical Institute in Warsaw, 75% of which are written in Polish and around 20% in Yiddish. Importantly, the collection’s inventory indicates both the locations were the writer is known to have been, as well as those locations which are mentioned in the diary, which of course do not necessarily overlap. As a result the collection’s metadata allow us to map several things: the spatio-linguistic distribution of wartime diaries and the areas covered by them; and the spread of news, as reflected by the locations covered by the diaries’ contents. Moreover, in addition to enabling the analysis of a wealth of contextual information, the inventory also lists known translation and/or publication data for each diary. As a result, we can get a glimpse in their postwar trajectories and analyse which diaries were published, where and at what time, and in which translations. This, in turn, can tell us much about the relation between translation and Holocaust memory since, as Naomi Seidman has argued (2006), “the canon of Holocaust literature should be read as the rewriting of this historical event for new audiences”. A final step would be to embed information from the diaries’ themselves, and the actual experiences that are conveyed, into the maps, thus creating a deep map which combines more factual information about the diaries with the subjective lived experiences contained within them. The project seeks to contribute to a more balanced understanding of wartime Jewish diaries and writing during WWII in Nazi-occupied Eastern Europe, though the prism of a specific collection. The broader aim of the paper is to provide an example of the type of new spatio-temporal insights that can be gleaned from collections’ metadata, in addition to ‘traditional’ textual content analysis. The project uses Nodegoat (nodegoat.net) as a way to manage, explore and visualise the data. [less ▲]

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See detailThe role of European Migration Network in supporting European migration policymakers: Mechanisms, Tools and contemporary challenges
Sommarribas, Adolfo UL

Scientific Conference (2021, March 26)

The role of the EMN in the collection of information to provide timely, comparable information to EU and national policymakers.

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See detailMixed-methods research in STEAM outdoor trails in elementary school pre-service teacher training
Haas, Ben; Kreis, Yves UL; Lavicza, Zsolt

Scientific Conference (2021, March 25)

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See detailDie Burg in St. Vith - Eine typisch „sponheimische“ Anlage?
Uhrmacher, Martin UL

Scientific Conference (2021, March 25)

Der Vortrag geht zwei Leitfragen nach: 1) Wer kommt als Erbauer der kürzlich archäologisch nachgewiesenen Burg in St. Vith in Frage? 2) Entspricht die Burg in ihrer repräsentativen und fortifikatorischen ... [more ▼]

Der Vortrag geht zwei Leitfragen nach: 1) Wer kommt als Erbauer der kürzlich archäologisch nachgewiesenen Burg in St. Vith in Frage? 2) Entspricht die Burg in ihrer repräsentativen und fortifikatorischen Gestaltung eventuell einem „sponheimischen Burgentypus“? [less ▲]

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See detaildolfiny: Convenience wrappers for DOLFINx
Zilian, Andreas UL; Habera, Michal UL

Scientific Conference (2021, March 23)

With the increased flexibility of DOLFINx and its reduction to core functionality, the responsibility for even some basic components of computational analysis is shifted to the user. This presentation ... [more ▼]

With the increased flexibility of DOLFINx and its reduction to core functionality, the responsibility for even some basic components of computational analysis is shifted to the user. This presentation provides an overview of the open-source package dolfiny, which provides end-user API interfaces to mesh/meshtags generation and processing, expression list handling, function interpolation and projection as well as the restriction of function spaces to parts of the computational domain. This functionality is consistently considered in interfaces to PETSc/SNES as nonlinear solver and SLEPc as eigensolver backend, both allowing the operation on block and nested operators. In addition, the package provides a convenient approach to incorporate time integration into the UFL formulation of the problem, which is exemplified for the generalised alpha method. The capability of dolfiny is demonstrated in a number of examples, ranging between finite strain structural analysis, plasticity and fluid-structure interaction. [less ▲]

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See detailDie Pädagogik des Translanguaging: Möglichkeiten und Herausforderungen. Keynote.
Kirsch, Claudine UL

Scientific Conference (2021, March 20)

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See detailDie Pädagogik des Translanguaging: Möglichkeiten und Herausforderungen
Kirsch, Claudine UL

Scientific Conference (2021, March 20)

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See detail3D Modelling in online learning for pre-service elementary school teachers at the University of Luxembourg
Kreis, Yves UL; Haas, Ben; Lavicza, Zsolt

Scientific Conference (2021, March 19)

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See detailUnfolding the Science Diplomacy Toolbox: Science and Innovation Centres
Epping, Elisabeth UL

Scientific Conference (2021, March 18)

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See detailBlockchain matters – on the phenomenon of legal disembodiment in blockchain technology
Becker, Katrin UL

Scientific Conference (2021, March 15)

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See detailNegative mood increases desire to eat, but not event-related potentials, for food images in bulimia nervosa
Lutz, Annika UL; Georgii, Claudio; Blechert, Jens et al

Scientific Conference (2021, March 12)

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See detailAccess to housing and education for children in migration: challenges and good practices
Sommarribas, Adolfo UL

Scientific Conference (2021, March 10)

This presentation focus on the access to housing and education for children in migration, the challenges confronted and the good practices detected.

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See detailDigital history and the politics of digitization
Zaagsma, Gerben UL

Scientific Conference (2021, March 10)

This paper addresses the question of the politics of (cultural heritage) digitisation and its consequences for historical research. To put it simply, it discusses the question of why, where and how we can ... [more ▼]

This paper addresses the question of the politics of (cultural heritage) digitisation and its consequences for historical research. To put it simply, it discusses the question of why, where and how we can access what we can access. The online documentary record affects historical research and we need to understand how and in what ways our online evidentiary basis is constituted and might affect our research. [less ▲]

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See detailThe Western European Borderlands. Overview of Possible Case-Studies
Venken, Machteld UL

Scientific Conference (2021, March 05)

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See detailExploring the History of Digital History
Zaagsma, Gerben UL

Scientific Conference (2021, March 01)

This short paper will present the first results, and outline my new project which investigates the early trajectories of history and computing and focuses on the networks of computing historians in the ... [more ▼]

This short paper will present the first results, and outline my new project which investigates the early trajectories of history and computing and focuses on the networks of computing historians in the pre-PC and early PC period. [less ▲]

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See detailInvestigating the role of individual differences in the hypoalgesic response to a virtual reality game: An exploratory analysis
Rischer, Katharina Miriam UL; Barcatta, Katharina; Battistutta, Layla UL et al

Scientific Conference (2021, March)

Introduction: Virtual reality (VR) has been shown to be a powerful method of redirecting attention away from pain and is increasingly used in clinical settings as a therapeutic tool for pain treatment ... [more ▼]

Introduction: Virtual reality (VR) has been shown to be a powerful method of redirecting attention away from pain and is increasingly used in clinical settings as a therapeutic tool for pain treatment. Yet, little is known about the underlying factors that modulate the size of the hypoalgesic response to a VR game, such as cognitive load and inter-individual differences in self-reported pain-related cognitions, emotion regulation habits, gaming skills, and executive functions. Methods: 90 healthy participants played two versions of the VR game 'Subnautica', differing in cognitive load (low load vs. high load). In the low load condition, participants navigated along a predefined route. In the high load condition, participants additionally memorized a series of single digits presented along the route. Pain heat thresholds as well as psychophysiological measures (ECG, EDA) were recorded during a passive control condition (in VR) prior to, as well as during, the two interactive sessions. In addition, participants completed several psychological questionnaires and different executive functioning tasks prior to the VR sessions. Results: Pain thresholds were significantly higher in the two interactive VR sessions when compared to the passive control condition, whereas the cognitive load of the game had no effect on pain thresholds. Individual differences in pain-related cognitions, prepotent response inhibition abilities and the level of emotional awareness reported by female participants, but not the level of gaming skills, influenced the size of the hypoalgesic effect. Discussion: In line with a growing body of studies, we observed a robust hypoalgesic response to playing a VR game, highlighting once more the potential of VR as a tool for pain reduction. Importantly, the hypoalgesic effect was not dependent on the participants’ level of gaming skills or the cognitive load of the game, suggesting that the sensory properties of the VR game were sufficient to change the processing of pain. [less ▲]

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See detailDeliberative constitution-making in Luxembourg
Burks, Deven UL; Kies, Raphaël UL

Scientific Conference (2021, February 26)

Luxembourg is a small constitutional monarchy and parliamentary democracy. Since its 1868 ratification, the Constitution of Luxembourg has been amended 35 times, so the document resembles more and more a ... [more ▼]

Luxembourg is a small constitutional monarchy and parliamentary democracy. Since its 1868 ratification, the Constitution of Luxembourg has been amended 35 times, so the document resembles more and more a patchwork quilt of basic institutions. Yet the past twenty years have seen a consensus amongst Luxembourg’s constitutional players on the need for modernization, motivated by the desire for a more coherent constitution. Article 114 vests the Chamber of Deputies with the power to initiate and to approve constitutional amendments in a two-step process. This has several consequences for deliberation. First, it is largely restricted to political elites because formal amendment powers rest solely with the Chamber. Second, there is little to no empowered maxi-public deliberation unless the Government supports a citizen consultation. Following the 2013 parliamentary elections, the new Government planned a two-part referendum on constitutional reform in summer 2015 and in winter 2015. The first referendum was intended to seek popular input on four proposals which voters rejected by large margins, and the second referendum was later scrapped. Nevertheless, this reform process has seen some participatory and deliberative experiments. For the purposes of the present COST Action, three events are of interest. First, charged by the Chamber of Deputies, the UL’s Parliamentary Studies Research Chair at organized in May 2014 CIVILEX, a citizens’ forum modelled along the lines of a 21st century Town Meeting to discuss each of the four referendum questions. Researchers found that group discussion sometimes produced significant shifts in opinion between the pre- and post-deliberation questionnaires. Furthermore, once experts had cleared up certain misunderstandings, citizens ably discussed the referendum proposals. Despite these largely positive experiences, this deliberative experiment remained an isolated experiment and was not renewed during the campaign leading up to the June 2015 referendum. Second, given the first referendum results, the Chamber made a renewed effort in 2015 to involve citizens in the constitutional reform process, so it collected proposals via a new web portal - www.ärvirschléi.lu (Your Recommendation) – and subsequently held a public hearing with those who had initiated proposals. The process yielded some participatory and deliberative outcomes, including the elaboration of several constitutional amendments. For instance, Chamber members reached consensus on strengthening the rights of children and of animals compared to their original text. Nevertheless, the webportal was not developed as an online deliberative forum and saw limited, self-selected participation. Consequently, though this was the only concrete involvement of citizens in the constitutional reform, it was the least deliberative of the three exercises. Third, since the Government had still planned to call a second referendum to vote on the constitutional reform as a whole, the Chamber again tasked the Chair with gauging public opinion. So, in July 2016, the Chaire organized CONSTITULUX, a new citizens’ forum to discuss the entire draft constitution. Citizens i.) raised pertinent questions, ii.) identified short- and long-term concerns and iii.) suggested improvements to the draft articles. One striking output was that participants were more supportive of the proposed constitutional reform. Like CIVILEX, it generated little concrete action from the Government. Moreover, the incidental and experimental nature of these events again meant that there was little maxi-public engagement. Following the draft constitution’s abandonment in November 2019, it remains to be seen what the future holds for deliberative democracy and constitution-making in Luxembourg. [less ▲]

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See detailImportance marking in EMI lectures: A comparative study
Deroey, Katrien UL; Johnson, Jane Helen

Scientific Conference (2021, February 23)

In this presentation we focus on how lecturers mark important information in their lectures. Being able to identify important information is fundamental to the learning process (Benson, 1989, p. 437), and ... [more ▼]

In this presentation we focus on how lecturers mark important information in their lectures. Being able to identify important information is fundamental to the learning process (Benson, 1989, p. 437), and the different levels of information in a lecture may be highlighted through a careful choice of language, including explicit macro markers (Chaudron & Richards, 1986; Allison & Tauroza, 1995; Jung, 2003; Titsworth & Kiewra, 2004). Previous research has focussed particularly on importance markers in native speaking (NS) lecturer discourse (e.g. Crawford Camiciottoli 2004; Deroey & Taverniers 2011, 2012; Deroey 2012, 2014, 2015). Our study expands this research to compare the use of lexicogrammatical importance markers in both NS and non-native speaker (NNS) lectures. A specially compiled corpus of about 365,000 words of Physical Science lectures was used in our study, featuring a balanced number of words from lectures in Italy (Johnson & Picciuolo, 2020; Picciuolo & Johnson, 2020) as well as in New Zealand, the UK and Malaysia (‘Engineering Lecture Corpus’ ). A qualitative analysis was done to annotate all instances of markers evaluating the importance of lecture content. These included verb, adjective or noun phrases containing an evaluation of importance. Assessment-related expressions were also marked. 378 separate instances were identified. More delicate analysis of the importance-marking phrases was done, with distributions and variations in frequent patterns identified in both NS and NNS lectures. While Verb phrases were found to be the most frequent in both NS and NNS lectures (62%), there was variation in the type of Verb patterns according to NS and NNS, as well as in verb choice. In general, though importance markers were distributed evenly over NS (=191) and NNS (=187) lectures, NS showed more variety than NNS in the type of pattern used, with adjective, metanoun and assessment-related expressions as well as idiomatic expressions figuring more frequently than in NNS, although there were significant differences also within the NS and NNS sub-corpora themselves. Whether these findings show that NNS are more aware of the risks of misunderstanding among their international student audiences (House, 2003; Mauranen, 2006), and thus use a smaller variety of less ambiguous importance markers, or that NNS have fewer language resources to draw on in the first place, awareness-raising among EMI lecturers is vital when preparing teacher training materials, given the expansion of ELF in international academic contexts where both lecturers and students are non-native speakers. References Allison, D., & Tauroza S. (1995). The effect of discourse organisation on lecture comprehension. English for Specific Purposes 14: 157-173. Benson, M.J. (1989). The Academic Listening Task: a case study. TESOL quarterly, vol. 23(3) 421-445. Chaudron, C., & Richards J. C. (1986). The effect of discourse markers on the comprehension of lectures. Applied Linguistics, vol. 7 (2) 113-127. Crawford Camiciottoli, B. (2004). Audience-oriented relevance markers in business studies lectures. In Del Lungo Camiciotti, G. & Tognini Bonelli, E. (Eds.), Academic Discourse: New Insights into Evaluation. Peter Lang, pp. 81–98. Deroey, K. L. B. (2012). What they highlight is: the discourse functions of basic wh-clefts in lectures. Journal of English for Academic Purposes 11/2: 112–24. Deroey, K.L.B. (2014). ‘Anyway, the point I'm making is': lexicogrammatical relevance marking in lectures. In Vandelanotte L., Kristin, D. Caroline G. & Ditte K. (Eds.), Recent advances in Corpus Linguistics: Developing and exploiting corpora, Amsterdam/New York, Rodopi, 265-291. Deroey, K. L. B. (2015) Marking importance in lectures: Interactive and Textual Orientation. Applied Linguistics 2015: 36/1: 51-72. Deroey, K. L. B., & Taverniers, M. (2011). A corpus-based study of lecture functions. Moderna Sprak 105/2: 1–22. Deroey, K. L. B., & Taverniers, M. (2012). Just remember this: Lexicogrammatical relevance markers in lectures. English for Specific Purposes. 31 (4) 221-233. House, J. (2003). Misunderstanding in intercultural university encounters. In House J., Kasper G and Ross S. (Eds.), Misunderstanding in social life: discourse approaches to problematic talk, London: Longman, 22-56. Johnson, J. H., & Picciuolo, M. (2020). Interaction in spoken academic discourse in an EMI context: the use of questions. Conference proceedings of the Congress UPV 6th International Conference on Higher Education Advances (HEAd’20) Domenech, J., Merello, P., de la Poza, E. & Peña-Ortiz, R. (Eds.), Editorial Universitat Politècnica de València, pp. 211-219. Mauranen, A. (2006). Signalling and preventing misunderstanding in English as a lingua franca communication. International Journal of the Sociology of Language, 177: 123-150. Picciuolo, M., & Johnson, J. H. (2020). Contrasting EMI lecturers’ perceptions with practices at the University of Bologna. In Miller, D.R. (Ed.), Quaderni del CeSLiC. Occasional papers. Bologna: Centro di Studi Linguistico-Culturali (CeSLiC), Università di Bologna. AlmaDL, p. 23. http://amsacta.unibo.it/6399/ Titsworth, S. B., & Kiewra, K.A. (2004). Spoken organizational lecture cues and student notetaking as facilitators of student learning. Contemporary Educational Psychology 29: 447-461. [less ▲]

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See detail3D modelling for pre-service primary school teachers in mathematics education
Kreis, Yves UL; Haas, Ben

Scientific Conference (2021, February 17)

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See detailKeynote: Service Oriented Architecture Chances and Challenges
Gonzalez de Oliveira, Ricardo UL; Chirstian, Kerstan; Henkel, Achim

Scientific Conference (2021, February 11)

Service Oriented Architectures are neither new nor very complicated. Quite the opposite. With the introduction of Ethernet into vehicles service based communication became reality. Therefore, the big SOA ... [more ▼]

Service Oriented Architectures are neither new nor very complicated. Quite the opposite. With the introduction of Ethernet into vehicles service based communication became reality. Therefore, the big SOA dream of independent hardware and software deployment seems to be in reach. Not only SOME/IP faces the challenge of service discovery and situation aware communication. However, automotive industry is far from mobilizing the full potential. The presentation will give an overview about the most crucial challenges we have to tackle and provide some – hopefully – helpful approaches how to overcome them. [less ▲]

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See detailQoS-Predictable SOA on TSN: Insights from a Case-Study
Villanueva, Josetxo; Migge, Jörn; Navet, Nicolas UL

Scientific Conference (2021, February 09)

This work is about the design and configuration of service-oriented communication on top of Ethernet TSN. The first objective is to present takeaways from the design and implementation of the Renault E/E ... [more ▼]

This work is about the design and configuration of service-oriented communication on top of Ethernet TSN. The first objective is to present takeaways from the design and implementation of the Renault E/E Service-Oriented Architecture (SOA) called FACE. In particular, we discuss technological, design and configuration choices made for the SOA, such as how to segment messages (UDP with multiple events, TCP, SOME/IP TP), and the technical possibilities to shape the transmission of the packets on the Ethernet network. The second objective is to study how to ensure the Quality of Service (QoS) required by services. Indeed, services introduce specific challenges, be it only the sheer amount of traffic they generate and if there is a growing body of experiences in the use of TSN QoS mechanisms most of what has been learned so far is mostly about meeting the requirements of individual streams. Less is known for services that involve the transmission of several, possibly segmented, messages with more complex transmission patterns. We show on the FACE architecture how SOME/IP messages were mapped to TSN QoS mechanisms in a manual then automated manner so as to meet the individual requirements of the services in terms of timing, and the system’s requirements in terms of memory usage. [less ▲]

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See detailOrbit Maintenance Strategy for Earth-Moon Halo Orbits
Muralidharan, Vivek UL; Howell, Kathleen C.

Scientific Conference (2021, February)

The L1 and L2 Near Rectilinear Halo Orbits (NRHOs) are proposed long horizon trajectories for cislunar exploration missions. Due to unmodeled forces as well as orbit determination errors in this ... [more ▼]

The L1 and L2 Near Rectilinear Halo Orbits (NRHOs) are proposed long horizon trajectories for cislunar exploration missions. Due to unmodeled forces as well as orbit determination errors in this dynamically sensitive region, the spacecraft deviates from the desired path. The current investigation focuses on an extended analysis of an impulsive stationkeeping technique to maintain the spacecraft near a long horizon virtual reference orbit. The dynamics in the halo orbit region are explored to identify suitable maneuver and target locations for stationkeeping. Furthermore, phasing constraints are incorporated to maintain spacecrafts on orbit where position and velocity states are sensitive to epoch time. [less ▲]

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See detailInvestigating heuristic algorithms for minimal controller location set problem in transportation networks
Mazur, Xavier UL; Rinaldi, Marco; Viti, Francesco UL

Scientific Conference (2021, February)

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See detailSensitivity Analysis on Regularity Based Driver Advisory Systems
Laskaris, Georgios; Seredynski, Marcin; Viti, Francesco UL

Scientific Conference (2021, February)

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See detailA Markov Chain Monte Carlo Approach for Estimating Daily Activity Patterns
Scheffer, Ariane Hélène Marie UL; Bandiera, Claudia UL; Cipriani, Ernesto et al

Scientific Conference (2021, February)

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See detailWorking towards responsive science education pedagogies during a time of crisis: centering community, diversity and access
Te Heesen, Kerstin UL; Siry, Christina UL; de Albuquerque Trigo, Maiza UL et al

Scientific Conference (2021, January 30)

Children, teachers, and families internationally are navigating new terrains of remote learning and teaching during the COVID-19 crisis, and this extends to the University of Luxembourg's SciTeach Center ... [more ▼]

Children, teachers, and families internationally are navigating new terrains of remote learning and teaching during the COVID-19 crisis, and this extends to the University of Luxembourg's SciTeach Center team, a multidisciplinary group of educators and researchers dedicated to supporting primary and pre-primary science education. Luxembourg’s schools closed mid-March 2020, with rapid implementation of online/distance schooling. By mid-May, the national scenario started changing with deconfinement stages, and schools adopted blended in-person/distance structure of rotating “A” and “B” weeks of instruction, ending the year with two weeks of “back to normal”. What are we wondering about? The SciTeach team responded to changing circumstances with several initiatives to support science education within new structures. The team’s interactions in response to the pandemic and resulting outcomes are the focus of a case study utilizing ethnographic methods and discourse analysis. We are examining planning discussions and development of remote science education resources for in-service teachers, children, and caregivers, with a purpose of identifying essential steps in the process, and the resulting impacts of changes. Why is this wondering important? This wondering will elaborate an adaptation process as we transitioned to online modes of interacting, reflecting on the applicability of responsive pedagogies during crisis. This crisis has exposed issues of equity and access, in particular with the high percentage of students who do not speak the languages of instruction at home (more than half) and has given rise to questions about what structural changes will/can remain ahead. As our main goal is to support children’s engagement in science, we discuss benefits and challenges associated with these responses as they were developed not with the intent to only respond, but to offer teachers a sustainable approach to support students in engaging in science moving forward. What approaches frame our thinking? Grounded in sociocultural theoretical perspectives (Sewell, 1999), we understand the teaching-learning processes as cultural enactment, and we draw on translanguaging perspectives (García, 2009) and multimodal approaches (Kress, 2004). Our theoretical and methodological approach is grounded as bricolage (Kincheloe, 2001), and we hope to honor the diversity and complexity of engaging in research with participants. We seek to trouble the existing policy-based notions of science "proficiency" as we consider diverse ways teachers, students, and families engage in science education, with a particular focus on examining issues of equity and access during crisis. Why is our wondering important to equity, diversity and / or social justice in science education? The overarching purpose of this work is identifying the adaptation process and reflecting upon the resulting impacts of changes. Issues of access and equity are multiple, for teachers, children, and caregivers, and our wondering focuses on three questions: • How can we work towards resource-rich approaches for working with students – to build on what they know and wonder – and make openings for engaging in science inquiry? • How can we support equitable student access to science, given the range of languages and technology access? • How can we keep and nurture community during times of rapid unplanned changes, and shifting interaction structures? [less ▲]

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See detailArtificial Intelligence and Sentencing in Criminal Justice
Allegrezza, Silvia UL

Scientific Conference (2021, January 27)

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See detailUnd was ist mit den Kindern? COVID-Kids: Daten der COVID-Kids I Studie aus der Schweiz
Kirsch, Claudine UL

Scientific Conference (2021, January 18)

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See detailA Distributed Pareto-based Path Planning Algorithm for Autonomous Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (Extended Abstract)
Samir Labib, Nader UL; Danoy, Grégoire UL; Brust, Matthias R. UL et al

Scientific Conference (2021, January 07)

Autonomous Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs) are in increasing demand thanks to their applicability in a wide range of domains. However, to fully exploit such potential, UAVs should be capable of ... [more ▼]

Autonomous Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs) are in increasing demand thanks to their applicability in a wide range of domains. However, to fully exploit such potential, UAVs should be capable of intelligently planning their collision-free paths as that impacts greatly the execution quality of their applications. While being a problem well addressed in literature, most presented solutions are either computationally complex centralised approaches or ones not suitable for the multiobjective requirements of most UAV use-cases. This extended abstract introduces ongoing research on a novel distributed Pareto path planning algorithm incorporating a dynamic multi-criteria decision matrix allowing each UAV to plan its collision-free path relying on local knowledge gained via digital stigmergy. The article presents some initial simulations results of a distributed UAV Traffic Management system (UTM) on a weighted multilayer network. [less ▲]

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See detailThe real problem with Rawlsian reasonableness
Burks, Deven UL

Scientific Conference (2021, January 07)

Rawlsian “reasonableness” has been criticized as “loaded” (Stout 2004: 184), “chimerical” (Young 2005: 308) or “entirely circular” (Mulhall and Swift 2003: 483). Yet these reactions often equivocate on ... [more ▼]

Rawlsian “reasonableness” has been criticized as “loaded” (Stout 2004: 184), “chimerical” (Young 2005: 308) or “entirely circular” (Mulhall and Swift 2003: 483). Yet these reactions often equivocate on the meaning of reasonableness (Freeman 2004: 2063-5). Herein, I propose a narrow, immanent criticism whereon the two basic aspects of reasonableness – (A1) proposing and abiding by fair terms of cooperation and (A2) recognizing the “burdens of judgment” (Rawls 1996: 54-8) – may conflict: accepting (A2) may give the person reason to disagree over the need for (A1). To show this, I first restate two aspects of reasonableness as a biconditional: a person is reasonable iff (A1) and (A2) obtain. I then examine whether the five burdens give reason to doubt the requirement in (A1). I find that each burden gives at least some reason to doubt just this requirement and conclude that Rawlsian reasonableness is inconsistent and in need of reformulation. This analysis yields two striking conclusions. First, public reason becomes looser and shifts to the domain of politics where one sees what public reasons others may in fact accept (Laden 2001). Seen from a different angle, one need not accept the idea that the first basic aspect and, hence, Rawlsian reasonableness are necessary conditions of political justification under conditions of reasonable pluralism (contra Krasnoff 2014: 696-7): rejecting this aspect and reasonableness in no way means that there can be no political justification under conditions of (reasonable) pluralism. Second, when conceiving justification and discourse, Rawls may be committed, despite himself, to accepting “reasonableness pluralism”, i.e. the view that there exist distinct, possibly irreconcilable accounts of reasonableness to which one may appeal when conceiving justification and discourse. Their combination may lead to a public reason liberalism framework which is at once looser and more actionable. [less ▲]

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See detailA CutFEM Method for a spatial resolved energy metabolism model in complex cellular geometries
Farina, Sofia UL

Scientific Conference (2021, January)

Computational techniques have been widely used to tackle problems in the biological sciences. A com- promise between high quality simulations and simple but accurate models can help to understand un ... [more ▼]

Computational techniques have been widely used to tackle problems in the biological sciences. A com- promise between high quality simulations and simple but accurate models can help to understand un- known aspects of this field. In this work, we will show how the Cut Finite Element Method (CutFEM) [1] can be a powerful tool to solve a reaction diffusion PDE system that models the energy metabolism of a cell. The main difficulty to approach this problem is dealing with the morphology of the cell that can have sharp edges and evolves over time. While classical FEM requires the mesh conform to the domain boundary, CutFEM allows a non-conforming discretisation of the domain, and thus is especially suited for modeling complex and evolving cellular geometries. First, we introduce our simplified model for metabolic pathways taking place in a region small enough to consider the material property as homogeneous. The results obtained with FEM (FENICS Project [2][3]) and CutFEM suggest that the two methods are equivalent. This allows us to use CutFEM to increase the complexity of the domain, from a spherical shaped cell to an irregular astrocyte. We conclude that CutFEM is a robust method for tackling biological problems with complex geometries, opening the possibility to extend the complexity of our mathematical model including more features and to consider real cellular shapes that evolve in time in future work. [less ▲]

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See detailDynamic Resource Assignment for Heterogeneous Services in 5G Downlink Under Imperfect CSI
Korrai, Praveenkumar UL; Lagunas, Eva UL; Shree Krishna Sharma et al

Scientific Conference (2021)

This paper addresses the radio access network (RAN) resource slicing problem in the context of the joint allocation of transmit powers and time-frequency resource blocks (RBs) in the 5G system consisting ... [more ▼]

This paper addresses the radio access network (RAN) resource slicing problem in the context of the joint allocation of transmit powers and time-frequency resource blocks (RBs) in the 5G system consisting of ultra-reliable and low-latency communication (URLLC) and enhanced mobile broadband (eMBB) users. Specifically, we formulate a modulation and coding scheme (MCS) based optimization problem to maximize the sum goodput of eMBB users while satisfying URLLC and eMBB users' QoS requirements. The proposed scheme considers the impact of imperfect channel state information (CSI) and the active user's queue status for the dynamic assignment of radio resources to the heterogeneous users according to its demand. The resulting mixed-integer non-convex problem is first transformed into a tractable form by exploiting the probabilistic to non-probabilistic conversion, Big-M theory, and difference-of-convex (DC) programming. Later, the transformed problem is solved using the successive convex approximation (SCA) based iterative algorithm. Our simulation results illustrate the superiority of the proposed algorithm compared to the baseline methods in terms of eMBB rate, latency in delivering the URLLC packets, and total power consumption. [less ▲]

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See detailRelationships between quantum IND-CPA notions
Ebrahimi, Ehsan UL; Unruh, Dominique; Carstens, Tore et al

Scientific Conference (2021)

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See detailPrecoding-Aided Bandwidth Optimization for High Throughput Satellite Systems
Abdu, Tedros Salih UL; Lei, Lei UL; Kisseleff, Steven UL et al

Scientific Conference (2021)

Linear precoding boosts the spectral efficiency of the satellite system by mitigating the interference signal. Typically, all users are precoded and share the same bandwidth regardless of the user demand ... [more ▼]

Linear precoding boosts the spectral efficiency of the satellite system by mitigating the interference signal. Typically, all users are precoded and share the same bandwidth regardless of the user demand. This bandwidth utilization is not efficient since the user demand permanently varies. Hence, demand-aware bandwidth allocation with linear precoding is promising. In this paper, we exploited the synergy of linear precoding and flexible bandwidth allocation for geostationary (GEO) high throughput satellite systems. We formulate an optimization problem with the goal to satisfy the demand by taking into account that multiple precoded user groups can share the different bandwidth chunks. Hence, optimal beam groups are selected with minimum bandwidth requirement to match the per beam demand. The simulation results show that the proposed method of combining bandwidth allocation and linear precoding has better bandwidth efficiency and demand satisfaction than benchmark schemes. [less ▲]

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See detailBEGYN: Auswirkungen von Bewegung und sportlicher Aktivität bei gynäkologischen Krebspatienten auf Lebensqualität, Körperzusammensetzung und prognoserelevante Biomarker
Zemlin, Cosima; Stuhlert, Caroline; Schleicher, Julia Theresa et al

Scientific Conference (2021)

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See detailA Low-complexity Resource Optimization Technique for High Throughput Satellite
Abdu, Tedros Salih UL; Kisseleff, Steven UL; Lagunas, Eva UL et al

Scientific Conference (2021)

The high throughput satellites with flexible payloads are expected to provide a high data rate to satisfy the increasing traffic demand. Furthermore, the reconfiguration capability of flexible payloads ... [more ▼]

The high throughput satellites with flexible payloads are expected to provide a high data rate to satisfy the increasing traffic demand. Furthermore, the reconfiguration capability of flexible payloads opens the door to more advanced system optimization techniques and a better utilization of satellite resources. Consequently, we can obtain high demand satisfaction at the user side. For this, dynamically adaptive high-performance and low-complexity optimization algorithms are needed. In this paper, we propose a novel low-complexity resource optimization technique for geostationary (GEO) High Throughput Satellites. The proposed method minimizes the transmit power and the overall satellite bandwidth while satisfying the demand per beam. This optimization problem turns out to be non-convex. Hence, we convexify the problem using Dinkelbach method and Successive Convex Approximation (SCA). The simulation result shows that the proposed scheme provides better flexibility in resource allocation and requires less computational time compared to the state-of-art benchmark schemes. [less ▲]

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See detailCollaboration between home and crèches: perspectives, experiences and expectations of educators in Luxembourg
Kirsch, Claudine UL; Aleksic, Gabrijela UL

Scientific Conference (2021)

Multiliteracies in early childhood education are promoted by researchers in multilingual education (García et al., 2017) and the European Commission. One way in which educators in crèches can develop ... [more ▼]

Multiliteracies in early childhood education are promoted by researchers in multilingual education (García et al., 2017) and the European Commission. One way in which educators in crèches can develop literacies in multiple languages is through collaboration with parents. Collaboration has been shown to positively influence educators, parents, and children. Educators, for instance, become aware of children’s funds of knowledge and draw on the learners’ resources and make their teaching more linguistically and culturally inclusive (Wells Rowe & Miller, 2016). While collaboration can be highly effective, the establishment of partnerships is difficult. Successful partnerships depend on several factors, among them the professionals’ beliefs, experiences, expectations, as well as space and time (Lengyel & Salem, 2016; Reynolds et al., 2017). Collaboration has been a focus of attention in Luxembourg since the introduction of multilingual education in formal and non-formal early childhood institutions. Since 2017 teachers in schools and educators in crèches are required to develop children’s skills in Luxembourgish, familiarise them with French, and value their home languages. Partnerships with parents is one pillar of this programme. A previous study has shown that educators are beginning to develop such partnerships (Kirsch 2019). The longitudinal project Collaboration with parents and Multiliteracy in early Childhood Education (COMPARE) uses a mixed-method approach to examine the multiliteracy practices as well as partnership building between parents and educators in crèches in Luxembourg. In this paper we present the perspectives of educators on partnership building and multiliteracy. The data stem from two online questionnaires completed by educators in 2020. We examine the practitioners’ perspectives on collaboration (Betz et al. 2017), modes and types of partnerships (e.g. Thiersch, 2006), types and frequency of collaborative activities in multiple languages (e.g. Hachfeld et al., 2016), and factors influencing collaboration (e.g. Reynolds et al., 2017). The data show that the declared practices are multilingual and that parents come to the crèche to do literacy activities in languages other than the main one(s) of the crèches. However, new language hierarchies are being developed. The findings demonstrate that educators and parents are actors in shaping new policies while also pointing to some arising inequalities. [less ▲]

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Peer Reviewed
See detailAssessment of a textile portable exoskeleton for the upper limbs' flexion
Samper-Escudero, Jose Luis; Coloma Chacon, Sofia UL; Olivares Mendez, Miguel Angel UL et al

Scientific Conference (2021)

Flexible exoskeletons are lightweight robots that surround the user’s anatomy to assist or oppose motion. Their structure is made of light and flexible materials, like fabrics, so the forces created by ... [more ▼]

Flexible exoskeletons are lightweight robots that surround the user’s anatomy to assist or oppose motion. Their structure is made of light and flexible materials, like fabrics, so the forces created by the robot are directly transferred to the user’s musculoskeletal system. Exosuits are thus sensitive to the sliding of the actuation, textile perturbations and improper fitting to the user. LUXBIT is a cable-driven flexible exoskeleton that combines fabrics and sewing patterns to promote its anatomical adaption. The exoskeleton is intended for bimanual assistance of daily tasks and long-term usage. To this end, the system reduces the pressures applied to the user and the misalignment of the actuation by stacking textile patches. The patches enhance the functioning of the base garment and promote the transference of the assistance forces. Additionally, LUXBIT has a compact actuation with deformable components to prevent the user movements from being restricted. The exoskeleton is portable by using an enhanced textile backpack. This paper shows the exoskeleton’s benefits for trajectory and muscle activity during the flexion of the shoulder and the elbow. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 46 (2 UL)