References of "External report"
     in
Bookmark and Share    
See detailStudent case vignettes for the investigation of teachers' tracking decisions
Böhmer, Ines; Hörstermann, Thomas UL; Gräsel, Cornelia et al

Report (in press)

Detailed reference viewed: 112 (12 UL)
Full Text
See detailAnnual Report on Migration and Asylum 2021 – Luxembourg
Holzapfel, Nicole UL; Mellinger, Lukas UL; Sommarribas, Adolfo UL et al

Report (2022)

The Annual Report on Migration and Asylum presents the statistical trends and developments in migration, asylum and integration, changes in legislation or policies, and it traces significant national ... [more ▼]

The Annual Report on Migration and Asylum presents the statistical trends and developments in migration, asylum and integration, changes in legislation or policies, and it traces significant national debates, which occurred in Luxembourg during the year 2021. Several of the most notable changes and debates in Luxembourg during the year of 2021 were of legislative nature: The Law of 16 June 2021 amending the Immigration Law entered into force on 5 July 2021. This law changes the legislation on immigration, by lightening the administrative burden for third-country nationals, and by altering certain provisions relating to intra-corporate transferees, trainees and family reunification. The Law of 16 June 2021 amending the Asylum Law entered into force on 5 July 2021. This law modifies the remedies available to applicants for international protection (AIPs). It increases their effectiveness and guarantees maximum legal certainty in the context of transfers under the Dublin Regulation, as well as in the case of final decisions to close proceedings on an application for international protection and of decisions to withdraw international protection. Bill 7844 was introduced to Parliament on 15 June 2021 to amend the amended Law of 8 March 2017 on Luxembourgish Nationality (hereinafter Nationality Law) and entered into force on 22 August as the Law of 30 July 2021. According to the Nationality Law, a candidate (a direct line descendant of a Luxembourg ancestor) for the recovery of Luxembourgish nationality must start to (re)claim her/his Luxembourg nationality before the registrar before 31 December 2022. In 2021, three noteworthy bills were introduced to parliament with their legislative procedure still ongoing at the time of writing.On 2 September 2021, the government introduced to Parliament Bill 7877, intending to amend the amended Electoral Law of 18 February 2003, hereinafter the Electoral Law. This bill intends to support political participation of the steadily growing number of non-Luxembourgish residents and it foresees the abolishment of the 5-year residency clause on active and passive voting rights for EU- and non-EU citizens residing in Luxembourg. Further, the date of closure for the registration on the electoral list before the elections for non-Luxembourg citizens to register on the municipal electoral rolls would be reduced from 87 days to 55 days. On 26 November 2021, the Government Council approved a bill proposing to amend the Immigration Law. This bill aims to ensure a more effective management of the removal of third-country nationals illegally residing on the territory by structuring the different categories of removal measures (mesures d’éloignement) in a clear and coherent way. On 19 January 2022 this bill was introduced to Parliament as Bill 7954. Bill 7881 on the exchange of information relating to nationals of countries outside the European Union as well as the European Criminal Records Information System (ECRIS) was introduced to Parliament on 10 September 2021. This system will make it possible to search for entries in the criminal records of third-country nationals against which court decisions have been issued by the criminal courts of other EU Member States. Several developments occurred with respect to integration in 2021. As already noted in the 2020 Annual Report on Migration and Asylum of the EMN Luxembourg, the Government plans to reform the amended Law of 16 December 2008 on the reception and integration of foreigners. Initial accompanying consultations have already been solicited in 2020 and this process continued in 2021. Multiple consultations with stakeholders from civil society, social partners and the municipalities took place and, in this context, the OECD-study “Towards a successful integration process: The functioning of the integration system and its actors in the Grand Duchy of Luxembourg” was published on 25 November 2021. At the beginning of 2021, the Pact of Living Together (Pakt vum Zesummeliewen – PvZ) replaced the Communal Integration Plan (PCI) to create a more dynamic and multi-year integration process for a stronger inclusion of Luxembourg’s municipalities. Continuing education for Luxembourg residents has been made more accessible and additional courses, which are tailored to AIPs and beneficiaries of international protection (BIPs), have been included into the training portfolio of the Adult Education Service (SFA). Luxembourg has initiated the planning process of extending its current public health care system. It is foreseen to offer vulnerable population groups, who have not been covered to date, low-threshold easy access to health care. Further, Luxembourg has been reacting on the changing situation in Afghanistan since the takeover of power by the Taliban in August 2021. Luxembourg has halted decisions on applications for international protection by Afghans until sufficient reliable information will be available. Between the takeover of power through the Taliban in August until the end of 2021, 71 Afghan nationals have been granted international protection. This includes 45 Afghan nationals evacuated from Afghanistan. Luxembourg has further committed to resettle additional people. While the year 2021 continued to be marked by the COVID-19 pandemic, several important developments, such as the availability of vaccines and rapid tests, did redirect pandemic activity on to different paths than in 2020. The focus lay on testing as well as on getting everyone in Luxembourg, including AIPs and persons in a situation of irregular stay, vaccinated. Yet, Luxembourg’s only external border, that is Luxembourg’s international airport, remained closed for third-country nationals. Luxembourg’s entry regulations, which were adjusted multiple times and in a dynamic fashion in line with the evolution of the pandemic, however, created several exemptions that allowed for the entry of certain third-country nationals. As of 22 December 2021, this border closure was extended from 31 December 2021 to 31 March 2022 by means of Grand Ducal Regulation. For more information, please consult the attached report. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 45 (1 UL)
Full Text
See detailRapport annuel sur les migrations et l'asile 2021 – Luxembourg
Mellinger, Lukas UL; Holzapfel-Mantin, Nicole UL; Sommarribas, Adolfo UL et al

Report (2022)

Ce rapport décrit les tendances statistiques en matière de migration, d’asile et d’intégration, les changements législatifs ou politiques et retrace les débats nationaux importants qui ont eu lieu au ... [more ▼]

Ce rapport décrit les tendances statistiques en matière de migration, d’asile et d’intégration, les changements législatifs ou politiques et retrace les débats nationaux importants qui ont eu lieu au Luxembourg au cours de l’année 2021. Les principaux changements et débats au cours de l'année 2021 étaient de nature législative ; en particulier deux lois ont été adoptées : La loi du 16 juin 2021 modifiant la loi sur l'immigration est entrée en vigueur le 5 juillet 2021. Cette loi modifie la loi sur l'immigration, en allégeant la charge administrative pour les ressortissants de pays tiers, et en modifiant certaines dispositions relatives aux travailleurs transférés intragroupe, aux stagiaires et au regroupement familial. La loi du 16 juin 2021 modifiant la loi sur l'asile est entrée en vigueur le 5 juillet 2021. Cette loi modifie les voies de recours à disposition des demandeurs de protection internationale (DPI). Elle renforce leur efficacité et garantit une sécurité juridique maximale dans le cadre des transferts sous le règlement Dublin, des décisions définitives de clôture de la procédure relative à une demande de protection internationale et des décisions de retrait de la protection internationale. Par ailleurs, la loi du 30 juillet 2021 portant modification de la loi modifiée du 8 mars 2017 sur la nationalité luxembourgeoise (ci-après loi sur la nationalité) est entré en vigueur le 22 août 2021. Selon cette loi, un candidat (descendant en ligne directe d'un ancêtre luxembourgeois) au recouvrement de la nationalité luxembourgeoise doit signer la déclaration de recouvrement de la nationalité luxembourgeoise auprès de l'officier d'état civil avant le 31 décembre 2022. En 2021, trois projets de loi concernant divers volets des politiques d’intégration ou d’immigration ont été déposés à la Chambre des Députés ; la procédure législative de ces trois projets étant toujours en cours au moment de la rédaction du présent rapport. Le 2 septembre 2021, le gouvernement a déposé à la Chambre des Députés le projet de loi n°7877, visant à modifier la loi électorale modifiée du 18 février 2003 (ci-après la loi électorale). Le texte du projet vise à soutenir la participation politique du nombre sans cesse croissant de résidents non luxembourgeois en abolissant la condition de durée de résidence de cinq ans des citoyens de l'UE et de pays tiers habitant au Luxembourg pour pouvoir participer aux élections communales, tant au niveau de l’électorat actif que passif. Par ailleurs, la date de clôture de l'inscription des résidents de nationalité étrangère sur les listes électorales communales est ramenée de 87 jours à 55 jours avant l’échéance électorale. Le 26 novembre 2021, le Conseil de gouvernement a approuvé un projet de loi proposant de modifier la loi sur l'immigration. Ce projet de loi vise à assurer une gestion plus efficace de l'éloignement des ressortissants de pays tiers résidant illégalement sur le territoire en structurant les différentes catégories de mesures d'éloignement de manière claire et cohérente. Ce projet de loi a été déposé à la Chambre des Députés le 19 janvier 2022 sous le n°7954. Le projet de loi n°7881 sur les échanges d’informations relatives aux ressortissants de pays tiers à l’Union européenne ainsi que le système européen d’information sur les casiers judiciaires (ECRIS) a été déposé à la Chambre des Députés le 10 septembre 2021. Ce système permettra de rechercher les inscriptions du casier judiciaire des ressortissants de pays tiers qui ont fait l’objet de décisions de justice de juridictions pénales d'autres États membres de l'UE. Comme déjà indiqué dans le Rapport Annuel sur les Migrations et l'Asile 2020 du EMN Luxembourg, le gouvernement prévoit de réformer la loi modifiée du 16 décembre 2008 sur l'accueil et l'intégration des étrangers (ci-après loi sur l'intégration). Les premières consultations d'acteurs sociétaux ont déjà été réalisées en 2020 et ce processus s'est poursuivi en 2021. De multiples consultations avec les acteurs de la société civile, les partenaires sociaux et les communes ont eu lieu et, dans ce contexte, l'OCDE a publié son étude intitulée « Vers un processus d'intégration réussi : Le fonctionnement du système d'intégration et ses acteurs au Grand-Duché de Luxembourg » le 25 novembre 2021. Début 2021, le « Pakt vum Zesummeliewen » (PvZ) a remplacé le Plan communal intégration (PCI) afin de créer un processus d'intégration plus dynamique et pluriannuel pour une inclusion plus forte des communes luxembourgeoises. La formation continue des résidents luxembourgeois a été rendue plus accessible et des cours supplémentaires, adaptés aux demandeurs de protection internationale (DPI) et aux bénéficiaires de protection internationale (BPI), ont été insérés dans l’offre de formation du Service de formation des adultes (SFA). Le Luxembourg a entamé le processus de planification de l'extension de son système de soins de santé public. Il est prévu d'offrir un accès aux soins de santé aux personnes vulnérables, pas couvertes jusqu'à présent. Le Luxembourg a réagi à l'évolution de la situation en Afghanistan depuis la prise du pouvoir par les Talibans en août 2021. Le Luxembourg a suspendu les décisions concernant les demandes de protection internationale des Afghans jusqu'à ce que des informations suffisantes et fiables soient disponibles. Entre la prise du pouvoir par les Talibans en août et la fin de l'année 2021, 71 ressortissants afghans ont bénéficié d'une protection internationale. Ce chiffre inclut 45 ressortissants afghans évacués d'Afghanistan. Le Luxembourg s'est en outre engagé à réinstaller d’autres personnes. Si l'année 2021 a continué à être marquée par la pandémie de COVID-19, plusieurs développements importants, tels que la disponibilité de vaccins et de tests rapides, ont réorienté l'activité de lutte contre la pandémie sur des voies différentes de celles de 2020. L'accent a été mis sur les tests et la vaccination de tous les Luxembourgeois, y compris les DPI et les personnes en situation de séjour irrégulier. Toutefois, la seule frontière extérieure du Luxembourg, à savoir l'aéroport international du Luxembourg, est restée fermée aux ressortissants de pays tiers (RPT). La réglementation luxembourgeoise en matière d'entrée sur le territoire, a été ajustée à de multiples reprises et de manière dynamique en fonction de l'évolution de la pandémie, tout en prévoyant plusieurs dérogations permettant l'entrée de certaines catégories de ressortissants de pays tiers. Le 22 décembre 2021, un règlement grand-ducal a prolongé cette fermeture de la frontière du 31 décembre 2021 au 31 mars 2022. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 40 (0 UL)
See detailEtude sur les sanctions applicables aux demandeurs de protection internationale qui commettent des manquements graves au règlement des structures d’hébergement de l’Office national de l’accueil ou présentent un comportement sérieusement violent.
Sommarribas, Adolfo UL; Osburg, Mathis UL; Nienaber, Birte UL

Report (2022)

Dans une première partie, la brochure donne les définitions de ce qui constitue « un manquement grave au règlement des centres d'accueil » et « un comportement sérieusement violent ». Ensuite est présenté ... [more ▼]

Dans une première partie, la brochure donne les définitions de ce qui constitue « un manquement grave au règlement des centres d'accueil » et « un comportement sérieusement violent ». Ensuite est présenté le cadre juridique européen et luxembourgeois ainsi que les sanctions applicables aux personnes ayant commis de tels actes. Dans une deuxième partie, la brochure décrit la gestion de ce genre de situation au Luxembourg, y compris l’ampleur et les conditions sous-jacentes du problème, la coopération interinstitutionnelle et les mesures préventives en place, ainsi que les difficultés perçues par les acteurs impliqués, avant de donner un exemple de ‘bonne pratique’ adoptée en Finlande. La brochure se termine par un aperçu des mesures possibles évoquées par les acteurs impliqués afin d’améliorer la prévention et la gestion des situations dans lesquels un DPI commet un manquement grave au règlement des centres d'accueil ou présente un comportement sérieusement violent. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 33 (2 UL)
See detailTemporary Protection in the EU - State of Play
Mellinger, Lukas UL; Sommarribas, Adolfo UL

Report (2022)

On 24 February 2022, the armed forces of the Russian Federation launched an unprovoked full-scale invasion of Ukraine. This was an unprecedented act of aggression against a sovereign and independent ... [more ▼]

On 24 February 2022, the armed forces of the Russian Federation launched an unprovoked full-scale invasion of Ukraine. This was an unprecedented act of aggression against a sovereign and independent country and goes against fundamental principles of international law. It has been strongly condemned by the international community, including the European Union. As of mid-March, over three million Ukrainian and international refugees are fleeing the war to neighbouring EU and third countries (including Moldova). This massive inflow of Ukrainian refugees into the EU resulted in the Council adopting the implementing Decision 2022/382 of 4 March 2022, introducing temporary protection as a means of dealing with the crisis. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 86 (9 UL)
Full Text
See detailAnnual Report on Migration and Asylum Part 1 2021 Luxembourg
Holzapfel, Nicole UL; Mellinger, Lukas UL; Sommarribas, Adolfo UL et al

Report (2022)

KEY POINTS 1. The Law of 16 June 2021 amending the Immigration Law changes the legislation on immigration, by lightening the administrative burden for third-country nationals, and by altering certain ... [more ▼]

KEY POINTS 1. The Law of 16 June 2021 amending the Immigration Law changes the legislation on immigration, by lightening the administrative burden for third-country nationals, and by altering certain provisions relating to intercorporate transferees, trainees and family reunification. 2. The Law of 16 June 2021 amending the Asylum Law modifies the remedies available to applicants of international protection (AIPs). This law increases their effectiveness and guarantees maximum legal certainty in the context of transfers under the Dublin Regulation, as well as in the case of final decisions to close proceedings on an application for international protection and of decisions to withdraw international protection. 3. Bill 7877, introduced to Parliament on 2 September 2021, proposes abolishing the 5-year residency clause on active and passive voting rights in municipal elections for EU- and non-EU citizens residing in Luxembourg [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 45 (8 UL)
Full Text
See detailMeasuring Poverty Persistence
Fusco, Alessio UL; van Kerm, Philippe UL

Report (2022)

This chapter reviews the literature on the measurement of poverty persistence. The review has two parts. We first cover the literature on poverty persistence indicators which develops ` principled ... [more ▼]

This chapter reviews the literature on the measurement of poverty persistence. The review has two parts. We first cover the literature on poverty persistence indicators which develops ` principled', descriptive summary measures. We then review the econometric literature which teases out the determinants of poverty persistence. Finally, we describe the challenges and limitations the literature on poverty persistence face. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 103 (1 UL)
Full Text
See detailDividend Policy Decisions and Ownership Concentration: Evidence from Thai Public Companies
Wolff, Christian UL

Report (2022)

In this paper we examine the relationship between ownership concentration and dividend policy for Thai publicly listed companies. High family ownership firms have higher dividend payouts than low family ... [more ▼]

In this paper we examine the relationship between ownership concentration and dividend policy for Thai publicly listed companies. High family ownership firms have higher dividend payouts than low family ownership firms, which we interpret to mean high family ownership firms follow a more rational dividend policy. This finding is consistent with the prediction that agency conflicts between the managers and shareholders are lower at firms with a controlling shareholder. The evidence is robust through different econometric specifications, robust when the level used to determine the extent of family ownership (family control) is lowered to 10 percent of the outstanding shares, and robust to the inclusion of the ownership wedge as a proxy for the severity of agency conflicts. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 45 (0 UL)
Full Text
See detailIntegration of migrant women in Luxembourg: policies and measures
Osburg, Mathis UL; Petry, Ralph UL; Nienaber, Birte UL

Report (2021)

This study provides an overview of the current policies and measures in Luxembourg regarding the integration of third-country national migrant women. Luxembourg follows a mainstream approach regarding ... [more ▼]

This study provides an overview of the current policies and measures in Luxembourg regarding the integration of third-country national migrant women. Luxembourg follows a mainstream approach regarding integration. According to the Law of 16 December 2008 on the integration of foreigners in the Grand Duchy of Luxembourg, integration is a two-way process that includes both the foreigner and the Luxembourgish society, thereby aiming at all non-Luxembourgish nationals (EU citizens and third-country nationals alike), independent of their gender. However, both national and EU funds may finance measures to support the integration of third-country national migrant women. The number of third-country national women in Luxembourg has increased steadily over the last years, representing 8,1% of the total female population in 2020. Most first residence titles issued to third-country national women were based on family reasons. Depending on the reasons for immigration, the most common countries of origin were India, the U.S.A., and China (to pursue remunerated activities), as well as Syria, Eritrea, the Philippines (for ‘other’ reasons, which includes, among others, beneficiaries of international protection), and Brazil (for family reasons). While third-country national women in Luxembourg comprise a diverse population, occupying jobs in both high-skilled and low-skilled employment sectors, they experience several challenges. Despite higher levels of education, they are more exposed to overcrowded housing, lower household income, lower activity rates, and higher unemployment rates than Luxembourgish women. Moreover, third-country national women are less often enrolled on electoral lists for municipal elections than female EU foreigners. Finally, the issue of discrimination towards (female) residents of African descent in Luxembourg has generated debates in recent years. The study also presents three projects specifically addressing third-country national women, which have been identified as examples of good practices in the context of integration of migrant women, namely ‘Le Temps des Femmes’ by Caritas, ‘Concept d’Intégration, d’Accompagnement et d’Orientation (CIAO!)' by Femmes en Détresse, and ‘Intégration par le Sport’ by the municipality of Esch-sur-Alzette. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 57 (10 UL)
Full Text
See detailThird-country national victims of trafficking in human beings: Detection, identification and protection in Luxembourg
Petry, Ralph UL; Sommarribas, Adolfo UL; Nienaber, Birte UL

Report (2021)

This study provides an overview of the current procedures and practices regarding the detection, identification and protection of victims of trafficking in human beings from third-countries in Luxembourg ... [more ▼]

This study provides an overview of the current procedures and practices regarding the detection, identification and protection of victims of trafficking in human beings from third-countries in Luxembourg. Since 2016, Luxembourg saw a number of significant developments with regard to legislation, institutional and policy reforms, as well as debates and awareness campaigns related to the detection, identification, and protection of (presumed) third-country national victims of trafficking in human beings. These include, among others, several legislative developments strengthening procedural safeguards and the fight against certain forms of exploitation; the establishment of a National Action Plan on ‘Trafficking in Human Beings’ (including a confidential roadmap for relevant stakeholders in the field) and a National Action Plan on ‘Prostitution’ (which also relates to trafficking in human beings); an enhanced cooperation on the Benelux level; the creation of the Search for Fugitives and Victim Protection Unit of the Judicial Police (including reinforcement in 2021); the appointment of contact person for the fight against trafficking in human beings at the Directorate of Immigration and a ‘trafficking’ reference person in each of its departments; the reinforcement of the support for victims of trafficking (including the establishment of a common space (‘INFOTRAITE’) for the two approved assistance services SAVTEH and COTEH); an increase and broadening of the basic and specialised training for various stakeholders; and the organisation of information and awareness raising campaigns. At the same time, the national referral mechanism in Luxembourg has remained the same since its establishment: all stakeholders who detect a (presumed) third-country national victim of trafficking in human beings are obliged to refer cases to the Organised Crime Unit and the Search for Fugitives and Victim Protection Unit of the Judicial Police. Only the Judicial police can formally identify a victim of trafficking and notify the Directorate of Immigration of the Ministry of Foreign and European Affairs in view of issuing a reflection period of 90 days to the third-country national. Before the expiration of the reflection period, the Directorate of Immigration consults with the Police in order to determine whether a residence permit for victims of trafficking in human beings may be issued to the third-country national. For all the details, including challenges and good practices in the area of detecting, identifying, and protecting victims of trafficking in human beings in Luxembourg, have a look at the EMN Luxembourg Study. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 60 (7 UL)
Full Text
See detailChicken and Egg: Reporting from a Datathon Exploring Datasets of the COVID-19 Special Collections
Aasman, Susan; Bingham, Nicola; Brügger, Niels et al

Report (2021)

This report is the first in a short series of WARCnet papers which aim to provide feedback on an internal datathon conducted by Working Group 2 of the WARCnet project. It explores the creation of ... [more ▼]

This report is the first in a short series of WARCnet papers which aim to provide feedback on an internal datathon conducted by Working Group 2 of the WARCnet project. It explores the creation of transnational merged datasets and corpora, based on seed lists, derived data and metadata provided by several web archiving institutions. The report highlights our first explorations of specially curated COVID web archives, in order to prepare an in-depth exploration of the issues, challenges, limitations and opportunities afforded by these heterogeneous datasets. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 40 (0 UL)
Full Text
See detailMigration Internationale au Luxembourg: Système d'observation permanente des migrations OCDE
Sommarribas, Adolfo UL; Nienaber, Birte UL

Report (2021)

Le Luxembourg reste un pays attractif à l’immigration. Entre 2019 et 2020 la population luxembourgeoise a continué à augmenter principalement en raison de l’immigration nette, passant de 626.108 à 634.730 ... [more ▼]

Le Luxembourg reste un pays attractif à l’immigration. Entre 2019 et 2020 la population luxembourgeoise a continué à augmenter principalement en raison de l’immigration nette, passant de 626.108 à 634.730 habitants (+1,4%), mais d’une manière plus discrète que les années précédentes. La part luxembourgeoise représente 52,8% de la population et les ressortissants étrangers 47,2%. La pandémie a dominé la politique en matière d’immigration et asile pendant l’année 2020 et 2021. Ces politiques ont impacté tous les secteurs au Luxembourg y compris les volets de l’immigration et de l’asile. La fermeture des frontières extérieures de l’Union Européenne, la réintroduction temporaire des contrôles aux frontières internes de l’espace Schengen (décrétées par l’Allemagne, la Belgique et la France) et la perturbation du trafic aérien international ont affecté les mouvements migratoires vers et au départ du Luxembourg. La limitation des mouvements des ressortissants pays tiers (RPT) s’est compliquée suite à la déclaration de l’état de crise entre le 18 mars et le 13 mai 2020 et la fermeture des services d’immigration et asile. Néanmoins, afin d’éviter qu’ils ne tombent dans une situation irrégulière, les autorités luxembourgeoises ont étendu la durée de validité des titres et cartes de séjour et des visas de manière automatique. De même, le traitement des dossiers et la prise de décision par la Direction de l’immigration se sont poursuivis sans interruption. L’interdiction d’entrée des RPT (avec des exceptions pour certaines catégories) a été maintenue jusqu’au 30 juin 2021. Une baisse significative du nombre de titres de séjour délivrés, de demandes d'autorisation temporaire de séjour et de visas de court séjour a été constatée, ainsi qu’une diminution de presque 50% des demandes de protection internationale. Le regroupement familial est resté le principal type de titre de séjour en 2020. Les limitations de mouvements ont aussi une incidence sur les transferts sous le règlement Dublin ainsi que sur les retours vers le pays d’origine. Au cours de l’année 2020, le Luxembourg a continué à maintenir ses engagements de solidarité internationale avec la relocalisation et la réinstallation des demandeurs de protection internationale (DPI) puisque 25 personnes (dont 16 mineurs) ont été relocalisées et 14 réinstallées. La réception des DPI s’est poursuivie car l’Office national de l’accueil (ONA) n’a pas fermé ses guichets. Un défi majeur est constitué par les taux d’occupation élevés dans les structures d’hébergement de l’ONA. La crise du logement affecte particulièrement les bénéficiaires de protection internationale (BPI) qui peinent à trouver un logement en-dehors des structures d’accueil réservées en principe aux DPI. Dans ce contexte l’ONA a poursuivi ses efforts à inciter les communes à promouvoir la mise en place de structures d’hébergement pour DPI et/ou de possibilités d’hébergement pour BPI. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 77 (8 UL)
Full Text
See detailSecurity in an evolving European HPC Ecosystem
Pleiter, Dirk; Varrette, Sébastien UL; Krishnasamy, Ezhilmathi UL et al

Report (2021)

The goal of this technical report is to analyse challenges and requirements related to security in the context of an evolving European HPC ecosystem, to provide selected strategies on how to address them ... [more ▼]

The goal of this technical report is to analyse challenges and requirements related to security in the context of an evolving European HPC ecosystem, to provide selected strategies on how to address them, and to come up with a set of forward-looking recommendations. A key assumption made in this technical report is that we are in a transition period from a setup, where HPC resources are operated in a rather independent manner, to centres providing a variety of e-infrastructure services, which are not exclusively based on HPC resources and are increasingly part of federated infrastructures. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 57 (2 UL)
Full Text
See detailMeasuring progress to address statelessness in the EU and Georgia
Sommarribas, Adolfo UL

Report (2021)

Member States reported statistics from a range of sources or categories. The time period covered by the statistics, which was not specified in the information request, also varied. If a date is not ... [more ▼]

Member States reported statistics from a range of sources or categories. The time period covered by the statistics, which was not specified in the information request, also varied. If a date is not specified, it is assumed that statistics refer to the time of the answer period for the ad hoc query which was April/May 2021. Sources/categories reported include residence permit data, population register data, statutory stateless persons, persons without citizenship, unknown/undetected nationality, nationality not specified and recognised stateless persons. T [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 69 (0 UL)
Full Text
See detailTabellenband - Jugendbericht 2020
Residori, Caroline UL; Schembri, Emanuel UL; Bulut, Hamid UL et al

Report (2021)

Detailed reference viewed: 74 (23 UL)
Full Text
See detailThe absolute Gravity Network of Haiti - Status Report 2021
Francis, Olivier UL; Sauveur, Renaldo UL; Beker, Neptune et al

Report (2021)

Detailed reference viewed: 87 (18 UL)
Full Text
See detailThe impact of COVID-19 in the migration area (EMN OECD UMBRELLA INFORM)
Sommarribas, Adolfo UL; Sheridan, Anne

Report (2021)

The COVID-19 pandemic has created profound changes in all areas of migration and asylum. EU Member States and OECD countries have made many efforts to keep the pandemic under control, entailing impacts ... [more ▼]

The COVID-19 pandemic has created profound changes in all areas of migration and asylum. EU Member States and OECD countries have made many efforts to keep the pandemic under control, entailing impacts such as border closures, travel restrictions, and the need to introduce sanitary measures. Beginning with the pandemic’s impact on permits and entry conditions, the Inform reports on contingency measures to keep systems operational and to mitigate the impacts on migrants and citizens to the extent possible. For instance, the reduction of in-person immigration related services was largely replaced by electronic or postal communication to ensure continuity in processes. In EU Member States and Norway, the automatic extension of residence permits or the removal of the obligation to leave in some cases, were some of the measures taken to reduce the impact of COVID-19. Most EU Member States provided financial support for migrant workers affected by the pandemic, either due to unemployment or loss of income, and made COVID-19 related healthcare services available to all migrants. Although restrictions were imposed on the admission of migrants, continued admission was granted for jobs deemed essential to meet labour market needs, notably in areas of health, agriculture, and transport. New digital tools have been critical in providing asylum and migration services, although the Inform notes that it has also raised new challenges. In the area of asylum, for instance, providing effective and fair application and appeals processes has become more complicated by having remote interviews, and depends largely on the applicants’ ability to use and access electronic means. Both the requests for asylum and the number of returns carried out have reduced in 2020 as a result of the pandemic. The landscape also changed for international students, where in-person attendance was discouraged if not suspended altogether. Many students returned home, and in some cases, were able to continue their studies remotely, while processes to renew residence permits were moved online. The joint research shows that public authorities have acted swiftly to introduce new measures or adapt their systems to confront the migration challenges caused by the pandemic, or in some cases, to simply continue to use pre-existing on-line systems. While the long-term impacts are hard to predict, the last chapter of the inform looks towards future migration policies and how these might be shaped in the context of the digitalisation of migration management, the need for bio-secure borders, and the expansion of teleworking digital nomads. The European Asylum Support Office (EASO) and the European Border and Coast Guard Agency (FRONTEX) provided inputs to the publication. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 114 (0 UL)
Full Text
See detailDetention and alternatives to detention in international protection and return procedures in Luxembourg
Sommarribas, Adolfo UL; Petry, Ralph UL; Nienaber, Birte UL

Report (2021)

The main objective of this study of the European Migration Network is to provide objective and reliable information about the usage of detention and alternatives to detention in international protection ... [more ▼]

The main objective of this study of the European Migration Network is to provide objective and reliable information about the usage of detention and alternatives to detention in international protection and return procedures in Luxembourg. Luxembourgish legislation, namely the amended Law of 29 August 2008 on Free Movement of Persons and Immigration (Immigration Law) and the Law of 18 December 2015 on International Protection and Temporary Protection (Asylum Law), foresees three alternatives to detention: - Alternative 1: Reporting obligations, which includes the obligation to surrender a passport, travel document or identity document; - Alternative 2: Home custody (+ electronic monitoring, if necessary); - Alternative 3: Deposition of a financial guarantee of 5.000€. In principle, the assessment between detention or alternatives to detention is made at the same time as when the grounds for detention are considered, as long as the Directorate of Immigration, as the responsible authority, has all the necessary information to decide if an alternative to detention can be ordered. Furthermore, the possibility to impose an alternative to detention is in principle systemically considered, as both relevant laws foresee that the detention decision is ordered in writing by the Minister on the basis of a case-by-case assessment, where necessary and if other less coercive measures cannot be effectively applied. Grounds for detention are generally rejected in favour of an alternative to detention if the person concerned falls within the category of vulnerable groups and if person is able to proof effective guarantees of representation to prevent the risk of absconding. This latter obligation on the third-country national to revert the legal presumption that there is a risk of absconding remains the main challenge because effective guarantees of representation are not defined by law. This is particularly challenging in the context of return procedures, where this legal presumption exists in nearly all cases where a third-country national has no valid identity, travel or residence documents. In the absence of such effective guarantees of representation, the Minister in charge of Immigration and Asylum generally does not make the decision to apply an alternative to detention. Consequently, the research in the context of this study has shown that alternatives to detention are only rarely used in Luxembourg, with the important exception of home custody in the Emergency Housing Structure of Kirchberg (‘Structure d’hébergement d’urgence Kirchberg’ – SHUK). The SHUK serves as a semi-open return facility for applicants for international protection and irregularly staying third-country nationals whose fingerprints have already been registered in Eurodac by another Member State and are therefore likely to be transferred to that Member State, in accordance with the Dublin III Regulation. A placement at the SHUK corresponds to home custody. The rare use of alternatives to detention also results in the fact that there is generally not much data available in this regard, with the important exception of home custody in the SHUK, which is more widely used. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 68 (10 UL)
Full Text
See detailUni.lu HPC Annual Report 2020
Varrette, Sébastien UL

Report (2021)

2020 was a challenging year for everyone that will stay in our memory. The pandemic disrupted our economies, societies, and all our best laid-out plans. However, COVID-19 also taught us several lessons ... [more ▼]

2020 was a challenging year for everyone that will stay in our memory. The pandemic disrupted our economies, societies, and all our best laid-out plans. However, COVID-19 also taught us several lessons for the future, in particular the (real) necessity to adapt, to be nimble and to expect the unexpected while supporting cutting-edge excellence in science with the best performing and most flexible tools to unleash research potential. One thing is certain - the strategic developments for accelerated digitalisation and the role that HPC will play to ensure a smarter and more connected University will be in focus in 2021 and the years to come. 2020 was thus a very fruitful and productive year for the ULHPC team which has seen unprecedented changes and challenges. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 59 (3 UL)
Full Text
See detailOpenMP optimisation of the eXtended Discrete Element Method (XDEM)
Ojeda-May, Pedro; Eriksson, Jerry; Rousset, Alban UL et al

Report (2021)

The eXtended Discrete Element Method (XDEM) is an extension of the regular Discrete Element Method (DEM) which is a software for simulating the dynamics of granular material. XDEM extends the regular DEM ... [more ▼]

The eXtended Discrete Element Method (XDEM) is an extension of the regular Discrete Element Method (DEM) which is a software for simulating the dynamics of granular material. XDEM extends the regular DEM method by adding features where both micro and macroscopic observables can be computed simultaneously by coupling different time and length scales. In this sense XDEM belongs the category of multi-scale/multi-physics applications which can be used in realistic simulations. In this whitepaper, we detail the different optimisations done during the preparatory PRACE project to overcome known bottlenecks in the OpenMP implementation of XDEM. We analysed the Conversion, Dynamic, and the combined Dynamics-Conversion modules with Extrae/Paraver and Intel VTune profiling tools in order to find the most expensive functions. The proposed code modifications improved the performance of XDEM by ~17% for the computational expensive Dynamics-Conversion combined modules (with 48 cores, full node). Our analysis was performed in the Marenostrum 4 (MN4) PRACE infrastructure at Barcelona Supercomputing Center (BSC). [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 159 (15 UL)
Full Text
See detailSmart Retail Banking: Potentiale und Herausforderungen Künstlicher Intelligenz
Fridgen, Gilbert UL; Körner, Marc-Fabian; Rägo, Vadim et al

Report (2021)

Detailed reference viewed: 45 (1 UL)
Full Text
See detailRAPPORT ANNUEL SUR LES MIGRATIONS ET L'ASILE Luxembourg 2020
Hallack, Florence UL; Sommarribas, Adolfo UL; Rozenberga, Zane UL et al

Report (2021)

This report traces the main developments and debates related to migration and asylum in Luxembourg in 2020. Apart from the impact of the Covid-19 pandemic on migration movements and policy, three key ... [more ▼]

This report traces the main developments and debates related to migration and asylum in Luxembourg in 2020. Apart from the impact of the Covid-19 pandemic on migration movements and policy, three key changes have taken place in 2020: 1) The creation of the National Office for Reception (ONA) and the Department of Integration, which replace the Luxembourg Office for Reception and Integration (OLAI). 2) Bill n°7682 has been tabled in the Chamber of Deputies. It aims to strengthen the security of identity cards issued to European Union (EU) citizens and family members exercising their right to free movement, to simplify administrative procedures, and to amend certain provisions concerning family reunification, intra-corporate transfers (ICT) and trainees. 3) Bill No. 7681 aims to amend the procedure for appealing against a Dublin transfer decision in order to increase its effectiveness while ensuring maximum legal certainty for the applicant for international protection. It also proposes to amend the Asylum Act by introducing "extraordinary" remedies against a final decision to close a procedure and against a decision to withdraw international protection. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 77 (8 UL)
Full Text
See detailPolicy Brief – Le Capital Social : les Facilitateurs et les Obstacles à l’Intégration des Jeunes Migrants au Luxembourg
Vysotskaya, Volha UL; Oliveira, José UL; Nienaber, Birte UL

Report (2021)

The Policy Brief opposite is based on the results of the SOCAMI project, which was drawn up on the basis of secondary analysis of European and national data concerning the socio-professional integration ... [more ▼]

The Policy Brief opposite is based on the results of the SOCAMI project, which was drawn up on the basis of secondary analysis of European and national data concerning the socio-professional integration of young migrants, as well as qualitative data collected as part of this study. Indeed, twelve biographical interviews were conducted by the researchers involved in the project with young migrants who had been living in Luxembourg for more than five years. This analysis was completed by eight expert interviews with representatives of organisations working with young people and/or migrants in various fields. These different analyses made it possible, on the one hand, to develop relevant indicators to measure the acquisition of social capital by young migrants and, on the other hand, to identify the structural obstacles to the social integration of this group. Based on these results, this document makes a number of recommendations for governmental and non-governmental organisations working with young people and/or migrants. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 55 (3 UL)
See detailEnhancing Participation in Probability-Based Online Panels: Two Incentive Experiments and their Effects on Response and Panel Recruitment
Witte, Nils; Schröder, Jette; Schauer, Ines et al

Report (2021)

This article investigates how mail based online panel recruitment can be facilitated through incentives. The analysis relies on two incentive experiments and their effects on panel recruitment and the ... [more ▼]

This article investigates how mail based online panel recruitment can be facilitated through incentives. The analysis relies on two incentive experiments and their effects on panel recruitment and the intermediate participation in the recruitment survey. The experiments were implemented in the context of the German Emigration and Remigration Panel Study and encompass two samples of randomly sampled persons. Tested incentives include a conditional lottery, conditional monetary incentives, and the combination of unconditional money-in-hand with conditional monetary incentives. For an encompassing evaluation of the link between incentives and panel recruitment, the article further assesses the incentives’ implications for demographic composition and panel recruitment unit costs. Multivariate analysis indicates that low combined incentives (€5/€5) or, where unconditional disbursement is unfeasible, high conditional incentives (€20) are most effective in enhancing panel participation. In terms of demographic bias, low combined incentives (€5/€5) and €10 conditional incentives are the favored options. The budget options from the perspective of panel recruitment include the lottery and the €10 conditional incentive which break even at net sample sizes of 1,000. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 34 (0 UL)
Full Text
See detailANNUAL REPORT ON MIGRATION AND ASYLUM Luxembourg 2020
Hallack, Florence UL; Rozenberga, Zane UL; Sommarribas, Adolfo UL et al

Report (2021)

The Annual Report on Migration and Asylum provides an overview of the main developments and debates in Luxembourg in 2020. The COVID-19 pandemic strongly impacted migratory movements to and from ... [more ▼]

The Annual Report on Migration and Asylum provides an overview of the main developments and debates in Luxembourg in 2020. The COVID-19 pandemic strongly impacted migratory movements to and from Luxembourg. In 2020, there was a significant decrease in the number of residence permits, applications for temporary authorisation of stay and visas (short stay visas and D-visas), a reduction of around 50% on the number of applications for international protection and a decline in Dublin transfers and returns. Public health measures in response to the pandemic significantly impacted migration policies. For instance, Luxembourg temporarily closed its borders to third-country nationals and automatically regularized the stay of third-country nationals whose legal residence status ended during the state of crisis. Moreover, personal interviews with applicants of international protection (AIPs) and Dublin transfers were suspended. Lastly, irregular migrants were granted access to healthcare, free of charge, regardless of their social security coverage without being issued a return order or being placed in detention during the pandemic. Outside of the COVID-19 context, the following developments can be highlighted: The introduction of Bill n°7682 foresees the extension of the time limit from three to six months available to beneficiaries of international protection (BIPs) to apply for family reunification after the granting of their status, as well as the simplification of administrative procedures, concerning the elimination of the requirement to provide integral copies of travel documents for family members of the third-country national applying for family reunification. At the procedural level, Bill n°7682 aims to amend the appeal procedure against a Dublin transfer decision to increase their effectiveness while guaranteeing maximum legal security for the applicant for international protection. It proposes to amend the Asylum Law by introducing “extraordinary” remedies against a final decision to close proceedings and against a decision to withdraw international protection. The Grand Ducal Regulation of 4 November 2020 entered into force, establishing the Commission on the evaluation of the best interest of unaccompanied minors in return decisions. However, this commission continues to generate debates and criticism, especially from fundamental rights organisations, regarding its composition. In view of the high occupancy rate in the ONA’s accommodation structures, efforts to promote the construction of new accommodation structures continued in 2020. A new emergency reception facility was set up for newcomers. Strengthening the fight against trafficking in human beings was another priority of the Luxembourgish government. As a result, the composition of the Monitoring Committee on the Fight Against the Trafficking in Human Beings was implemented by Grand Ducal Regulation. Other strategic developments were implemented, such as the elaboration of a second National Action Plan on Human Trafficking and an enhanced collaboration at the Benelux and EU level. In terms of integration, several major developments should be noted: The creation of a communication service within the Department of Integration The first interministerial committee on integration open to civil society took place on 16 December 2020 The launch of a large consultation including all key actors on the future of integration policies The selection of several municipalities to take part in a pilot phase regarding a new approach to the Communal Plan on Integration (PCI) A discussion in Parliament on the issue of racism and discrimination, which resulted in the adoption of two motions and a resolution. One of the motions provided for a study on racism and ethno-racial discrimination and the resolution aims to strengthen the resources of the Centre for Equal Treatment (CET). The Minister of Education, Children and Youth is planning to set up a service specifically responsible for the integration and reception of children of foreign origin and to review the procedures for taking care of newly arrived pupils [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 157 (18 UL)
Full Text
See detailEdge Computing: An Overview of Framework and Applications
Krishnasamy, Ezhilmathi UL; Varrette, Sébastien UL; Mucciardi, Michael

Report (2020)

This report gives an overview of the Edge Computing paradigm and its applications. Indeed, with the advent of the Internet of Things (IoT) era, many electronic devices and sensors produce a vast volume of ... [more ▼]

This report gives an overview of the Edge Computing paradigm and its applications. Indeed, with the advent of the Internet of Things (IoT) era, many electronic devices and sensors produce a vast volume of data which should be processed in a timely manner and this novel computing model is nowadays seen as a pertinent answer to this open challenge. This report thus explains why Edge Computing is needed and how the edge architecture is typically structured. It further presents the technologies that help this cutting-edge model to function properly. Since Edge Computing involves a heterogeneous architecture, it requires to adapt to a few technological recommendations for optimal performance. In this context, this report reviews the latest hardware technology trends tied to Edge Computing developments and points out technical challenges implementing this innovative computing model. In particular, we analyse how High-Performance Computing and CloudComputing infrastructures can be efficiently organised to design an Edge Computing-based framework able to tackle cutting-edge issues solved by Artificial Intelligence techniques. Finally, this report presents selected real-world applications of the Edge Computing paradigm across multiple domains affecting our daily life, i.e., healthcare, smart city and grids, industry 4.0 and public safety [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 396 (13 UL)
Full Text
See detailAccurate, timely, interoperable? Data management in the asylum procedure in Luxembourg
Petry, Ralph UL; Nienaber, Birte UL

Report (2020)

The main objective of this study of the European Migration Network is to provide objective and reliable information about the data management in the asylum procedure in Luxembourg. The Luxembourgish ... [more ▼]

The main objective of this study of the European Migration Network is to provide objective and reliable information about the data management in the asylum procedure in Luxembourg. The Luxembourgish Asylum Law foresees a centralised and streamlined asylum system with one single national authority for registering, lodging and examining applications for international protection, namely the Ministry of Foreign and European Affairs, implemented by the Directorate of Immigration. The Asylum Law clearly distinguishes the phases of making, registering and lodging an application for international protection. In practice, however, the three phases generally occur on the same day or within a few working days if the claim is not directly made to the Directorate of Immigration. Furthermore, the asylum system does not differentiate between the different types of entry routes to Luxembourgish territory. As a consequence, applicants for international protection have a swift access to the asylum procedure once they express their wish to apply for international protection in Luxembourg. In addition to the tracks foreseen in the Recast Asylum Procedures Directive (2013/32/EU), Luxembourg operates a fourth track in the form of the ultra-accelerated procedure, which was introduced in 2017 as a practical acceleration of the accelerated procedure for applicants stemming from safe countries of origin from the Western Balkan countries and Georgia. The study provides an detailed overview of what data is collected from applicants of international protection, at what stage of the procedure this data is collected and by whom, as well as where and how this data is stored. Lastly, the study has shown that, despite the increase of applications since 2015 and a consistent high number of applications since then, the processing times have decreased significantly, in particular since 2017. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 62 (13 UL)
Full Text
See detailResponses to long-term irregularly staying migrants: practices and challenges in EU Member States and Norway
Sommarribas, Adolfo UL; Hallack, Florence UL; Nienaber, Birte UL

Report (2020)

This study analyses the legal and factual situation in which long-term irregular staying migrants are in Luxembourg.

Detailed reference viewed: 94 (11 UL)
Full Text
See detailMIGRATION INTERNATIONALE AU LUXEMBOURG Système d’observation permanente des migrations (OCDE)
Sommarribas, Adolfo UL; Nienaber, Birte UL

Report (2020)

Le Luxembourg reste un pays attractif en termes d’immigration ; entre 2018 et 2019, la population du Grand-Duché a augmenté de 2 %. La part de la population luxembourgeoise représente 59,1 % de cette ... [more ▼]

Le Luxembourg reste un pays attractif en termes d’immigration ; entre 2018 et 2019, la population du Grand-Duché a augmenté de 2 %. La part de la population luxembourgeoise représente 59,1 % de cette croissance contre 40,9 % de nationalités étrangères. L’immigration nette reste le principal facteur expliquant l’augmentation de la population. Le solde migratoire est largement positif pour les ressortissants de nationalité étrangère (12 142) alors qu’il est négatif pour les ressortissants luxembourgeois (-1 067). Le deuxième élément explicatif réside dans le solde naturel global positif (1 947). Si ce solde est largement positif chez les ressortissants étrangers, il est négatif chez les Luxembourgeois. Le regroupement familial reste le principal motif d’immigration pour les ressortissants de pays tiers. Ce type de migration devance l’immigration pour motifs économiques et la migration basée sur la recherche d’une protection internationale. Le nombre de personnes sollicitant une protection internationale est resté à un niveau élevé en 2019 avec 2 047 demandes, même si ce nombre constitue une diminution de 7,1 % par rapport à l’année précédente. En 2019, plusieurs évolutions majeures dans le domaine de l’immigration légale sont à noter. Parmi ces évolutions figurent notamment : l’introduction d’un visa de longue durée visant à simplifier l’entrée et le séjour des ressortissants de pays tiers sans devoir solliciter l’obtention d’un titre de séjour, ainsi que l’adoption de quatre lois tendant à clarifier le statut des ressortissants britanniques résidant au Luxembourg. La loi sur l’immigration a connu d’autres modifications importantes dans le domaine de la lutte contre la migration irrégulière et la rétention et le retour des ressortissants de pays tiers sans droit de séjour. La coopération internationale s’est poursuivie en matière de réadmission, comme le montre l’entrée en vigueur du protocole entre les États du Benelux et le gouvernement de la République de Serbie sur la mise en œuvre de l’accord conclu entre l’UE et la République de Serbie concernant la réadmission des personnes en situation de séjour irrégulier. -Ainsi, l’adoption des projets de loi portant approbation des protocoles en matière de réadmission avec l’Arménie et l’Ukraine. Un changement institutionnel significatif a eu lieu en matière de protection internationale : la loi du 4 novembre 2019 portant création de l’Office national de l’accueil (ONA) a opéré le transfert des compétences relatives à l’accueil des demandeurs de protection internationale du Ministère de la Famille, de l’Intégration et à la Grande Région vers le ministère ayant l’Immigration dans ses attributions. Avec l'entrée en vigueur de la loi au 1er janvier 2020, l'ONA s'est substitué à l'Office luxembourgeois de l'accueil et de l'intégration (OLAI) et a été rattaché au Secrétariat général du ministère des Affaires étrangères et européennes. L’intégration demeure une compétence du ministère de la Famille, de l'Intégration et à la Grande Région. Le 1er janvier 2019, la loi sur le revenu d’inclusion sociale (REVIS) est entrée en vigueur. Une des nouvelles dispositions est que tous les bénéficiaires d’une protection internationale âgés de 25 ans ou plus, de même que les membres de leur famille, peuvent bénéficier du REVIS, sans devoir remplir la condition des 5 ans de résidence au Luxembourg au cours des 20 dernières années. L’hébergement des demandeurs de protection internationale (DPI) reste un défi de taille et les taux d’occupation dans les structures d’hébergement de l’ONA continuent à se situer à des niveaux très élevés. Ceci est notamment dû au fait que la crise du logement affecte particulièrement les bénéficiaires de protection internationale (BPI) qui peinent à trouver un logement privé et à se loger en-dehors des structures d’accueil réservées en principe aux DPI. Dans ce contexte l’ONA a poursuivi ses efforts à inciter les communes à promouvoir la mise en place de structures d’hébergement pour DPI ou de possibilités d’hébergement pour BPI. Sur le plan de la lutte contre la traite des êtres humains les structures d’accueil et de consultation ont été élargies en 2019, notamment pour les hommes victimes de traite. Au niveau international, une déclaration d’intention concernant les nouvelles étapes dans leur coopération transfrontalière pour combattre la traite des êtres humains a été signé le 10 décembre 2019 par les pays du Benelux. Sur le plan des politiques d’intégration, les autorités ont continué à mettre en œuvre le Plan d’action national pluriannuel d’intégration à travers des appels à projets. Les actions visant à promouvoir l’intégration au niveau local ont également été renforcées, comme en témoignent la promotion du développement de plans communaux d’intégration et le soutien financier apporté aux communes par les pouvoirs publics. Le débat parlementaire sur le racisme a conduit à l’adoption d’une motion invitant le gouvernement à réaliser une étude sur le racisme et les discriminations au Luxembourg et d’une résolution dans laquelle la Chambre des Députés s'engage à renforcer les moyens du Centre d’Egalite de Traitement (CET). L’année 2020 a été marquée par la crise sanitaire liée à la Covid-19. La crise sanitaire et les mesures mises en place par les gouvernements, ont fortement impacté la mobilité et les migrations. Contrairement à la France, la Belgique et, surtout, l'Allemagne, le Luxembourg n'a jamais fermé ses frontières. Dans ce contexte le Ministère des Affaires étrangères et européennes a été contraint de négocier des accords avec ses homologues des pays voisins afin d’assurer la continuité du travail des frontaliers, notamment pour ceux travaillant dans le secteur de la santé. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 113 (19 UL)
Full Text
See detailPRACE Best Practice Guide 2020: Modern Processors
Saastad, Ole Widar; Kapanova, Kristina; Markov, Stoyan et al

Report (2020)

This Best Practice Guide (BPG) extends the previously developed series of BPGs by providing an update on new technologies and systems for the further support of European High Performance Computing (HPC ... [more ▼]

This Best Practice Guide (BPG) extends the previously developed series of BPGs by providing an update on new technologies and systems for the further support of European High Performance Computing (HPC) user community in achieving a remarkable performance of their large-scale applications. It covers existing systems and aims to provide support for scientists to port, build and run their applications on these systems. While some benchmarking is part of this guide, the results provided are mainly an illustration of the different systems characteristics, and should not be used as guides for the comparison of systems presented nor should be used for system procurement considerations. Procurement and benchmarking are well covered by other PRACE work packages and are out of this BPG's discussion scope. This BPG document has grown to be a hybrid of field guide and a textbook approach. The system and processor coverage provide some relevant technical information for the users who need a deeper knowledge of the system in order to fully utilise the hardware. While the field guide approach provides hints and starting points for porting and building scientific software. For this, a range of compilers, libraries, debuggers, performance analysis tools, etc. are covered. While recommendation for compilers, libraries and flags are covered we acknowledge that there is no magic bullet as all codes are different. Unfortunately there is often no way around the trial and error approach. Some in-depth documentation of the covered processors is provided. This includes some background on the inner workings of the processors considered; the number of threads each core can handle; how these threads are implemented and how these threads (instruction streams) are scheduled onto different execution units within the core. In addition, this guide describes how the vector units with different lengths (256, 512 or in the case of SVE - variable and generally unknown until execution time) are implemented. As most of HPC work up to now has been done in 64 bit floating point the emphasis is on this data type, specially for vectors. In addition to the processor executing units, memory in its many levels of hierarchy is important. The different implementations of Non-Uniform Memory Access (NUMA) are also covered in this BPG. The guide gives a description of the hardware for a selection of relevant processors currently deployed in some PRACE HPC systems. It includes ARM64(Huawei/HiSilicon and Marvell) and x86-64 (AMD and Intel). It provides information on the programming models and development environment as well as information about porting programs. Furthermore it provides sections about strategies on how to analyze and improve the performance of applications. While this guide does not provide an update on all recent processors, some of the previous BPG releases do cover other processor architectures not discussed in this guide (e.g. Power architecture) and should be considered as a staring point for work. This guide aims also to increase the user awareness on energy and power consumption of individual applications by providing some analysis on usefulness of maximum CPU frequency scaling based on the type of application considered (e.g. CPU-bound, memory-bound, etc.). [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 202 (11 UL)
Full Text
See detailLe statut de résident de longue durée dans l'UE
Petry, Ralph UL; Sommarribas, Adolfo UL

Report (2020)

Les ressortissants de pays tiers migrent vers l’Union européenne pour différentes raisons : raisons économiques, raisons familiales, pour suivre des études ou pour obtenir une protection internationale ... [more ▼]

Les ressortissants de pays tiers migrent vers l’Union européenne pour différentes raisons : raisons économiques, raisons familiales, pour suivre des études ou pour obtenir une protection internationale. Certaines de ces personnes restent sur le territoire des États membres de nombreuses années, et tissent des liens avec l’État membre concerné. C’est pourquoi l’intégration des ressortissants de pays tiers résidents de longue durée dans les États membres est considérée comme un élément clé pour promouvoir la cohésion économique et sociale au sein de l’Union européenne. L’un des premiers textes législatifs adoptés par l’UE en matière d’immigration vers l’Union européenne a été la directive 2003/109/CE du Conseil du 25 novembre 2003 relative au statut des ressortissants de pays tiers résidents de longue durée (ci-après la « directive »). Bien que la directive soit entrée en vigueur le 23 janvier 2006, sa mise en œuvre par les États membres n’a pas été uniforme. C’est la raison pour laquelle l’EMN Luxembourg a décidé, à la demande des autorités luxembourgeoises, de lancer une étude sur ce sujet par l’intermédiaire du Réseau européen des migrations. Comme il était nécessaire de procéder à une évaluation adéquate de la mise en œuvre de la directive, le comité directeur du REM a mandaté, le 21 octobre 2019, l’EMN Luxembourg de recueillir des informations via le mécanisme des questions ad-hoc du REM afin d’établir l’état des lieux de la mise en œuvre de la directive. Les informations nécessaires à l’élaboration de la présente note de synthèse ont été recueillies par le biais de quatre questions ad-hoc du REM portant sur des aspects spécifiques du statut de résident de longue durée (ci-après le « statut RLD ») dans l’UE. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 87 (2 UL)
Full Text
See detailLong-term resident status in the EU
Petry, Ralph UL; Sommarribas, Adolfo UL

Report (2020)

Third-country nationals migrate to the European Union for different reasons: economic migration, family reasons, studies, or in search of international protection. Some of these individuals stay in the ... [more ▼]

Third-country nationals migrate to the European Union for different reasons: economic migration, family reasons, studies, or in search of international protection. Some of these individuals stay in the territory of the Member States for a considerable number of years and develop attachments to the Member State. For this reason, integration of third-country nationals who are long-term residents in the Member States is considered as a key element in promoting economic and social cohesion in the European Union. One of the first pieces of EU legislation that was adopted dealing with immigration to the European Union was the Council Directive 2003/109/EC of 25 November 2003 concerning the status of third-country nationals who are long-term residents. While the Directive entered into force on 23 January 2006, the implementation of the Directive by Member States had not been uniform. This is the reason why EMN Luxembourg decided, at the request of the Luxembourgish authorities, to launch a study on this topic through the European Migration Network. As it was necessary to make a proper assessment of the implementation of the Directive, it was decided by the EMN Steering Board on 21 October 2019 that EMN Luxembourg would collect information through the EMN Ad-Hoc Query mechanism to establish the set out a state of play of the implementation of the Directive. The information for elaborating this Inform was collected through four EMN Ad-hoc queries highlighting specific elements of the long-term resident status in the EU. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 46 (1 UL)
Full Text
See detailAttracting and Protecting Seasonal Workers from third countries in the EU
Sommarribas, Adolfo UL; Rozenberga, Zane UL; Nienaber, Birte UL

Report (2020)

For almost 150 years, Luxembourg depends on two kinds of migration, qualified and non-qualified, in order to deal with the workforce needs of its economy. Compared to other EU Member States, Luxembourg is ... [more ▼]

For almost 150 years, Luxembourg depends on two kinds of migration, qualified and non-qualified, in order to deal with the workforce needs of its economy. Compared to other EU Member States, Luxembourg is a country with the largest proportion of foreigners; however, this foreign population is mainly composed of EU citizens. In Luxembourg, 296.500 residents (47,4%) of a total population of 626.100 are foreigners. 247.900 are EU citizens representing 39.6% of the total population of the country and 83,6% of the foreign population of the country. The 48.600 third-country nationals represent only 7,8% of the total population and 16.4% of the foreign population. Due to its size and geographic location, Luxembourg has an access to a very particular form of economic migration: cross-border workers. Globalisation has also played a decisive role in the development of economic migration for the Luxembourgish labour market. The financial center was obliged to become highly specialised in order to remain competitive in regards to other financial centers and to maintain its volume of business. In order to maintain its competitive advantage, Luxembourg needs highly skilled personnel, which, up until now, the country has found within the Greater Region. With regards to the labour market: the number of salaried workers on 31 December 2019 shows that Luxembourgish residents represented only 26,5%, EU citizens (other than Luxembourgish) 23,4% and third-country national residents only 4,2%. Cross-border workers from Belgium, France and Germany represented 46% of the workforce. The Luxembourgish labour market is not a national labour market but rather a labour market of the Greater Region with a trend to become an international labour market. This situation can be explained in the context of the free movement of services and the posted workers coming from other Member States to Luxembourg. The need of workforce must be placed in this particular context, taking into account the “internal reserves”, the free movement of persons from which EU citizens, who reside in the country, benefit and the large majority of cross-border workers. To this framework one must add a range of measures that were introduced by the Luxembourgish authorities in order to regulate the labour market. Some of these measures did not have labour market needs as their only objective, but were also foreseen to manage integration processes. The attitude of the successive governments was to adapt immigration to the economic needs of the country. The government policy intends to implement an economic diversification policy, focused on attracting high added value activities such as ICT, health technologies, space, logistics, industry and FinTech. In consequence and taking into consideration the specificities of Luxembourg’s labour market, third-country national seasonal workers are not a priority of the Luxembourgish government. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 100 (19 UL)
Full Text
See detailANNUAL REPORT ON MIGRATION AND ASYLUM Luxembourg 2019
Sommarribas, Adolfo UL; Hallack, Florence UL; Rozenberga, Zane UL et al

Report (2020)

The present report provides an overview of the main developments and debates in relation to migration and asylum in Luxembourg in 2019. Luxembourg remains an important country of immigration, as evidenced ... [more ▼]

The present report provides an overview of the main developments and debates in relation to migration and asylum in Luxembourg in 2019. Luxembourg remains an important country of immigration, as evidenced by the figures on net migration, which remains the main reason for the demographic growth of the Luxembourgish resident population. Net immigration of third-country nationals remains high (7 336) and exceeds that of citizens of the European Union (EU; 4 806). The number of people applying for international protection remained high in 2019 (2 047 applications) compared to the levels registered pre-‘migration crisis’ (1 091 in 2014). Family reunification remains the principal reason for third-country nationals to immigrate to Luxembourg, followed by economic reasons and international protection. Several major developments occurred in the field of legal migration. The introduction of a new long-term visa simplifies the entry and stay of third-country nationals for a period of up to one year, without having to apply for a residence permit. In order to guarantee the rights of British citizens working and residing in Luxembourg before the withdrawal of the United Kingdom (UK) from the EU (Brexit) four laws were adopted, most of them were supposed to enter into force if there was a non-deal Brexit. Other important changes related to migration result from the adoption of the law of 4 December 2019 amending the law of 29 August 2009 on the free movement of persons and immigration (hereinafter Immigration Law). This law takes into account the expert’s comments during the evaluation in 2016 of the application of Schengen. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 112 (43 UL)
Full Text
See detailHOW DO EU MEMBER STATES TREAT CASES OF MISSING UNACCOMPANIED MINORS?
Sommarribas, Adolfo UL

Report (2020)

The phenomenon of migrant children going missing has recently received increased attention from the media in several Member States and the European Parliament. The debate focusses on unaccompanied minors ... [more ▼]

The phenomenon of migrant children going missing has recently received increased attention from the media in several Member States and the European Parliament. The debate focusses on unaccompanied minors who go missing. There is concern that the disappearance of unaccompanied minors is not addressed yet in an effective manner, as reflected in several recent publications by international organisations2 and European NGOs. In response to this concern, the EMN, at the request of the European Commission, has mapped how cases of unaccompanied children going missing are being treated in the Member States, and respectively, how data on missing children is collected. NGOs have been asked to reflect on the outcomes of this mapping exercise. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 84 (6 UL)
Full Text
See detailStatelessness in the EU
Sommarribas, Adolfo UL

Report (2020)

Statelessness is a global phenomenon which is also present in the European Union. At the end of 2018, UNHCR estimated the total number of stateless persons in the European Union plus Norway at 399 283 ... [more ▼]

Statelessness is a global phenomenon which is also present in the European Union. At the end of 2018, UNHCR estimated the total number of stateless persons in the European Union plus Norway at 399 283 individuals. This includes both stateless individuals and persons of undetermined nationality. UNHCR and UNICEF also estimate that, in 2017, there were 2 100 children registered stateless in Europe, a fourfold increase since 2010. Article 1 of the 1954 Convention Relating to the Status of Stateless Persons defines a stateless person as ‘a person who is not considered as a national by any State under the operation of its law’. Statelessness is a legal anomaly, which can prevent those concerned from accessing fundamental human, civil, political, economic, social and cultural rights. As a result, such persons often live in conditions of protracted marginalisation and discrimination, facing numerous difficulties, such as the inability to receive medical assistance, enrol in educational programmes, acquire property, obtain legal employment, marry or open a bank account. Even though statelessness can occur in various contexts, its most common causes include state succession, ill-defined or discriminatory nationality laws, and arbitrary deprivation of nationality. Statelessness can also be a consequence of forced displacement and forced migration and can result when people face difficulties accessing civil registration documents, including birth certificates, necessary to acquire or confirm nationality. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 107 (6 UL)
Full Text
See detailArgumentation Label Functions - Technical Report
Cramer, Marcos; Dauphin, Jérémie UL

Report (2020)

An important approach to abstract argumentation is the labeling-based approach, in which one makes use of labelings that assign to each argument one of three labels: in, out or und. In this paper, we ... [more ▼]

An important approach to abstract argumentation is the labeling-based approach, in which one makes use of labelings that assign to each argument one of three labels: in, out or und. In this paper, we address the question, which of the twenty-seven functions from the set of labels to the set of labels can be represented by an argumentation framework. We prove that in preferred, complete and grounded semantics, eleven labeling functions can be represented in this way while sixteen labeling functions cannot be represented by any argumentation framework. We show how this analysis of labeling functions can be applied to prove an impossibility result: Argumentation frameworks extended with a certain kind of weak attack relation cannot be flattened to the standard Dung argumentation frameworks. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 54 (7 UL)
See detailGesund Altern - Ergebnisse einer Repräsentativumfrage zu Altersbildern junger Erwachsener
Blawert, Anne; Kornadt, Anna Elena UL; Schröder, Helmut et al

Report (2020)

Detailed reference viewed: 131 (2 UL)
Full Text
See detailRAPPORT ANNUEL SUR LES MIGRATIONS ET L'ASILE Luxembourg 2019
Sommarribas, Adolfo UL; Hallack, Florence UL; Rozenberga, Zane UL et al

Report (2020)

Le présent rapport trace les principaux développements et débats relatifs à la migration et à l'asile au Luxembourg en 2019. Le Luxembourg reste un pays d'immigration important, comme en témoignent les ... [more ▼]

Le présent rapport trace les principaux développements et débats relatifs à la migration et à l'asile au Luxembourg en 2019. Le Luxembourg reste un pays d'immigration important, comme en témoignent les chiffres du solde migratoire, qui reste la principale raison de la croissance démographique de la population résidente luxembourgeoise. L'immigration nette de ressortissants de pays tiers reste élevée (7 336) et dépasse celle des citoyens de l'Union européenne (UE; 4 806). Le nombre de personnes demandant une protection internationale est resté élevé en 2019 (2 047 demandes) par rapport aux niveaux enregistrés avant la «crise migratoire» (1 091 en 2014). Le regroupement familial reste la principale raison pour laquelle les ressortissants de pays tiers immigrent au Luxembourg, suivi des raisons économiques et de la protection internationale. Plusieurs développements majeurs se sont produits dans le domaine de la migration légale. L'introduction d'un nouveau visa de longue durée simplifie l'entrée et le séjour des ressortissants de pays tiers pour une période pouvant aller jusqu'à un an, sans avoir à demander un permis de séjour. Afin de garantir les droits des citoyens britanniques travaillant et résidant au Luxembourg avant le retrait du Royaume-Uni (UK) de l'UE (Brexit), quatre lois ont été adoptées, la plupart d'entre elles étant censées entrer en vigueur en cas d’un Brexit sans accord. D'autres changements importants liés à la migration résultent de l'adoption de la loi du 4 décembre 2019 modifiant la loi du 29 août 2009 sur la libre circulation des personnes et l'immigration. Cette loi prend en compte les commentaires de l'expert lors de l'évaluation en 2016 de l'application de Schengen. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 56 (3 UL)
Full Text
See detailPathways to citizenship for third-country nationals in Luxembourg
Sommarribas, Adolfo UL; Petry, Ralph UL; Nienaber, Birte UL

Report (2019)

The main objective of this study of the European Migration Network is to provide objective and reliable information about the pathways to citizenship for third-country nationals in Luxembourg, with a ... [more ▼]

The main objective of this study of the European Migration Network is to provide objective and reliable information about the pathways to citizenship for third-country nationals in Luxembourg, with a particular focus on the ordinary naturalisation procedure. The laws and regulations regarding the acquisition of nationality in Luxembourg underwent a complete overhaul in 2017, with the amended Law of 8 March 2017 on Luxembourgish nationality abrogating the Law of 23 October 2008. This new Nationality Law instituted a number of important overarching modifications and additions that are addressed throughout the study. In general, the Luxembourg Nationality Law does not differentiate between applications introduced by EU citizens or third-country nationals. Apart from obtaining Luxembourgish nationality by simple operation of law, i.e. automatically and without any action being taken by the person concerned, the Luxembourgish Nationality Law foresees three modes through which a third-country national can acquire Luxembourgish nationality by procedural means: acquisition of nationality via ordinary naturalisation, via option or via reclamation. A look at the statistics regarding the acquisition of nationality via procedural means, including all the pathways open to third-country nationals, for the period 2014 to 2018 show that the simplified option procedure (regrouping all the 10 specific cases) is the most common pathway through which third-country nationals have acquired Luxembourgish nationality, followed by the reclamation procedure and the ordinary naturalization. In this context, it is important to make a distinction between acquisitions by residents of Luxembourg and by persons that are not residing in Luxembourg. Luxembourg introduced the principle of multiple nationalities through the legislative reform of 2008, which resulted in a significant increase of acquisitions of Luxembourgish nationality, as applicants are no longer required to renounce their other nationality or nationalities. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 47 (7 UL)
Full Text
See detailRapport annuel sur les migrations et l'asile Luxembourg 2018
Sommarribas, Adolfo UL; Coda, Nicolas UL; Rozenberga, Zane UL et al

Report (2019)

Le présent rapport fait la synthèse des principaux débats et des évolutions majeures concernant les migrations et l’asile au Luxembourg en 2018. L’année 2018 a été marquée par les élections législatives ... [more ▼]

Le présent rapport fait la synthèse des principaux débats et des évolutions majeures concernant les migrations et l’asile au Luxembourg en 2018. L’année 2018 a été marquée par les élections législatives d’octobre 2018 qui ont débouché sur la reconduction de l’ancienne coalition gouvernementale. L’accord de coalition prévoit un certain nombre de mesures relatives aux politiques migratoires. Le Luxembourg reste un pays d’immigration important. Les mouvements migratoires expliquent en grande partie la croissance de la population. Les migrations pour raisons familiales et économiques demeurent à un niveau élevé. Si certaines nationalités stagnent ou reculent tandis que d’autres progressent, cela est avant tout dû à la conjonction de deux phénomènes : d’une part, le ralentissement des flux migratoires et d’autre part, la naturalisation. Le nombre de titres de séjour délivrés pour des raisons économiques a augmenté de plus de 23% par rapport à 2017, confirmant ainsi la nette tendance à la hausse observée depuis ces dernières années. Cette progression est notamment due à l’augmentation de titres de séjour accordés aux catégories « travailleur salarié », « carte bleue européenne » et « travailleur transféré intragroupe » pour experts et cadres. La loi du 1er août 2018 qui transpose la directive n° 2016/801/UE a introduit des modifications significatives dans la politique d’admission des étudiants et des chercheurs internationaux au Luxembourg. Cette loi permet aux étudiants et aux chercheurs de séjourner au Luxembourg pendant neuf mois s’ils ont terminé leurs études de master ou de doctorat et s’ils disposent de ressources suffisantes. Le Gouvernement issu des élections législatives d’octobre 2018 entend organiser l’immigration légale en tenant compte des besoins de l’économie. L’agenda politique de l’année 2018 a également été marqué par le débat autour de la signature du Luxembourg au Pacte mondial pour une migration sûre, ordonnée et régulière (PMM). Ce débat, tant au Luxembourg qu’à l’international, a suscité un certain nombre de réactions de suspicion et de rejet, en particulier dans les milieux nationalistes de certains pays européens. Toutefois, la majorité de la classe politique luxembourgeoise ainsi que le Gouvernement ont défendu le Pacte. Le nombre de personnes demandant une protection internationale est resté élevé en 2018 et demeure relativement stable par rapport aux deux années précédentes. Le taux de reconnaissance des demandes a continué à progresser. De nombreux BPI restent hébergés dans les structures d’accueil prévues pour les DPI en raison de leurs difficultés à trouver un logement sur le marché privé ou un logement social, ce qui augmente la pression exercée sur les structures d’hébergement. Cette question problématique figure parmi les priorités des autorités nationales, comme en témoigne l’accord de coalition. Les conditions d’accueil et d’hébergement ont suscité un certain nombre de débats et de réflexions au sein de la société civile. Elles ont été abordées dans la plupart des programmes des partis politiques dans le cadre des élections législatives de 2018 et occupent une place centrale dans le nouveau plan d’action national pluriannuel d’intégration 2018 (PAN), l’accueil et l’encadrement des DPI constituant l’un des deux grands domaines d’action de ce plan. Une évolution institutionnelle majeure a eu lieu à la suite des élections législatives de 2018 : il s’agit de l’extension des compétences du ministère des Affaires étrangères et européennes qui reprend le volet « Accueil des demandeurs de protection internationale », qui relevait jusque-là du ministère de la Famille et de l’Intégration. Enfin, sur le plan européen, le nouveau gouvernement confirme son engagement en faveur du Régime d’Asile Européen Commun qui tient notamment compte de la solidarité europenne. Les mineurs non accompagnés (MNA) ont été un autre sujet de préoccupation au cours de l’année 2018 comme en témoignent le projet de loi qui vise à instaurer une équipe pluridisciplinaire pour évaluer l’intérêt supérieur de l’enfant dans le contexte d’une procédure de retour, le débat largement médiatisé autour de la pratique des examens pour la détermination de l’âge des MNA DPI, ou encore l’accent particulier que le nouveau gouvernement entend donner au renforcement de la prise en charge de ces personnes. Dans le domaine de l’intégration, il convient de souligner l’établissement d’un plan d’action national pluriannuel d’intégration 2018 (ou PAN Intégration). Ce document est le résultat d’un large processus de consultation mené par les autorités avec les différentes parties prenantes impliquées dans l'accueil et l'intégration des ressortissants non luxembourgeois. Le PAN Intégration fournit un cadre général, stratégique et durable en vue de développer des programmes et outils en faveur de l’intégration de tous les non-Luxembouregois résidant sur le territoire et de la cohésion sociale entre Luxembourgeois et non-Luxembourgeois. La loi du 8 mars 2017 sur la nationalité luxembourgeoise a généré des conséquences sur le nombre d’acquisitions de nationalité et explique la stagnation, voire le léger recul de la population étrangère au Luxembourg (et en particulier de certaines nationalités) ainsi que l’augmentation du corps électoral au Grand-Duché de Luxembourg. Les deux organes consultatifs chargés de la défense des intérets des résidents étrangers au Luxembourg ont commencé à fonctionner avec, au niveau national, le Conseil national pour étrangers (CNE) et, au niveau communal, les Commissions consultatives communales d’Intégration (CCCI), renouvelées à la suite des élections communales de 2017. Le nouveau gouvernement entend valoriser ces deux organes. Il propose d’offrir le Contrat d’accueil et d’intégration (CAI) de façon décentralisée et soutenir les communes au niveau de leur travail d’intégration locale. Le système éducatif reste confronté à des défis majeurs résultant de l’hétérogénéité de la population scolaire. Le deuxième rapport national sur l’éducation a permis de mettre en évidence les inégalités du système éducatif dues aux facteurs sociaux et au contexte migratoire des élèves. Pour faire face à cette situtaion, les autorités ont développé plusieurs mesures telles que l’élargissement de l’offre scolaire internationale et européenne, le développement de classes spécifiques pour jeunes migrants, l’établissement d’un service de médiateur au maintien, à l’inclusion et à l’intégration scolaire ainsi que l’introduction du programme d’éducation plurilingue au niveau des mini-crèches. La question de la langue luxembourgeoise, en tant que facteur d’intégration, a également fait l’objet de débats tout au long de l’année. La loi du 20 juillet 2018 relative à la promotion de la langue luxembourgeoise a introduit un certain nombre de mesures visant à renforcer l’importance de la langue luxembourgeoise, à soutenir son utilisation, son étude et son apprentissage. Plusieurs organes ont été institués afin de mettre en œuvre ce plan d’action de promotion de la langue et de la culture luxembourgeoises. La question linguistique fut également omniprésente lors de la campagne électorale. La plupart des partis politiques ont souligné dans leurs programmes électoraux l’importance de la langue luxembourgeoise comme facteur d’intégration tout en mettant en évidence l’atout du multilinguisme pour le pays. Enfin, quelques évolutions sont à signaler au niveau de la politique de retour, en particulier deux propositions de modification de la loi sur l’immigration : l’une autorisant la police à pénétrer dans des locaux d’habitation afin de procéder plus facilement à l’exécution d’une décision d’éloignement en cas de retour forcé ; l’autre prévoyant un contrôle systématique par les juridictions d’une rétention prolongée au-delà de la durée de 4 mois. Le nouveau gouvernement s’engage à compléter le dispositif actuel de rétention à travers la création d’une structure spécifique de rétention pour femmes, familles et personnes vulnérables. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 154 (13 UL)
Full Text
See detailAnnual Report on Migration and Asylum - Luxembourg 2018
Sommarribas, Adolfo UL; Rozenberga, Zane UL; Coda, Nicolas UL et al

Report (2019)

This report summarises the main debates and major developments concerning migration and asylum in Luxembourg in 2018. 2018 was marked by the parliamentary elections in October 2018, which led to the ... [more ▼]

This report summarises the main debates and major developments concerning migration and asylum in Luxembourg in 2018. 2018 was marked by the parliamentary elections in October 2018, which led to the renewal of the former Government coalition. The coalition agreement provides for a number of changes related to migration policies in Luxembourg. Luxembourg remains a country with significant immigration. The population growth is largely a result of migratory movements. Family and economic migration remains at a high level. The inflow of certain nationalities is stagnating or decreasing, whileothers are progressing. This is above all the result of two phenomena: firstly, a slowdown of overall migratory flows to the country and, secondly, high rates of naturalisation. The number of residence permits issued for economic reasons increased by more than 23% year-on-year compared to 2017, continuing the clear upward trend observed in recent years. This overall increase is due in particular to the larger numbers of residence permits issued to the "salaried worker", "European Blue Card" and "intra-corporate transferee" categories. The Law of 1st August 2018 introduced significant changes in the admission policy for international students and researchers in Luxembourg. This law transposes Directive 2016/801/EU, which allows students and researchers to stay for nine months after successfully completing their master's or doctoral studies in order to find a job or start a business. The Government elected in the parliamentary elections of October 2018 intends to organise legal immigration taking into account the needs of the economy. The 2018 political agenda also saw a large debate regarding Luxembourg signing the Global Compact for Safe, Orderly and Regular Migration (GCM). This debate, both in Luxembourg and internationally, gave rise to suspicious and negative reactions, particularly in nationalist circles in some European countries. However, there was broad support for the GCM in Luxembourg with most of the political class (6 of the 7 political parties represented in the Chamber of Deputies) defending the GCM alongside the Government The number of people seeking international protection remained high but relatively stable in 2018 compared to the previous two years. The refugee recognition rate has continued to increase. Many beneficiaries of international protection (BIPs) remain in applicants for international protection (AIP) homes as they have difficulty finding housing in the private market or social housing. This in turn increases the pressure on accommodation facilities and it is one of the priorities of the national authorities, as reflected by the coalition agreement. Reception and accommodation conditions for AIPs and BIPs have sparked a number of debates and reflections within civil society. They were discussed in most political party manifestos for the 2018 parliamentary elections. It should be noted that the new multiannual National Action Plan on Integration (Integration NAP) has these as central themes, the reception and management of AIPs is one of the two main areas of action. A major institutional development is the extension, following the 2018 legislative elections, of the powers of the Ministry of Foreign and European Affairs to include the "Reception of applicants for international protection" portfolio. Previous this belonged to the Ministry for Family and Integration. Finally, at the European level the new Government confirmed its commitment to the Common European Asylum System, which emphasises European solidarity. Unaccompanied minors were another area of concern in 2018. A Bill was published, which aims to establish a multidisciplinary team to assess the best interests of the child in the context of a return procedure. In addition, there was a widely publicised debate around the practice of age assessment. The new Government has indicated that it intends to focus on unaccompanied minor AIPs, particularly in terms of improving care for these young people. In the area of integration, the Integration NAP was drafted. This document is the result of a wide consultation process with the different stakeholders involved in the reception and integration of non-Luxembourg nationals. The Integration NAP provides a general, strategic and sustainable framework to firstly develop programmes and tools to promote the integration of all non-Luxembourgers residents in the country, and secondly, to promtoe social cohesion between Luxembourgers and non-Luxembourgers. The Law of 8 March 2017 on Luxembourg nationality has had consequences for the number of individuals gaining citizenship. The impact of this law explains the stagnation, or even slight decline in the foreign population in Luxembourg and, in particular, of certain specific nationalities, as well as the increased electorate in the Grand Duchy of Luxembourg since the law was introduced. Two advisory bodies representing the interests of foreign residents in Luxembourg are in operation: at the national level, the National Council for Foreigners (CNE), and, at the municipal level, Advisory Committees on Integration (CCCI) were renewed following the 2017 municipal elections. The new Government has stated that it intends to further increase the powers of these two bodies. Moreover, it intends to decentralise its Welcome and Integration Contracts (CAI), and to support the municipalities in their local integration work. The education system continues to face major challenges resulting from the heterogeneity of the school population. The second National Report on Education noted inequalities in the educational system caused by social origin and the migratory context of pupils. In order to cope with this situation, the authorities have focused on several measures such as expansion of the number of international and European schools; the development of specific classes for young migrants; the establishment of a mediator service for support, inclusion and school integration; and the introduction of the plurilingual education programme at nursery level. Knowledge of Luxembourgish as an integration factor was another concern throughout the year. The Law of 20 July 2018 presents a number of measures to promote the Luxembourgish language. The objectives of the Luxembourgish language policy, which aim to reinforce the importance of Luxembourgish, are to support the use and study of Luxembourgish, encourage the learning of the Luxembourgish language and culture, and promote culture in the Luxembourgish language. Several bodies have been set up to implement this action plan. The language question was ubiquitous during the election campaign. Most political parties emphasised the importance of the Luxembourgish language as an integration factor in their manifestos, while highlighting the advantage of multilingualism. Finally, there are some changes to note in the return policy of Luxembourg. There were two proposals to amend the Immigration Law: one, which authorises the police to enter residential premises to enforce removal orders in the case of forced return; and a second one, which provides for systematic oversight by the courts of prolonged detention beyond the 4-month period. The new Government has stated that it is committed to improving the current detention system through the creation of a specific detention structure for women, families and vulnerable persons. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 117 (14 UL)
Full Text
See detailBest Practices for Cloud Migration and Service Level Agreement Compliances
Ibrahim, Abdallah Ali Zainelabden Abdallah UL; Varrette, Sébastien UL; Niessen, Frederic

Report (2019)

Dell Technologies is one of the oldest Information Technology (IT) companies that involved in ICT transformation. ICT transformation is the process of modifying and adjusting the companies IT systems and ... [more ▼]

Dell Technologies is one of the oldest Information Technology (IT) companies that involved in ICT transformation. ICT transformation is the process of modifying and adjusting the companies IT systems and infrastructure. IT transformation is a multi-layer interdisciplinary process which involves typically changes to network architecture, hardware, software, data protection, i.e how data is stored and accessed. The transformation of the business workload and IT systems is the process of rip and replace and Dell is now aiming at guiding their customers in this challenging process. Indeed, Dell Technologies is providing a broad range of IT solutions and services such as data storage, protection, servers and infrastructure, networking, and cloud solutions. Concerning the last type of offer, Dell is providing public, private and hybrid cloud solutions and also coupled with cloud consulting and management services. In this context, the main objective of this work is to help Dell Technologies to come up with a guidelines document for its customers detailing the standards, migration procedures and the importance of smart Information and Communications Technology (ICT) (Cloud Computing (CC)) involved in business transition towards cloud-based solutions. Of course, it is intended for this document to serve as a fair basis to evaluate the offers of multiple cloud providers, while helping to understand the provided Service Level Agreements (SLAs) and the way they are enforced and evaluated by using the International Organization for Standardization (ISO) standards’ such as ISO/IEC DIS 19086, Information Technology (IT)- CC Service Level Agreement (SLA) framework and ISO/IEC DIS 22624, IT- CC taxonomy based data handling for cloud services [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 128 (9 UL)
Full Text
See detailMigratory pathways for start-ups and innovative entrepreneurs in the EU and Norway (Country report Luxembourg)
Sommarribas, Adolfo UL; Petry, Ralph UL; Coda, Nicolas UL et al

Report (2019)

The main objective of this study of the European Migration Network is to provide objective and reliable information about migratory pathways for start-ups and innovative entrepreneurs to Luxembourg ... [more ▼]

The main objective of this study of the European Migration Network is to provide objective and reliable information about migratory pathways for start-ups and innovative entrepreneurs to Luxembourg. Fostering start-ups and innovative enterprises is a national policy priority for Luxembourg as providing support to entrepreneurship and start-ups has been on the Luxembourgish governments’ agenda since 2013. It has been a part of a more general diversification policy of existing economic structures in order to increase economic growth of the country and reduce dependence on the financial sector, which remains the dominant economic pillar. The current Governmental programme 2018–2023 encourages support to start-ups, the acceleration of the development of the start-up ecosystem in Luxembourg as well as the promotion of Luxembourg as a ‘start-up nation’ both at national and international level. What should be pointed out is that this policy is not specifically targeted at third-country start-ups and innovative entrepreneurs, but aims to attract international investment, (innovative) enterprises and researchers in general. Thus, the mainstream immigration policy established by the amended Law of 29 August 2008 on free movement of persons (hereafter referred to as ‘Immigration Law’) for ‘self-employed worker’ or ‘investor’ residence permits is applied. The conditions that need to be fulfilled in order to be issued either a ‘self-employed worker’ or ‘investor’ residence permit as well as the conditions for the renewal of the residence permits are explained in detail in Section 3.3 and in Section 5, respectively. Several of the stakeholders involved in the context of this study reported that the existing regulations are sufficient and there is no need to introduce new ones or ones that would specifically target third-country nationals. Several initiatives have implemented in order to support the development of innovation in Luxembourg. Luxinnovation, the National Agency for the promotion of Research, Development and Innovation, was established already in 1985 and currently is reinforcing Government’s economic development objectives by providing support to companies and researchers in order to foster innovation. One of these initiatives, launched by the Ministry of the Economy in 2015 and implemented by Luxinnovation, is the Fit4Start acceleration programme which is particularly aimed at innovative ICT start-ups and recently also at start-ups from the health technologies. This programme provides coaching, business development support and funding to innovative projects or young innovative start-ups from around the world. Another important policy in the context of this study is the amended Law of 17 May 2017 on the Promotion of Research, Development and Innovation which provides a national funding scheme for Young Innovative Enterprises. Under this scheme, unlisted small enterprises that are registered for a maximum of five years can apply for State aid at the Ministry of the Economy’s Research and Innovation Directorate. Furthermore, Luxinnovation also animates the Luxembourg Cluster Initiative established by the Government in 2002. The objective of this initiative is to encourage communication and exchange of knowledge between cluster members (involving both the public and private sector) as well as to encourage use of new technologies and identification of possible business opportunities. This study further presents a table of rights and incentive measures in place to attract start-up founders and particularly highlights the access to special funding and investments, the co-working spaces as well as the access to incubation/accelerator support programmes, among others. In addition to the elements presented above, this study also elaborates on the following questions: What is the process and what are the requirements for starting up a business in Luxembourg? What are the main sectors and industries in which Luxembourg aims to attract start-ups? What is the role of local and regional authorities in creating and supporting entrepreneurial ecosystems? What role can actors such as local authorities, the private sector or higher education institutions play in attracting start-ups? Are there factors/conditions in place that incentivise start-ups and innovative entrepreneurs to use specific immigration routes? Lastly, with the use of fictional scenarios, four case studies aim to provide an understanding of the possible admission options of different types of start-ups and innovative entrepreneurs. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 195 (22 UL)
See detailInvestor Schemes "Golden Passports" and "Golden Visas"
Sommarribas, Adolfo UL

Report (2019)

For the last 10 years, the EU Member States have been developing schemes to attract wealthy third-country national investors. To this end, Member States have facilitated the granting of visas or residence ... [more ▼]

For the last 10 years, the EU Member States have been developing schemes to attract wealthy third-country national investors. To this end, Member States have facilitated the granting of visas or residence permits and even implemented fast-track procedures for the acquisition of citizenship. The Commission’s report identified the following areas of concern: 1) Security: checks run on applicants are not sufficiently robust and the EU’s own centralised information systems, such as the Schengen Information System (SIS), are not being used as systematically as they should be; 2) Money laundering: enhanced checks (‘due diligence’) are necessary to ensure that rules on anti-money laundering are not circumvented; 3) Tax evasion: monitoring and reporting is necessary to make sure that individuals do not take advantage of these schemes to benefit from privileged tax rules; 4) Transparency and information: the report finds a lack of clear information on how the schemes are run, including on the number of applications received, granted or rejected and the origins of the applicants; and 5) In addition, Member States do not (routinely) exchange information on applicants for such schemes, nor do they inform each other of rejected applicants. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 181 (6 UL)
Full Text
See detailComparative overview of national protection statuses in the EU and Norway (Country report Luxembourg)
Sommarribas, Adolfo UL; Petry, Ralph UL; Nienaber, Birte UL

Report (2019)

Luxembourg has integrated in the protection system the European legal framework on protection. However, besides the international protection (refugee status and subsidiary protection status) and the ... [more ▼]

Luxembourg has integrated in the protection system the European legal framework on protection. However, besides the international protection (refugee status and subsidiary protection status) and the temporary protection statuses, the Luxembourgish legal system foresees two humanitarian statuses which are: a) residence permit for private reasons based on serious humanitarian grounds; b) the postponement of removal based on medical reasons. In regard to the latter, there are the following steps: 1) the postponement of removal can be granted and renewed for up to 24 months; 2) after 2 years, if the medical condition persists, an authorisation of stay for medical reasons may be granted and a residence permit for private reasons may be issued. However, it is important to stress at this point that the Luxembourgish authorities do not consider the two aforementioned residence permits issued according to articles 78 (3) and 131 (2) of the Immigration Law as “protection statuses” as such, but precisely as residence permits issued to the applicant. The granting of these two “protection statuses” are based on the discretionary power of the Minister in charge of Immigration and Asylum. The residence permit for private reasons based on humanitarian grounds (Status A of this report) allows for the Minister to grant an authorisation to stay in the country to an irregular migrant if s/he is in in need to stay based on humanitarian reasons of exceptional circumstances. There is not an exhaustive list of reasons on which the Minister can base his/her decision. However, there is an exhaustive analysis of the reasons advance by the applicant. Any third country national irregularly staying on the territory can apply for this residence permit. However, in the case of rejected asylum seekers, the application will be rejected if the applicant advances the same reasons that s/he advanced during the international protection procedure. On the contrary, the residence permit for medical reasons requires that, in the first stage, the applicant had received a return decision and an order to leave the territory. In order to obtain the residence permit, he/she has to obtain first a decision for a postponement of removal for medical reasons that has to be renewed for two years before the applicant can file the application for the residence permit based on medical reasons. This residence permit is not granted automatically and if the applicant does not file his/her application after expiration of the postponement of removal for medical reasons after two years, s/he will be precluded and the return decision will be executed, except if s/he proves that s/he cannot be returned for medical reasons. In this case, the entire procedure will have to start again. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 116 (16 UL)
Full Text
See detailThe EPA Alzette-Belval: A National Tool to Address Spatial Disparities at the Lorraine-Luxembourg Border
Evrard, Estelle UL

Report (2019)

Since 2012, the EPA Alzette-Belval has embedded the strategy developed by public actors from all levels to trigger development and regain strategic room for manoeuvre in the context of steady growth in ... [more ▼]

Since 2012, the EPA Alzette-Belval has embedded the strategy developed by public actors from all levels to trigger development and regain strategic room for manoeuvre in the context of steady growth in Luxembourg. The 8 municipalities under scrutiny – the association of municipality “Pays Haut Val d’Alzette”, with 28,000 inhabitants – are marked by deindustrialisation and the attractiveness of Luxembourg’s economy, which overflows its national boundaries. The vast majority of the workforce is driven to Luxembourg, and pressure on public amenities is growing. The EPA is a state-led agency with the capacity to “take back” planning responsibilities from other administrative levels to plan specific areas. This instrument is unique in the French planning system as all levels remain involved in the governance structure and as the EPA brings technical expertise and financial resources to the locality. This case study scrutinises on how the EPA can represent a leverage for greater spatial justice within and beyond the locality, in the context of growing cross-border interdependencies. What does spatial justice mean in a cross-border context? How equitable can a cross-border area be? For a couple of years, a shared awareness of the locality’s needs has reached all levels of governance from the local to the national level. The dedicated instrument, the EPA, is equipped with the regulatory and financial capacity to act. It holds also legitimacy, know-how and expertise. It is well accepted by formal stakeholders in the locality and in the broader regional and cross-border context. The EPA appears as an appropriate tool to ensure development in a coordinated manner, considerate of sustainability, and limited use of agricultural land, thus avoiding urban sprawl and scattered urbanism. Yet, the EPA is challenged to find appropriates means to 1) inform the public of its activities; 2) develop a participatory approach when using the diverging opinions as a resource for implementing its projects. Its action partly overlooks current social inequalities (as they are not part of its direct objectives), while CCPHVA and the municipalities are challenged to face them (e.g. financially). In the long run, its capacity to support the development of public services for the local population in terms of development of residential economy and public infrastructure is highly dependent on 1) CCPHVA’s and the municipalities’ effective room for manoeuvre (politically, institutionally and financially); 2) the collaboration with public stakeholders in Luxembourg when it comes to cross-border public services (i.e. transport, economic attractiveness). [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 134 (7 UL)
Full Text
See detailUsing Machine Learning to Speed Up the Design Space Exploration of Ethernet TSN networks
Navet, Nicolas UL; Mai, Tieu Long UL; Migge, Jörn

Report (2019)

In this work, we ask if Machine Learning (ML) can provide a viable alternative to conventional schedulability analysis to determine whether a real-time Ethernet network meets a set of timing constraints ... [more ▼]

In this work, we ask if Machine Learning (ML) can provide a viable alternative to conventional schedulability analysis to determine whether a real-time Ethernet network meets a set of timing constraints. Otherwise said, can an algorithm learn what makes it difficult for a system to be feasible and predict whether a configuration will be feasible without executing a schedulability analysis? In this study, we apply standard supervised and unsupervised ML techniques and compare them, in terms of their accuracy and running times, with precise and approximate schedulability analyses in Network-Calculus. We show that ML techniques are efficient at predicting the feasibility of realistic TSN networks and offer new trade-offs between accuracy and computation time especially interesting for design-space exploration algorithms. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 600 (42 UL)
Full Text
See detailSpace Law at Unispace +50: Consequences and Future Perspectives
Salmeri, Antonino UL

Report (2019)

Report of IISL Session E7.4 on the occasion of the 69th International Astronautical Congress,

Detailed reference viewed: 77 (2 UL)
Full Text
See detailOsmá výroèní konference Centra vizuální historie Malach
Bronec, Jakub UL

Report (2019)

The annual meeting, supplemented by lectures, discussion and announcement of the results of the comics competition, has traditionally taken place under the baton of curator and historian Martin Šmok and ... [more ▼]

The annual meeting, supplemented by lectures, discussion and announcement of the results of the comics competition, has traditionally taken place under the baton of curator and historian Martin Šmok and Jiří Kocián. The guests were leading experts in oral history and Jewish history - for example Michal Frankl (Masaryk Institute and Archive of the Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic), Aleš Tamchyna (Memsource Project), Jakub Mlynář (University of Friborg, Charles University), Karolína Bukovská (Faculty of Arts, University Charles) and Marcel Mahdal (Pavel Tigrid Language Grammar School in Ostrava). [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 87 (9 UL)
Full Text
See detailSpillovers to small business credit risk
Wolff, Christian UL

Report (2019)

Detailed reference viewed: 86 (6 UL)
Full Text
See detailBeneficiaries of international protection travelling to their country of origin: Challenges, Policies and Practices in the EU Member States, Norway and Switzerland
Jacobs, Sarah UL; Sommarribas, Adolfo UL; Nienaber, Birte UL

Report (2018)

The main objectives of this study of the European Migration Network are to provide objective and reliable information about beneficiaries of international protection who travel to their country of origin ... [more ▼]

The main objectives of this study of the European Migration Network are to provide objective and reliable information about beneficiaries of international protection who travel to their country of origin or come into contact with national authorities of their country of origin, and information on cases where international protection statuses were ceased leading to, for example, the status being ended, revoked or not renewed (as per Article 45 and 46 of the recast Asylum Procedures Directive) and, ultimately, the permission to stay withdrawn. For the Luxembourgish case, it is firstly important to note that beneficiaries of the refugee status and of the status of subsidiary protection are not subject to the same restrictions with regard to travel to the country of origin or contact with national authorities. While refugees are in principle not permitted to travel to the country of origin, beneficiaries of subsidiary protection are not subject to this restriction. In this context, the phenomenon of beneficiaries of the refugee status travelling to their country of origin is currently not considered a policy priority in Luxembourg. While it does occur, there are no statistics providing information on how many refugees undertake this journey or contact the national authorities, on the reasons for travel to the country of origin, nor is there any case law on the cessation of the refugee status for reasons of travel to the country of origin. Luxembourg’s authorities are not systematically informed of such events by the authorities of other Member States. Luxembourg has no external borders with the exception of the international airport of Luxembourg, from where only an extremely limited number of flights to third countries depart. Thus, it is extremely difficult to capture the extent of the phenomenon in Luxembourg. Luxembourg’s Asylum Law establishes the re-availment of the protection of the country of origin and the voluntary re-establishment in the country of origin as grounds for cessation of the refugee status. Travel to the country of origin or contact with its national authorities are not explicitly forbidden by legislation. In principle, refugees are not permitted to travel back to the country of origin. They are provided with this information on multiple occasions: for instance at the moment of the introduction of their application, as well as when they are issued the decision granting them protection. Their travel document also clearly states the restriction. There is no notification or authorisation procedure that would authorise such travel in Luxembourg. When the Directorate of Immigration has the information that a refugee travelled back to the country of origin, it will proceed to an in-depth analysis of the personal situation of the individual. Determining that this travel is proof of the voluntary re-establishment in the country of origin is however considered extremely difficult, as it is nearly impossible to ascertain the reasons for which the refugee returned. Furthermore, a short stay in the country of origin is not necessarily considered like the (permanent) establishment in the country of origin or a proof thereof. This is also due to the fact that the Luxembourgish authorities cannot contact the authorities of the country of origin and have no tools to undertake an investigation there in order to verify that the refugee has re-established him/herself. The travel and the surrounding circumstances can be taken into account if the minister decides to re-examine the validity of the status, which could potentially lead to a withdrawal. The Directorate of Immigration has never considered ceasing protection because a refugee contacted the authorities of the country of origin. Proving that this contact occurred in the first place, and next, proving that it constitutes a re-availment of the protection of the country of origin, is considered nearly impossible. In addition, it is a fact that certain administrative procedures require the production of official documents and that the substitution of these documents with affidavits are in practice not always feasible. As previously mentioned, beneficiaries of subsidiary protection are authorised to travel back to their country of origin and are permitted to contact the authorities of their country of origin. They are even encouraged to contact the national authorities in order to obtain a national passport. These actions can thus not lead to the cessation of the status of subsidiary protection. If the decision to cease the status is taken, the beneficiary is notified of this decision in writing. The decision can be appealed before the First instance Administrative Court. If the decision of the Court is negative, the individual can file an appeal before the Second instance Administrative Court. In principle, the decision to cease international protection carries a return decision. However, the individual can apply for another residence permit if s/he fulfils the conditions established in the Immigration Law. The same is true for family members who got a residence permit through family reunification with the concerned person: the family members will lose their right to stay unless they can gain access to another residence permit under the Immigration Law. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 85 (8 UL)
Full Text
See detailLabour Market Integration of Third-Country Nationals in EU Member States
Petry, Ralph UL; Sommarribas, Adolfo UL; Nienaber, Birte UL

Report (2018)

Luxembourg is characterized by a very specific demographic situation with 47,9% of its resident population being non-Luxembourgish nationals as of 1 January 2018. This particular circumstance makes ... [more ▼]

Luxembourg is characterized by a very specific demographic situation with 47,9% of its resident population being non-Luxembourgish nationals as of 1 January 2018. This particular circumstance makes Luxembourg the EU Member State with the highest share of non-citizens residing on its territory. At the same time, around 85% of the foreign population are citizens of another EU Member State, leading to the fact that third-country nationals constitute only 7,3% of the total resident population of Luxembourg, the lowest share of foreigners coming from a third-country in the European Union. Integration is defined in national legislation as a ‘two-way process by which the foreigners shows their will to participate on a long-term basis to the host society, which, in turn, takes all the necessary measures at the social, economic, political, and cultural levels, to encourage and facilitate this approach. Integration is a task that the State, municipalities and civil society achieve together’. In addition to this legal provision, several strategic documents, most notably the multi-annual national action plan on integration 2018, or PAN integration, published in July 2018, make reference to integration and its definition. The PAN integration provides the framework for the programs and tools favouring the social cohesion of Luxembourgish and non-Luxembourgish nationals and the overall national integration policy by identifying five priority domains, one of which explicitly relates to the reinforcement of employability of non-Luxembourgish nationals. Generally speaking, employment is viewed as a core element of the overall integration process, making both the access to as well as the integration into the Luxembourgish labour market a key element in becoming a part of society. At the same time, this access to and integration into the labour market pose a challenge, particularly to third-country nationals, as the statistics show that their employment rate is lower than that of Luxembourgish nationals or citizens of another EU Member State. Third-country nationals are predominantly occupied in the accommodation and food service activities sector, followed by the administrative and support service activities sector and the wholesale and retail trade; repair of motor vehicles and motorcycles sector. A closer look at the evolution of the sectors employing third-country nationals over the last years, however, indicates that in particular the information and communication technologies sector, the professional, scientific and technical activities sector and the financial and insurance activities sector register the most significant growth rates, leading to a development that seem to indicate a ‘double immigration’ of (highly) skilled migrants on the one hand and less or low skilled migrants in the more traditional economic sectors on the other hand. In regard to the general integration approach as well as the labour market integration policy, this study shows that Luxembourg does have not have a specific policy/strategic document/model in place that only focusses on third-country nationals. All political documents (laws and strategic documents such as the PAN 2010-2014 and the new PAN integration of 2018) and public measures (Welcome and Integration Contract (CAI), linguistic leave, support measures provided by the National Employment Agency (ADEM), measures facilitating school integration, electoral registration campaigns, etc.) are aimed at all foreign nationals without distinguishing between EU nationals and third-country nationals. It is the Immigration Law that provides the legal framework regarding the various grounds of migration for economic purposes. Additionally, the legislator aims to be attractive for certain categories of migrants coming to Luxembourg for economic purposes in order to meet the needs of the country’s economic development (via legislative measures such as the European Blue Card, the ‘investor’ residence permit or the agreement between Luxembourg and Cape Verde). This being said, this study will present examples of practices that have been identified as good practices in the context of the topic of labour market integration of third-country nationals, despite the fact that they, for the most part, do not fit 100% into the pre-set structure of the study template at hand. In section 2.2, three Member State measure are presented, the first of which is the linguistic leave, a specific form of additional special leave that is accessible for salaried and independent workers of all nationalities, resident or non-resident, to learn or perfect the command of the Luxembourgish language. This legislative measure was introduced by law in 2009 with the intention to facilitate the integration of the beneficiaries into society through the labour market. The second measure is the AMIF-project ‘InSitu JOBS’ by the non-governmental organisation CLAE asbl (with co-financing from the Luxembourgish State). This project, which ended in April 2018 was targeted at third-country nationals within the scope of this study as well as at beneficiaries of international protection by providing them information and counselling in the context of access and integration into the Luxembourgish labour market. The third measure was also an AMIF-project and consists of a practical guide that was developed and drafted by IMS Luxembourg, a network of Luxembourgish companies, in order to provide information on how to hire and integrate third-country nationals. As for the private sector measures in section 2.3. of this study, research of secondary resources as well as consultations with various relevant stakeholders proved to be rather difficult in terms of finding private sector initiatives that specifically target at supporting or facilitating the labour market integration of third-country nationals within the scope of this study. Two measures were selected in this context, the first consisting of a specific recruitment method (simulation-based recruitment method) by a large international company which allows them to evaluate various different profiles of people that are not necessarily detectable through the classic CV-based recruitment methods. The second measure is a business guide developed by the American Chamber of Commerce Luxembourg and aims to promote and facilitate the establishment of new business in Luxembourg by providing information on everything that entrepreneurs and international companies need to know in this context. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 130 (12 UL)
Full Text
See detailAnnual report on migration and asylum (2017)
Jacobs, Sarah UL; Adao Do Carmo, Kelly UL; Petry, David UL et al

Report (2018)

The present report provides an overview of the main developments and debates in relation to migration and asylum in Luxembourg in 2017. The number of people applying for international protection remained ... [more ▼]

The present report provides an overview of the main developments and debates in relation to migration and asylum in Luxembourg in 2017. The number of people applying for international protection remained high in 2017 (2.322 applications) compared to the levels registered pre- ‘migration crisis’ (1.091 in 2014). However, the number of registrations remained relatively stable if compared to the two preceding years (2.447 in 2015 and 2.035 in 2016). This relative stability in numbers also reflected on the general public and policy debate in the field of migration and asylum. Since 2016, its focus has continuously shifted from an ‘emergency’ discourse axed on the implementation of reception measures and conditions towards discussions on longer-term integration measures and policies. In this regard, the newly introduced Guided Integration Trail (parcours d’intégration accompagné - PIA) can be considered a flagship project of OLAI, the national agency responsible for the reception and integration of foreigners. This multidisciplinary package of measures aims to empower applicants and beneficiaries of international protection and to support them in developing their life project. The trail, compulsory for all adult applicants for international protection, consists of a linguistic component and a civic component and is split into three phases. Although increasing housing capacities for the reception of applicants for international protection was high on national authorities’ agenda, housing remained a challenging aspect of the asylum system and triggered debate on a national scale. Alongside access to training, problems related to housing were among the issues most frequently raised by applicants for international protection in 2017. The lack of affordable housing on the private market, an increasing number of family reunifications as well as the increasing number of beneficiaries and persons who have been issued a return decision who remain housed in structures of OLAI were all identified as interplaying barriers for finding available accommodation for applicants for international protection. The difficulties with the construction of modular housing structures also persisted in 2017. A certain reticence of the population towards the construction of these so-called ‘container villages, planned in response to the increasing influx that started in August 2015, was visible in the appeals introduced into Luxembourg’s First Instance Administrative Courts to annul the land-use plans related to the projects. Living conditions in the various reception facilities were also one of the subjects of discussion in 2017. This included a debate on the (lack of) kitchen infrastructure in reception facilities and the varying systems for provision of food, the types of food available, as well as the availability of internet. As an answer to the resurgence of an increased influx of applicants of international protection from the Western Balkans in early 2017, a new ‘ultra-accelerated procedure’ was put in place for applicants of international protection stemming from the Western Balkans. According to the state authorities, the ultra-accelerated procedure was set up to take pressure off the reception facilities, but also as a deterrent to avoid creating false hopes for long-term stay. In April 2017, a ‘semi-open return structure’ (Structure d’hébergement d’urgence au Kirchberg – SHUK) was put in place, from which people are transferred to states applying the Dublin regulation. Due to home custody (assignation à résidence), the SHUK is considered to be an alternative to detention by national authorities. The newly created structure as well as the related conditions for assignment, were nevertheless criticised by civil society. The outcry among civil society was equally high during and after the adoption the Law of 8 March 2017, which endorses the extension of the permitted period of detention of adults or families with children from 72 hours to 7 days, in order to improve the organisation of the return and ensures that it is carried out successfully. A commission in charge of determining the best interests of unaccompanied minors applying for international protection was decided at the end of 2017. The commission is in charge of carrying out individual assessments regarding the best interest of the child with the aim of delivering an authorisation of stay or a return decision. Among the elements taken into consideration when the best interest of the child is evaluated in the context of a potential return decision is information provided by the International Organization for Migration (IOM). The latter made an agreement with the Directorate of Immigration in 2017 to search for the parents of UAMs in the country of origin. With the focus of debates having slowly shifted towards long-term integration issues, the Council of Government also approved the elaboration of a new multiannual national action plan on integration. The plan will be based on two axes: (1) the reception and follow-up of applicants for international protection and (2) the integration of Luxembourg’s non-Luxembourgish residents. Luxembourg’s National Employment Agency (ADEM) set up a “cellule BPI” (beneficiaries of international protection cell) in its Employer Service in early 2017. This cell provides employers with information regarding job applications and evaluations of the competences of beneficiaries of international protection. A new law on the Luxembourgish nationality entered into force on 1 April 2017. Given the particular demographic situation of Luxembourg characterised by a significant increase in the total population and a decrease in the proportion of Luxembourgers in the total population, the reform intends to promote the societal and political integration of non-Luxembourgish citizens and to strengthen cohesion within the national community. The main changes introduced by the law include a decreased length of residence requirement for naturalisation (from 7 to 5 years), the right of birthplace (jus soli) of the first generation, a simplified way of acquiring Luxembourgish nationality by ‘option’, as well as new scenarios to avoid cases of statelessness. The law maintains previous linguistic requirements but makes some adjustments in order to prevent the language condition from becoming an insurmountable obstacle. Ahead of the local elections held on 8 October 2017, the Ministry of Family, Integration and the Greater Region launched a national information and awareness-raising campaign titled “Je peux voter” (I can vote) in January 2017. This campaign aimed to motivate Luxembourg’s foreign population to register on the electoral roll for the local elections. The government’s intention to legislate face concealment was arguably one of the most debated topics in the field related to community life and integration in the broader sense, both in parliament as well as in the media and public sphere. Bill n°7179 aims to modify article 563 of the Penal Code and to create the prohibition of face concealment in certain public spaces. The bill defines face concealment as the action of covering part of or all of the face in a way of rendering the identification of the person impossible and provides a wide variety of examples, such as the wearing of a motor cycle helmet, a balaclava or a full-face veil. Opposing views among stakeholders, whether political parties, public institutions, civil society or the media, emerged with regard to the necessity to legislate in the matter and if so, on the basis of which grounds and to what extent. The phenomenon of migration has also led to a more heterogeneous population in Luxembourg’s schools. To face this situation, the education authorities continued to diversify Luxembourg’s offer in education and training, creating for instance a bigger offer for youngsters and adults who do not master any of Luxembourg’s vehicular languages, offering more alphabetisation courses or basic instruction courses. The Minister for National Education continued to develop and adapt the school offer to the increased heterogeneity by increasing the international and European school offer, introducing of a new mediation service and putting in place a plurilingual education programme. In the area of legal migration, the most significant changes concerned admission policies of specific categories of third-country nationals. In this respect, bill n°7188 mainly aims to transpose Directive (EU) 2016/801 of the European Parliament and the Council of 11 May 2016 on the conditions of entry and residence of third-country nationals for the purposes of research, studies, training, voluntary service, pupil exchange schemes or educational projects and au pairing. The directive aims to make the European Union a world centre of excellence for studies and training, while favouring contacts between people and favouring their mobility, these two being important elements of the European Union’s external policy. Bill N°7188 intends to facilitate and simplify the procedures for intra-European mobility of TCN researchers and students. Moreover, the proposed changes include incentive mechanisms to retain students and researchers. To this end, it proposes that students and researchers, once they have completed their studies/research, can be issued a residence permit for “private reasons” for a duration of 9 months at most in view of finding employment or creating a business. Finally, bill n°7188 also foresees provisions to regulate the family reunification of a researcher staying in Luxembourg in the context of short- and long-term mobility with his/her nuclear family. The legislator furthermore transposed Directive 2014/36 on seasonal workers and Directive 2014/66 on temporary intragroup transfer into national law, and adapted Luxembourg’s immigration law to the needs to the economy, by introducing, amongst other things, and authorisation of stay for investors. Organising the admission of stay and the issuance of authorisations of stay was also a key component within the agreement between Luxembourg and Cape Verde on the concerted management of migratory flows and solidary development. Other objectives of the agreement include the promotion of the movement of people, detailing readmission procedures, fighting against irregular migration, strengthening the legal establishment and integration of the concerned nationals, as well as the mobilisation of skills and resources of migrants in favour of solidary development. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 161 (24 UL)
Full Text
See detailRapport annuel sur les migrations et l'asile (2017)
Jacobs, Sarah UL; Adao Do Carmo, Kelly UL; Petry, David UL et al

Report (2018)

The present report provides an overview of the main developments and debates in relation to migration and asylum in Luxembourg in 2017. The number of people applying for international protection remained ... [more ▼]

The present report provides an overview of the main developments and debates in relation to migration and asylum in Luxembourg in 2017. The number of people applying for international protection remained high in 2017 (2.322 applications) compared to the levels registered pre- ‘migration crisis’ (1.091 in 2014). However, the number of registrations remained relatively stable if compared to the two preceding years (2.447 in 2015 and 2.035 in 2016). This relative stability in numbers also reflected on the general public and policy debate in the field of migration and asylum. Since 2016, its focus has continuously shifted from an ‘emergency’ discourse axed on the implementation of reception measures and conditions towards discussions on longer-term integration measures and policies. In this regard, the newly introduced Guided Integration Trail (parcours d’intégration accompagné - PIA) can be considered a flagship project of OLAI, the national agency responsible for the reception and integration of foreigners. This multidisciplinary package of measures aims to empower applicants and beneficiaries of international protection and to support them in developing their life project. The trail, compulsory for all adult applicants for international protection, consists of a linguistic component and a civic component and is split into three phases. Although increasing housing capacities for the reception of applicants for international protection was high on national authorities’ agenda, housing remained a challenging aspect of the asylum system and triggered debate on a national scale. Alongside access to training, problems related to housing were among the issues most frequently raised by applicants for international protection in 2017. The lack of affordable housing on the private market, an increasing number of family reunifications as well as the increasing number of beneficiaries and persons who have been issued a return decision who remain housed in structures of OLAI were all identified as interplaying barriers for finding available accommodation for applicants for international protection. The difficulties with the construction of modular housing structures also persisted in 2017. A certain reticence of the population towards the construction of these so-called ‘container villages, planned in response to the increasing influx that started in August 2015, was visible in the appeals introduced into Luxembourg’s First Instance Administrative Courts to annul the land-use plans related to the projects. Living conditions in the various reception facilities were also one of the subjects of discussion in 2017. This included a debate on the (lack of) kitchen infrastructure in reception facilities and the varying systems for provision of food, the types of food available, as well as the availability of internet. As an answer to the resurgence of an increased influx of applicants of international protection from the Western Balkans in early 2017, a new ‘ultra-accelerated procedure’ was put in place for applicants of international protection stemming from the Western Balkans. According to the state authorities, the ultra-accelerated procedure was set up to take pressure off the reception facilities, but also as a deterrent to avoid creating false hopes for long-term stay. In April 2017, a ‘semi-open return structure’ (Structure d’hébergement d’urgence au Kirchberg – SHUK) was put in place, from which people are transferred to states applying the Dublin regulation. Due to home custody (assignation à résidence), the SHUK is considered to be an alternative to detention by national authorities. The newly created structure as well as the related conditions for assignment, were nevertheless criticised by civil society. The outcry among civil society was equally high during and after the adoption the Law of 8 March 2017, which endorses the extension of the permitted period of detention of adults or families with children from 72 hours to 7 days, in order to improve the organisation of the return and ensures that it is carried out successfully. A commission in charge of determining the best interests of unaccompanied minors applying for international protection was decided at the end of 2017. The commission is in charge of carrying out individual assessments regarding the best interest of the child with the aim of delivering an authorisation of stay or a return decision. Among the elements taken into consideration when the best interest of the child is evaluated in the context of a potential return decision is information provided by the International Organization for Migration (IOM). The latter made an agreement with the Directorate of Immigration in 2017 to search for the parents of UAMs in the country of origin. With the focus of debates having slowly shifted towards long-term integration issues, the Council of Government also approved the elaboration of a new multiannual national action plan on integration. The plan will be based on two axes: (1) the reception and follow-up of applicants for international protection and (2) the integration of Luxembourg’s non-Luxembourgish residents. Luxembourg’s National Employment Agency (ADEM) set up a “cellule BPI” (beneficiaries of international protection cell) in its Employer Service in early 2017. This cell provides employers with information regarding job applications and evaluations of the competences of beneficiaries of international protection. A new law on the Luxembourgish nationality entered into force on 1 April 2017. Given the particular demographic situation of Luxembourg characterised by a significant increase in the total population and a decrease in the proportion of Luxembourgers in the total population, the reform intends to promote the societal and political integration of non-Luxembourgish citizens and to strengthen cohesion within the national community. The main changes introduced by the law include a decreased length of residence requirement for naturalisation (from 7 to 5 years), the right of birthplace (jus soli) of the first generation, a simplified way of acquiring Luxembourgish nationality by ‘option’, as well as new scenarios to avoid cases of statelessness. The law maintains previous linguistic requirements but makes some adjustments in order to prevent the language condition from becoming an insurmountable obstacle. Ahead of the local elections held on 8 October 2017, the Ministry of Family, Integration and the Greater Region launched a national information and awareness-raising campaign titled “Je peux voter” (I can vote) in January 2017. This campaign aimed to motivate Luxembourg’s foreign population to register on the electoral roll for the local elections. The government’s intention to legislate face concealment was arguably one of the most debated topics in the field related to community life and integration in the broader sense, both in parliament as well as in the media and public sphere. Bill n°7179 aims to modify article 563 of the Penal Code and to create the prohibition of face concealment in certain public spaces. The bill defines face concealment as the action of covering part of or all of the face in a way of rendering the identification of the person impossible and provides a wide variety of examples, such as the wearing of a motor cycle helmet, a balaclava or a full-face veil. Opposing views among stakeholders, whether political parties, public institutions, civil society or the media, emerged with regard to the necessity to legislate in the matter and if so, on the basis of which grounds and to what extent. The phenomenon of migration has also led to a more heterogeneous population in Luxembourg’s schools. To face this situation, the education authorities continued to diversify Luxembourg’s offer in education and training, creating for instance a bigger offer for youngsters and adults who do not master any of Luxembourg’s vehicular languages, offering more alphabetisation courses or basic instruction courses. The Minister for National Education continued to develop and adapt the school offer to the increased heterogeneity by increasing the international and European school offer, introducing of a new mediation service and putting in place a plurilingual education programme. In the area of legal migration, the most significant changes concerned admission policies of specific categories of third-country nationals. In this respect, bill n°7188 mainly aims to transpose Directive (EU) 2016/801 of the European Parliament and the Council of 11 May 2016 on the conditions of entry and residence of third-country nationals for the purposes of research, studies, training, voluntary service, pupil exchange schemes or educational projects and au pairing. The directive aims to make the European Union a world centre of excellence for studies and training, while favouring contacts between people and favouring their mobility, these two being important elements of the European Union’s external policy. Bill N°7188 intends to facilitate and simplify the procedures for intra-European mobility of TCN researchers and students. Moreover, the proposed changes include incentive mechanisms to retain students and researchers. To this end, it proposes that students and researchers, once they have completed their studies/research, can be issued a residence permit for “private reasons” for a duration of 9 months at most in view of finding employment or creating a business. Finally, bill n°7188 also foresees provisions to regulate the family reunification of a researcher staying in Luxembourg in the context of short- and long-term mobility with his/her nuclear family. The legislator furthermore transposed Directive 2014/36 on seasonal workers and Directive 2014/66 on temporary intragroup transfer into national law, and adapted Luxembourg’s immigration law to the needs to the economy, by introducing, amongst other things, and authorisation of stay for investors. Organising the admission of stay and the issuance of authorisations of stay was also a key component within the agreement between Luxembourg and Cape Verde on the concerted management of migratory flows and solidary development. Other objectives of the agreement include the promotion of the movement of people, detailing readmission procedures, fighting against irregular migration, strengthening the legal establishment and integration of the concerned nationals, as well as the mobilisation of skills and resources of migrants in favour of solidary development. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 182 (25 UL)
Full Text
See detailA Dynamic Approach for Combining Abstract Argumentation Semantics – Technical Report
Dauphin, Jérémie UL; Cramer, Marcos UL; van der Torre, Leon UL

Report (2018)

Abstract argumentation semantics provide a direct relation from an argumentation framework to corresponding sets of acceptable arguments, or equivalently to labeling functions. Instead, we study step-wise ... [more ▼]

Abstract argumentation semantics provide a direct relation from an argumentation framework to corresponding sets of acceptable arguments, or equivalently to labeling functions. Instead, we study step-wise update relations on argumentation frameworks whose fixpoints represent the labeling functions on the arguments. We make use of this dynamic approach in order to study novel ways of combining abstract argumentation semantics. In particular, we introduce the notion of a merge of two argumentation semantics, which is defined in such a way that the merge of the preferred and the grounded semantics is the complete semantics. Finally we consider how to define new semantics using the merge operator, in particular how meaningfully combine features of naive-based and complete-based semantics. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 87 (12 UL)
Full Text
See detailDetecting Document Fraud
Sommarribas, Adolfo UL

Report (2018)

The high numbers and mixed flows of migrants entering the EU during the migration crisis in recent years has meant that the effective identification of third-country nationals has become a concern of ... [more ▼]

The high numbers and mixed flows of migrants entering the EU during the migration crisis in recent years has meant that the effective identification of third-country nationals has become a concern of increasing importance. One of the main issues around the use of documents to establish identity has been the risk of document fraud. This includes the production and use by third-country nationals of false documents, as well as the use of fraudulently obtained genuine documents (‘FOG’s) in procedures relating to entry and stay in Member States. The examination of documents such as passports and other travel documents are only part of identification procedures; however, given that they may contain biometric information such as facial image and iris data, the role they play in identification is significant. Where third-country nationals are unable to fulfil the criteria for legal entry using legitimate documents and channels, or seek to disguise or assume a different identity, document fraud can open alternative channels to entering Member States. In terms of understanding the scale of and trends in document fraud, according to Frontex’s Risk Analysis Report 2018, Member States reported some 6 700 third-country nationals presenting false documents at the EU / Schengen borders in 2017, and identified this as the lowest number of detections since 2013.1 The decreasing trend at the border, however, contrasts with an increase of 9% in detections within the EU/Schengen area, the second highest number of detections since 2013.2 This Inform aims to establish the current state of play in detecting document fraud perpetrated by third-country nationals intending to enter and stay in the EU Member States and Norway, including in the context of asylum procedures. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 121 (12 UL)
Full Text
See detailMapping mobility – pathways, institutions and structural effects of youth mobility, Final Public Project Report
Samuk, Sahizer UL; Nienaber, Birte UL; Bissinger, Jutta UL et al

Report (2018)

This report is a synthesis of the main results of the H2020 project MOVE – Mapping mobility, institutions and structural effects of youth mobility in Europe. Over three years the project MOVE has provided ... [more ▼]

This report is a synthesis of the main results of the H2020 project MOVE – Mapping mobility, institutions and structural effects of youth mobility in Europe. Over three years the project MOVE has provided a research-informed contribution to a systematic analysis of intra-European mobility. The project departed its work by differentiating six mobility types that have diverse institutional frameworks, age specific constraints and scopes of action. The project has thus analysed and reconstructed mobility patterns that lie across different types of mobility, which are: • student mobility for higher education, • international volunteering, • employment mobility, • mobility for vocational and educational training, • pupil’s exchange, • entrepreneurship mobility. These identified six mobility types have been investigated in the following six European countries: • Germany, • Hungary, • Luxembourg, • Norway, • Romania and • Spain. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 136 (9 UL)
Full Text
See detail(Member) States' Approaches to Unaccompanied Minors Following Status Determination
Petry, Ralph UL; Sommarribas, Adolfo UL; Adao Do Carmo, Kelly UL et al

Report (2018)

The legal framework in Luxembourg does not provide a specific legal status for unaccompanied minors (hereafter UAM), which is why the large majority of them apply for international protection. This allows ... [more ▼]

The legal framework in Luxembourg does not provide a specific legal status for unaccompanied minors (hereafter UAM), which is why the large majority of them apply for international protection. This allows them to stay in the country and to benefit from social and legal assistance, as well as from accommodation. Cases of UAMs presumed or identified victims of human trafficking are rare in Luxembourg. Overall, specific legal frameworks exist according to the status of the UAM: The Law on Asylum, the Law on Immigration and the Law on victims of trafficking in human beings. This framework is completed by general provisions of the Youth Protection Law, which applies to all minors independent of their immigration or legal status. Until the influx of applicants for international protection in 2015 and 2016, the phenomenon of unaccompanied minors has been relatively small in Luxembourg. Particularly 2015 was marked by a high number of UAMs applying for international protection, with 102 introductions of applications compared to 31 applications in 2014. Since, the number of applications has stabilised over the last two years, with 51 applications in 2016 and 50 applications in 2017. In 2015, Afghanistan and Albania were the leading countries of origin of UAMs. In 2016, Afghanistan was still the leading country of origin, followed by Morocco. In 2017, the profiles of the UAMs changed again, with Albania and Morocco as leading countries of origin. In Luxembourg, UAMs are predominantly boys and a large majority is close to the age of majority, or have already reached the age of majority, when a final decision on their application for international protection is issued. However, the Directorate of Immigration reported that they were confronted with a new phenomenon in 2017, namely the arrival of very young UAMs aged between 12 and 14. Every UAM, whether s/he files an application for international protection or not, will be assigned an ad-hoc administrator as soon as possible in order to assist him/her in all legal proceedings. In addition to the designation of an ad-hoc administrator, the organisations that accommodate the UAMs applying for international protection usually request the guardianship (either institutional or personal guardianship) of the UAM who has introduced his application. Different from the ad-hoc administrator, the guardian is assisting and supporting the UAM in all daily life affairs, such as social guidance, integration, education, medical care, acquisition of language skills, leisure activities, etc. In regard to education, the overall aim in Luxembourg is to integrate migrant children, independent of their immigration status, into the general educational system as soon as possible. The latter has experienced a diversification of its offer with a number of specialised measures and services. Together with leisure and extracurricular activities, school is considered to be one of the main contributors to the overall well-being and integration of UAMs into the Luxembourgish society. There are no integration measures that specifically target UAMs. There are no specific transition measures or procedures for UAMs who are approaching their majority, neither in regard to the accommodation and guardianship arrangements, nor in the general context of integration. The organisations responsible for the accommodation and care of the UAMs provide them with a supervision and support according to their specific individual needs. This is also true for the respective legal framework of the UAM, including eventual extensions of residence permits. The return of UAMs is considered to be rare in the Luxembourgish context. As mentioned earlier, this is related to the fact that the large majority of UAMs applying for international protection are close to the age of majority or have already reached majority when a final decision on their application is issued. Furthermore, although foreseen by the Immigration Law, Luxembourg does not carry out forced returns of persons considered to be unaccompanied minors. The International Organisation for Migration (IOM), responsible for (assisted) voluntary returns, reported that they have approximately one voluntary return of an UAM every two years. In 2017, following the recommendation of the evaluation of the Schengen acquis in the area of return in Luxembourg, the government adopted the creation of a new commission with the function of assessing the best interest of the child in the context of return of UAMs. This commission entered into force at the beginning of 2018 and is composed of members of the prosecution service, the National Childhood Office (ONE), the Luxembourg Reception and Integration Agency (OLAI), and finally the Directorate of Immigration, which is chairing the commission. In addition, the ad-hoc administrator is invited to attend the commission meeting for the minor s/he represents. Based on the elements of his/her application, an individual opinion assessing the best interest of the child, in the context of his/her return, will be given for each minor. One of the major reported challenges is the appointment of legal representatives of UAMs (ad-hoc administrator and guardian), as well as the lack of precision of the legal provisions in this context. In the context of return, the Directorate of Immigration reported that they are faced with challenges in regard to getting in contact with the respective countries of origin as well as in regard to cases of applicants not telling the truth. One of the main good practices that has been identified by a number of stakeholders are the new care and accommodation arrangements, allowing to house UAMs in specifically dedicated reception facilities with a 24/7 supervision, depending on the availability of these facilities. In the same context, it was reported that it is of great importance to provide the minors with an environment of trust and support, to listen to them and to reassure them in order to be able to understand their current situation. Particularly the approach of supporting them in elaborating a life plan or life project (“projet de vie”) is considered as being very important for the stability and general well-being as well as for the integration of the UAMs. In addition, it is also important to support them in other matters of integration, such as education, acquisition of language skills, extracurricular activities, etc. In the context of return, Directorate of Immigration reported the newly concluded agreement with IOM in order to conduct family assessments of UAMs in the countries of origin as a good practice. On the one hand, this assessment is one element that will be taken into consideration in the examination of the application of the minor. On the other hand, it helps in assessing the best interest of the child in the event of a return if the application is rejected. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 116 (10 UL)
Full Text
See detailUniversity of California, Berkeley, Institute of European Studies (IES) Fall 2017 Newsletter
Institute of European Studies, UC Berkeley; Paravantis, Spero UL

Report (2018)

The Fall 2017 newsletter of the University of California, Berkeley, Institute of European Studies (IES). I was a Visiting Scholar at IES from August 2017 to Feb 2018, and from March 1st 2018, I will ... [more ▼]

The Fall 2017 newsletter of the University of California, Berkeley, Institute of European Studies (IES). I was a Visiting Scholar at IES from August 2017 to Feb 2018, and from March 1st 2018, I will become an IES Senior Fellow. My bio is on page 8, and summaries of my lectures are on page 30 (Migration) and 31 (WWI and WWII Reparations and European Integration). [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 263 (5 UL)
Full Text
See detailTutorial Big Data Analytics: Overview and Practical Examples
Varrette, Sébastien UL

Report (2018)

This tutorial will offer a synthetic view of Big Data Analytics challenges, the tools permitting to address these challenges and focus on one of these tool through a practical session with a set of ... [more ▼]

This tutorial will offer a synthetic view of Big Data Analytics challenges, the tools permitting to address these challenges and focus on one of these tool through a practical session with a set of concrete examples. Level: beginner - advanced [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 91 (0 UL)
Full Text
See detailInternational preconference and conference report
Kmiotek-Meier, Emilia Alicja UL; Walker, Jessica

Report (2018)

Detailed reference viewed: 58 (2 UL)
Full Text
See detailThe 50th Anniversary of the Rescue and Return Agreement: Relevance and Challenges
Salmeri, Antonino UL

Report (2018)

Report of the IISL/ECSL Symposium on the occasion of the 57th Session of the UNCOPUOS Legal Subcommittee, 2018 Proceedings of the IISL

Detailed reference viewed: 75 (0 UL)
Full Text
See detailOn Rational Entailment for Propositional Typicality Logic
Casini, Giovanni UL; Meyer, Thomas; Varzinczak, Ivan et al

Report (2018)

Propositional Typicality Logic (PTL) is a recently proposed logic, obtained by enriching classical propositional logic with a typicality operator capturing the most typical (alias normal or conventional ... [more ▼]

Propositional Typicality Logic (PTL) is a recently proposed logic, obtained by enriching classical propositional logic with a typicality operator capturing the most typical (alias normal or conventional) situations in which a given sentence holds. The semantics of PTL is in terms of ranked models as studied in the well-known KLM approach to preferential reasoning and therefore KLM-style rational consequence relations can be embedded in PTL. In spite of the non-monotonic features introduced by the semantics adopted for the typicality operator, the obvious Tarskian definition of entailment for PTL remains monotonic and is therefore not appropriate in many contexts. Our first important result is an impossibility theorem showing that a set of proposed postulates that at first all seem appropriate for a notion of entailment with regard to typicality cannot be satisfied simultaneously. Closer inspection reveals that this result is best interpreted as an argument for advocating the development of more than one type of PTL entailment. In the spirit of this interpretation, we investigate three different (semantic) versions of entailment for PTL, each one based on the definition of rational closure as introduced by Lehmann and Magidor for KLM-style conditionals, and constructed using different notions of minimality. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 96 (0 UL)
Full Text
See detailAbstract and Concrete Decision Graphs for Choosing Extensions of Argumentation Frameworks - Technical Report
Dauphin, Jérémie UL; Cramer, Marcos UL; van der Torre, Leon UL

Report (2018)

Most argumentation semantics allow for multiple extensions, which raises the question of how to choose among extensions. We propose to study this question as a decision problem. Inspired by decision trees ... [more ▼]

Most argumentation semantics allow for multiple extensions, which raises the question of how to choose among extensions. We propose to study this question as a decision problem. Inspired by decision trees commonly used in economics, we introduce the notion of a decision graph for deciding between the multiple extensions of a given AF in a given semantics. We distinguish between abstract decision graphs and concrete instantiations thereof. Inspired by the principle-based approach to argumentation, we formulate two principles that mappings from argumentation frameworks to decision graphs should satisfy, the principle of decision-graph directionality and the one of directional decision-making. We then propose a concrete instantiation of decision graphs, which satisfies one of these principles. Finally, we discuss the potential for further research based on this novel methodology. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 95 (4 UL)
Full Text
See detailModelling argumentation on Axiom of Choice in ASPIC-END -- Technical report
Cramer, Marcos UL

Report (2017)

In this technical report, we present an application of the structured argumentation methodology to a debate in the foundations of mathematics. We work with ASPIC-END, a recently proposed adaptation of the ... [more ▼]

In this technical report, we present an application of the structured argumentation methodology to a debate in the foundations of mathematics. We work with ASPIC-END, a recently proposed adaptation of the structured argumentation framework ASPIC+ which can incorporate debates about logical principles, natural deduction style arguments and explanations. We apply this framework to build a preliminary formal model of parts of the debate that mathematicians had about the Axiom of Choice in the early 20th century. Furthermore, we briefly discuss the insight into the strengths and drawbacks of the modeling capacities of ASPIC-END that we have gained from producing this model. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 79 (4 UL)
Full Text
See detailThe effectiveness of return in EU Member States: challenges and good practices linked to EU rules and standards
Sommarribas, Adolfo UL; Petry, David UL; Nienaber, Birte UL

Report (2017)

The impact of EU rules on Luxembourg’s return policies and practices is substantial. This is not least a result of the transposition of Directive 2008/115/EC on return into national law by the Law of 1 ... [more ▼]

The impact of EU rules on Luxembourg’s return policies and practices is substantial. This is not least a result of the transposition of Directive 2008/115/EC on return into national law by the Law of 1 July 2011, which was then further developed through amendments in 2014 following the conclusions of the European Commission that Luxembourg was not fully in line with the directive. With regards to the European Commission Recommendation of 7th March 2017 ‘on making returns more effective when implementing the Directive 2008/115/EC’, Luxembourg did not introduce any specific legal or policy change. Most of the referenced provisions already form part of the national legal and/or policy framework. The government’s efforts to conclude and apply readmission agreements with third-countries to better organise returns have continued throughout 2016. The Benelux Member States concluded a readmission agreement and a protocol of implementation with the Republic of Kazakhstan on 2 March 2015, which was approved by Law of 31 August 2016. As a result of the relatively high influx of asylum-seekers in 2015/2016, a backlog in the processing of applications for international protection occurred and could only be properly addressed by the Refugees and Return Department of the Directorate of Immigration through an increase and a reorganisation of its administrative staff. On the other side, the impact of the migration situation 2015/2016 did not significantly affect the functioning of the Detention Centre nor its maximum occupation limits. However, the Detention Centre took over the management of the SHUK (Structure d’hébergement d’urgence Kirchberg) a new semi-open facility established for Dublin cases (single men) with a view of transferring them to the responsible Member State. Although vulnerable groups are generally not detained in Luxembourg, the permitted period of detention of families with children was recently (March 2017) extended from 72 hours to 7 days with a view to enhancing the organisation of their return. The controversial extension through law amendment was largely criticised by civil society organisations and hence debated in parliament. The definition of guarantees to avoid the risk of absconding remains a major challenge in the field of return and (alternatives to) detention. In most cases, the applicant fails to provide evidence enabling the reversal of the legal presumption of the existence of a risk of absconding, allowing the Minister to use a detention measure instead of another less coercive measure. As long as the concerned third-country national is unable to indicate a fixed address of stay (reception facilities are not taken into account), the competent authorities cannot rule out the existence of a risk of absconding. The practical implementation of ‘home custody’ as an alternative to detention is therefore considered problematic, with most potential candidates not having a fixed address in Luxembourg. The substantial amount of the financial guarantee, 5.000€, make it also difficult to practically implement release on bail as an alternative. Although the Law foresees the possibility of combining home custody with electronic surveillance, the electronic tag has not yet been implemented. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 87 (9 UL)
Full Text
See detailChallenges and practices for establishing applicants’ identity in the migration process
Sommarribas, Adolfo UL; Petry, Ralph UL; Nienaber, Birte UL

Report (2017)

In Luxembourg, the procedure for identity verification/establishment in the context of international protection is separated from the decision-making procedure as such. While the authority for granting ... [more ▼]

In Luxembourg, the procedure for identity verification/establishment in the context of international protection is separated from the decision-making procedure as such. While the authority for granting international protection status lies with the Ministry in charge of Immigration (Directorate of Immigration), the Judicial Police is in charge of identity verification/establishment. For this means, the applicant will be interviewed with regard to his/her travel itinerary, including questions on border crossing and used means of transports to arrive in Luxembourg. During the last few years, the large majority of international protection applications in Luxembourg have come from persons originating from the Western Balkan countries (in 2016 they represent 35% of the applicants). Concerning these applicants, most of them (85% to 90%) have presented valid identity documents to the authorities in Luxembourg. However, with the migration crisis there is a growing number of international protection applicants coming from the Middle East and North Africa and who cannot produce valid identity documents. National authorities have always been confronted with lacking identity documents, predominantly observable among applicants from African countries. In some cases, identity documents were intentionally destroyed or withheld from the authorities in order to avoid being identified. If credible identity documents are lacking, the identification procedure can become complicated and resource consuming, and the responsible authorities, especially the Police, have a limited set of methods and means available (provided for in the Asylum Law). [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 95 (18 UL)
Full Text
See detailAbschlussbericht zum Forschungsprojekt "Bewegter Unterricht in Luxemburg"
Bund, Andreas UL; Scheuer, Claude

Report (2017)

Das Konzept der Bewegten Schule geht auf den Schweizer Pädagogen Urs Illi zurück, der es Mitte der achtziger Jahre vor allem für den Primarbereich entwickelte (Illi, 1995). Ausgehend von einer medizinisch ... [more ▼]

Das Konzept der Bewegten Schule geht auf den Schweizer Pädagogen Urs Illi zurück, der es Mitte der achtziger Jahre vor allem für den Primarbereich entwickelte (Illi, 1995). Ausgehend von einer medizinisch-gesundheitlichen (Bewegung als Gesundheitsressource) und entwick-lungs- und lerntheoretischen (Bewegung als zentrales Element der Kindesentwicklung, Bewe-gung als zusätzlicher Sinnes- und Erfahrungskanal) Begründung, geht es in diesem Konzept grundsätzlich darum, mehr Bewegung in die traditionelle „Sitzschule“ zu bringen. Am Projekt „Bewegter Unterricht in Luxemburg“ nahmen die SchülerInnen und Lehrkräfte der Grundschulen in Angelsberg, Larochette, Nommern, Lintgen und Vichten teil. An den Schulen Angelsberg, Larochette und Nommern fand im Untersuchungszeitraum von September 2014 bis Juni 2016 durchgehend Bewegter Unterricht statt. Diese Schulen werden im Weiteren als „Projektschulen“ bezeichnet. An den Schulen in Lintgen und Vichten wurde nicht „bewegt“ unterrichtet; diese Schulen dienten somit als Kontrollschulen. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 398 (12 UL)
Full Text
See detailIllegal employment of Third-Country Nationals in the EU
Sommarribas, Adolfo UL; Petry, Ralph UL; Nienaber, Birte UL

Report (2017)

Illegal employment by third country nationals is a reality in Luxembourg. However, as well as in the case of grey and informal economy, it is rather hard to grasp or quantify to which extent. Nevertheless ... [more ▼]

Illegal employment by third country nationals is a reality in Luxembourg. However, as well as in the case of grey and informal economy, it is rather hard to grasp or quantify to which extent. Nevertheless, the problem is not as significant as the one of the posted workers which is more relevant and worrisome and needs to be situated in the context of a labour market of the Greater Region. In the past, several labour related regularisation measures have been implemented in Luxembourg in order to provide both employers and employees the possibility to regularise situations of illegal employment. The last labour related regularisation measure was implemented in early 2013 in the context of the transposition of the Employers' Sanctions Directive 2009/52 by law of 21 December 2012. During this regularisation, the Directorate of Immigration received 664 applications. These regularisations give a partial indication of the extent of the phenomenon, even though these numbers do not provide a real picture of the problem because the conditions of this regularisation were very strict and in a very short time frame (less than two months) and a certain number of irregular migrants’ workers were not willing to expose themselves by applying and preferred to remain undetected. This regularisation also provided information on the main sectors were the phenomenon is found in order of importance: HORECA, cleaning, crafts, industry and construction. The Ministry of Labour, Employment and Social and Solidary Economy at the end of the regularisation has insisted in the need to increase the number of controls to employers. The law of 21 December 2012 established administrative as well as criminal sanctions for employers who illegally employ irregularly staying third country nationals, particularly in relation to offenses to the Labour Code in aggravating circumstances. This law amended also article 89 of the Immigration Law abrogating the possibility of making labour related regularisations. The Inspectorate of Labour (‘Inspection de Travail et des Mines’, hereafter called ITM), which is in charge of labour inspections and the control of illegal employment of TCNs in Luxembourg, is currently going through a restructuring phase following the latest audit of this administration from January 2015. Particularly the current insufficient number of staff of the ITM, which is in need of a significant short term increase of staff, represents a main challenge in the field of illegal employment in Luxembourg. It is also in the context of this restructuring phase of the responsible administration that the drafting of this study presented a number of challenges, especially in relation to the operational and statistical part of the template. The information regarding the conditions to be fulfilled by both the employers and the employees in the context of an employment relationship are available on the website of the concerned authorities. Furthermore, they are disseminated by the NGOs working in the field, even though there are no specific campaigns targeted to prevent illegal employment of TCNs. The matter was raised in the context of the ‘social identification badge’, which was introduced in 2013 in order to fight against social dumping in particular in the construction sector. One national stakeholder suggested that the ‘social identification badge’ could be revised and adapted to other economic sectors in order to better monitor and prevent illegal employment. In regards to access to justice and enforcement of rights of illegally employed TCNs, Luxembourg foresees the right for illegally employed TCNs to make a claim against their employer, including in cases in which they have, or have been, returned. This claim falls under the general provisions concerning the right to bring a case before civil courts. The Labour Code establishes that the employer who has employed an irregular staying third-country national must pay to the third-country national the following amounts: 1) salaries and any other emoluments, which a similar employee would have benefited for the same employment; 2) the total amount of outstanding remuneration as well as the cost of the transfer of these amounts to the third-country national to the country to which s/he is returned; 3) the total amount of unpaid social contributions and taxes, including administrative fines, as well as, court and legal fees. In addition, the Labour Code establishes that the third-country national who has been illegally employed before the execution of any return decision has to be systematically and objectively informed by the control agents of his/her rights to recover the outstanding remunerations and back payments, as well as the right to benefit from free of charge legal aid in order to attempt a recovery action against the employer, even if the third-country national has already been returned. Labour unions can support and assist TCNs in legal proceedings related to social and labour law, provided that they have been given a mandate to do so. Eventual costs of administrative and civil proceedings can be taken in charge by the labour unions if the TCN is a member of the respective labour union. The Law does not establish fines against TCN’s who were illegally employed. The TCN may be issued a return decision and lose his/her residence rights; however, the Directorate of immigration processes these situations on a case-by-case basis and inform the persons concerned to terminate the illegal employment situation. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 182 (15 UL)
Full Text
See detailFamily reunification of third-country nationals in the EU: national practices (country report Luxembourg)
Petry, David UL; Jacobs, Sarah UL; Sommarribas, Adolfo UL et al

Report (2017)

In Luxembourg, family reunification is one of the main reasons for immigration of third-country nationals. In fact, “family member” and “private reasons (family links)” residence permits (first deliveries ... [more ▼]

In Luxembourg, family reunification is one of the main reasons for immigration of third-country nationals. In fact, “family member” and “private reasons (family links)” residence permits (first deliveries and renewals) represented more than a third of all residence permits issued during the last three years. While the right to family reunification was solely provided by international law and regulated by administrative practice until 2008, the transposition of Directive 2003/86/EC of 22 September 2003 on the right to family reunification led to a much more precise and detailed legal framework. A notable change in legislation has been proposed with the introduction of bill n° 6992 , namely the harmonisation of the conditions that apply to third-country national employees with those of Blue Card holders and researchers. Thus, family reunification requirements for certain categories of applicants shall be alleviated through the abrogation of the 12-month residence requirement for the sponsor. In order to apply for family reunification in Luxembourg, sponsors have to meet a number of requirements for exercising the right to family reunification, which include the provision of suitable accommodation for the size of their family; meeting health and safety standards; health insurance; as well as stable and regular resources to provide for themselves and their family members. As recommended by Directive 2003/86/EC, Luxembourg sets out more favourable conditions to beneficiaries of international protection for the exercise of their right to family reunification. Thus, they do not have to comply with the above-mentioned requirements in case they apply for family reunification within 3 months of being granted the status. Family members who have come to Luxembourg under family reunification have access to education, orientation, vocational training, lifelong learning and professional retraining once their residence permit has been issued. Family members furthermore have access to the labour market. In case the family member has resided in Luxembourg for less than one year when the application is submitted, it will be submitted to the labour market test. Family members can also, under a number of conditions, benefit from guaranteed minimum income, social aid, long-term residence status as well as citizenship. National stakeholders noted that the requirement of finding appropriate accommodation and proving stable and regular resources is one of the main challenges for sponsors. For family members as well as sponsors, having sufficient financial resources to cover the costs of family reunification can be another challenge to accessing family reunification. Family members of beneficiaries of international protection in particular face the more procedural challenge of providing proof of identity and family links, which can be difficult due to lacking documentation, differing administrative practices in the country of origin and/or the lack of cooperation of institutions. Gaining access to family reunification is also particularly difficult for beneficiaries of international protection who arrived in Luxembourg as unaccompanied minors but reached adulthood during the examination of their file, as they must provide proof of their family member’s dependency upon them. The limited number of diplomatic representations of Luxembourg abroad poses a challenge both to family members who must present themselves there, as well as for the Luxembourgish authorities who require information on certain countries. Perceived as a best practice with regard to family reunification are the information that NGOs and the lawyers in the field of migration and asylum provide to beneficiaries of international protection with regard to procedures of family reunification, thereby contributing to the beneficiary’s ability to enter an application for family reunification within the 3-month period. The practice of accepting the submission of an application of family members of beneficiaries of international protection that contains only a commencement of proof of family links and allowing for the finalisation at a later date is also perceived as a good practice, as it enables them to exercise their right to family reunification while benefitting from more favourable conditions. Furthermore, the issuance of a “laisser-passer” for beneficiaries of international protection who cannot obtain travel documents is perceived as a big step forward by national stakeholders. Lastly, Restoring Family Links, a service provided by the Luxembourgish Red Cross, is also considered a reliable tool with regard to tracing missing family members abroad. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 352 (50 UL)
Full Text
See detailLieux en travail - Bonnevoie en mouvement
Haas, Claude UL; Marthaler, Thomas UL; Uhler, Nicolas

Report (2017)

Detailed reference viewed: 126 (5 UL)
Full Text
See detailThe changing influx of asylum seekers in 2014-2016: Member State responses (Country Report Luxembourg)
Jacobs, Sarah UL; Adao Do Carmo, Kelly UL; Petry, David UL et al

Report (2017)

Applications for international protection significantly increased in Luxembourg from August 2015 onwards, the total number of applications in fact more than doubling when compared to the previous year (2 ... [more ▼]

Applications for international protection significantly increased in Luxembourg from August 2015 onwards, the total number of applications in fact more than doubling when compared to the previous year (2.447 applicants in 2015; 1.091 in 2014). The number of applications remained high in 2016 (2.035 applications) and 2017 (2.322 applications) albeit slightly decreasing when compared to 2015. These figures are not unprecedented. The number of applications introduced in Luxembourg have fluctuated since 1999, the peaks and declines correlating with specific events. Luxembourg received 2.920 applications for international protection in 1999, an effect of the conflict in Kosovo. Later, the country saw two more peaks in applications after the turn of the century (2003 and 2004 with 1.550 and 1.577 applications respectively, 2011 and 2012 with 2.171 and 2.057 applications respectively). On the other hand, 2005 to 2010 can be characterised as a period of relative calm.The current period of higher arrivals of applicants for international protection is characterised by a change in cultural profile. Previously, most of the time, a majority of people applying for international protection in Luxembourg stemmed from European countries. The influx of applicants in 2015 and 2016 was characterised by the arrival of people stemming from Arabic-speaking countries, populations which had been relatively small in Luxembourg up to that point.While not necessarily unprecedented in magnitude,high numbers of monthly arrivals, especially in the last months of 2015, put those in charge of registering applications as well as of housing and providing social follow-up to the test and led to a number of measures being taken.Generally speaking, fromthe beginning of the increased arrivals in Luxembourg in 2015, the government adopted a relatively open and welcoming position. This position is illustrated for instance in the government’s stance in favour of a solution for the reception of applicants for international protection that is based on European solidarity and the government’s investment in relocation and resettlement. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 100 (6 UL)
Full Text
See detailExtending Typicality for Description Logics
Booth, Richard; Casini, Giovanni UL; Meyer, Thomas et al

Report (2017)

Recent extensions of description logics for dealing with different forms of non-monotonic reasoning don’t take us beyond the case of defeasible subsumption. In this paper we enrich the DL EL⊥ with a ... [more ▼]

Recent extensions of description logics for dealing with different forms of non-monotonic reasoning don’t take us beyond the case of defeasible subsumption. In this paper we enrich the DL EL⊥ with a (constrained version of) a typicality operator •, the intuition of which is to capture the most typical members of a class, providing us with the DL EL•⊥. We argue that EL•⊥ is the smallest step one can take to increase the expressivity beyond the case of defeasible subsumption for DLs, while still retaining all the rationality properties an appropriate notion of defeasible subsumption is required to satisfy, and investigate what an appropriate notion of non-monotonic entailment for EL•⊥ should look like. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 88 (4 UL)
See detailAlt werden mit Behinderung
Scheier, Elisabeth UL; Schmalenberg, Annika; Kaulfuß, Lutz et al

Report (2017)

Detailed reference viewed: 36 (2 UL)
Full Text
See detailPolicy Report on Migration and Asylum (2016)
Petry, David UL; Jacobs, Sarah UL; Nienaber, Birte UL

Report (2017)

The present report provides an overview of the main debates and developments in relation to migration and asylum in Luxembourg in 2016. The issue of migration remained on the forefront of public and ... [more ▼]

The present report provides an overview of the main debates and developments in relation to migration and asylum in Luxembourg in 2016. The issue of migration remained on the forefront of public and political debate, a debate axed on both planned legislative changes as well as the concrete migratory situation in Luxembourg. Four topics dominated public and policy discussions over the course of the year: the reform on Luxembourgish nationality, economic migration, the organisation of reception, as well as support and integration measures, linked to the continued inflow of applicants for international protection (AIPs) in 2016 and steps taken to adapt formal and informal education to the increasing heterogeneity of Luxembourg’s population. The debate on international protection that arose in 2015 was carried onward in 2016, the focus shifting towards reception, support and integration measures. As the inflow of AIPs remained relatively high in 2016 with 2.043 applications, Luxembourg’s Reception and Integration Agency (OLAI) warned throughout the year that the country’s structures would soon reach the limits of their capacity. Linked to the high recognition rate, the legal challenges that local residents put to the plans for the construction of new reception facilities and the difficulty of beneficiaries of international protection (BIPs) in finding appropriate accommodation, the perceived dearth of housing was discussed broadly by the public, the media, as well as civil society and political actors. The continued inflow of AIPs also put a strain on the concerned administrations, both in terms of financial and human resources, leading to discussions regarding the duration of procedures and the variations of this duration. Moreover, the question of integration or support measures for beneficiaries and applicants stepped to the forefront: the changed profile of people arriving in Luxembourg posed new challenges to language learning and education for the newly arrived, and overall, emphasised the need to adapt existing and create new integration and support measures for beneficiaries and applicants. At the same time, the role of non-governmental organisations in supporting the government in the reception of applicants and in establishing new projects facilitating their integration also grew over the course of 2016, not least due to over 80 projects being granted funding by the Oeuvre Nationale de Secours Grande Duchesse Charlotte (henceforth Oeuvre). The Luxembourgish Centre for Integration and Social Cohesion (LISKO), part of the Red Cross and supported by convention to the Ministry for Family and Integration opened its doors in April 2016. The newly created centre will take care of the integration of BIPs into Luxembourg’s society, putting its emphasis on facilitating access to housing. The planned extension of the maximum period of detention for families with children and unaccompanied minors (UAMs) from 72 hours to 7 days precipitated strong reactions from civil society and the public. Luxembourg furthermore followed through on its resettlement and relocation commitments made in 2015, with 167 persons being relocated from Greece and Italy to Luxembourg and with 52 being resettled in the context of the EU-Turkey agreement over the course of 2016. The adaptation of Luxembourg’s legislation in the domain of legal migration also took shape over in 2016 and was broadly debated during the law-making process, while warranting less public attention. With the introduction of one bill, the legislator started the process of transposing Directive 2014/36/EU on seasonal workers and Directive 2014/66/EU on intra-corporate transfers into national law. The same bill furthermore introduced an authorisation of stay for investors, the aspect most commented on by civil society; a mechanism for continuation of activity; detailed the conditions under which a TCN (third country national) corporate officer (mandataire social) can apply for an authorisation of stay, extended the period of validity of the "European Blue Card" residence permit from two to four years, modified dispositions regarding the change of status of students and facilitated family reunification. These developments are to be framed within a wider context of economic diversification, encouragement of entrepreneurship and the repositioning of the financial centre. The reform of the Luxembourgish nationality, another major subject of discussion, was recognised as the best way to counteract Luxembourg’s increasing democratic deficit after the electorate’s refusal to extend legislative voting rights to foreign residents, decided in the referendum of 2015. This reform further proceeded over the course of 2016, reintroduced the perennial language debate in Luxembourg, a larger debate on the role and status of the Luxembourgish language as well as its relation to integration of migrants into Luxembourgish society. In order to increase foreign residents’ participation in the upcoming municipal elections of October 2017, the government launched an awareness campaign encouraging foreign residents to register on the electoral roll, and provided support for organisations wishing to organise complementary actions. The Ministry of National Education and Youth made efforts to find responses to the growing heterogeneity of Luxembourg’s population, aiming to diversify and broaden the post-primary school offer, to develop plurilingual education in nurseries and to develop non-formal education by reforming in-kind benefits, this with the aim of promoting integration and equal opportunity. The transposition of Directive 2013/55/EU on the recognition of professional qualifications was also completed in 2016. The law further amended several national provisions, recast the legislation in the field of recognition of diplomas, combined all applicable provisions in a single legislative text and simplified the procedure for recognition. The debate regarding the return of irregular migrants circled around a number of issues in 2016: the exclusion of Kosovar nationals from the AVRRL programme, the Schengen evaluation and the aforementioned resulting changes to provisions on detention, the debate on the enforcement of the EU-Afghanistan ‘Joint way forward on migration issues’ agreement, as well as the continuation of the elaboration of readmission agreements. Luxembourg’s government took further steps in the fight against trafficking in human beings (THB) over the course of 2016. The Council of Government adopted the National Action Plan on trafficking in human beings, which focuses on the detection and protection of victims, the prosecution and punishment of perpetrators and a policy to combat trafficking. Luxembourg’s strategy on prostitution was presented, consisting of a National Action Plan on prostitution and a bill strengthening the fight against the exploitation of prostitution, procuring and THB. Additionally, the Consultative Commission on Human Rights (Commission Consultative des Droits de l’Homme – C2DH) published its first report on THB, which reviewed the years 2014-2016. In reference to migration and development, Luxembourg continued putting emphasis on vocational training and integration programmes in its indicative cooperation programmes with partner countries. Additionally, the Council of Government approved the bill on the agreement between the Grand Duchy of Luxembourg and the Republic of Cape Verde on the concerted management of migratory flows and solidarity-based development, facilitating the movement of persons and to encourage temporary circular professional migration between Luxembourg and Cape Verde. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 116 (13 UL)