References of "Expert report"
     in
Bookmark and Share    
Full Text
See detailCoronavirus pandemic in the EU – Fundamental Rights Implications in Luxembourg -July2020
Vukovich, Lilla UL; Vysotskaya, Volha UL; Nienaber, Birte UL

Report (2020)

The state of emergency which was declared for three months in Luxembourg came to its end on 24 June 2020. After three weeks of intense legislative work, on 22 June 2020 the parliament adopted two “COVID ... [more ▼]

The state of emergency which was declared for three months in Luxembourg came to its end on 24 June 2020. After three weeks of intense legislative work, on 22 June 2020 the parliament adopted two “COVID-19 laws” to provide a continuous legislative framework addressing the COVID-19 situation after the end of the state of emergency. The first piece of legislation contains measures with respect to individuals. They revolve around the limitation of mass gatherings, the application of protective measures such as wearing face masks or social distancing, and the identification, follow-up and removal of infected and potentially infected people. The second piece of legislation targets measures relating to economic, sporting or cultural activities and welcoming the public. It reinforces the current health restrictions and rules, for example in restaurants, bars, and cafes. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 51 (3 UL)
See detailRapport RIAL 2019
Bernard Gottlieb; Meyers, Christian UL

Report (2020)

Detailed reference viewed: 152 (1 UL)
Full Text
See detailQUALINET White Paper on Definitions of Immersive Media Experience (IMEx)
Perkis, Andrew; Timmerer, Christian; Baraković, Sabina et al

Report (2020)

Detailed reference viewed: 59 (1 UL)
Full Text
See detailVarieties of Democracy (V-DEM) Report "Autocratization Surges - Resistance Grows" (2020)
Danescu, Elena UL

Report (2020)

Main findings 2020. Autocratization – the decline of democratic traits – accelerates in the world: for the first time since 2001, autocracies are in the majority: 92 countries – home to 54% of the global ... [more ▼]

Main findings 2020. Autocratization – the decline of democratic traits – accelerates in the world: for the first time since 2001, autocracies are in the majority: 92 countries – home to 54% of the global population. Almost 35% of the world’s population live in autocratizing nations – 2.6 billion people. EU has its first non-democracy as a member: Hungary is now classed as an electoral authoritarian regime. Major G20 nations and all regions of the world are part of the “third wave of autocratization”: autocratization is affecting Brazil, India, the United States of America, and Turkey, which are major economies with sizeable populations, exercising substantial global military, economic, and political influence. Latin America is back to a level last recorded in the early 1990s while Eastern Europe and Central Asia are at post-Soviet Union lows. India is on the verge of losing its status as a democracy due to the severely shrinking of space for the media, civil society, and the opposition under Prime Minister Modi’s government. Pro-democracy resistance grows from 27% in 2009 to 44% in 2019 amidst the autocratization surge. During 2019, citizens in 29 democracies mobilized against autocratization, such as in Bolivia, Poland, and Malawi. Citizens staged mass protests in 34 autocracies, among them Algeria, Hong Kong, and Sudan. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 106 (0 UL)
Full Text
See detailDraft prEN 1994-1-1: 042020 + comments, Document
Schäfer, Markus UL; Hicks, Stephen; Banfi, Mike et al

Report (2020)

Development of second generation for Eurocode 4, part 1: prEN 1994-1-1: April 2020

Detailed reference viewed: 45 (2 UL)
Full Text
See detailCountry study - Coronavirus COVID-19 outbreak in the EU - Fundamental Rights Implications - Luxembourg
Vysotskaya, Volha UL; Vukovich, Lilla UL; Nienaber, Birte UL

Report (2020)

The report intends to cover the possible impacts of the outbreak of the virus on fundamental rights and freedoms within the Grand Duchy. This includes impacts of quarantine measures, issues concerning ... [more ▼]

The report intends to cover the possible impacts of the outbreak of the virus on fundamental rights and freedoms within the Grand Duchy. This includes impacts of quarantine measures, issues concerning pharmaceutical supplies and testing, situation of employees and families in this specific situation, as well as several other socio-political concerns. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 154 (9 UL)
Full Text
See detailChanging Trends in Gender Equality in Ethiopia
Elezaj, Erëblina; Cebotari, Victor UL; Ramful, Nesha et al

Report (2020)

Detailed reference viewed: 4 (1 UL)
Full Text
See detailGerman Emigration and Remigration Panel Study (GERPS): Methodology and Data Manual of the Baseline Survey (Wave 1)
Ette, Andreas; Decieux, Jean Philippe Pierre UL; Erlinghagen, Marcel et al

Report (2020)

International migration between economically highly developed countries is a central component of global migration flows. Still, surprisingly little is known about the international mobility of the ... [more ▼]

International migration between economically highly developed countries is a central component of global migration flows. Still, surprisingly little is known about the international mobility of the populations of these affluent societies. The aim of the German Emigration and Remigration Panel Study (GERPS) is to collect data to analyse the individual consequences of international migration as well as the consequences for the country of origin. GERPS is based on an origin-based multistage probability sample using the German population registers as a sampling frame. The realised net sample includes more than 11,000 persons who recently moved abroad from Germany and persons returning to Germany after having lived abroad. The study follows a multi-destination country design and allows comparative analyses of migrants and non-migrants who stayed in the country of origin. GERPS is a panel study with at least four waves during a period of at least 24 months. This documentation, however, presents the methodology and the data for the first wave providing the baseline survey. Detailed information is provided to invite external researchers to apply the new data infrastructure to their own research and to disseminate the innovative research design to construct migrant samples. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 62 (0 UL)
Full Text
See detailMetaheuristics for the Online Printing Shop Scheduling Problem - Supplementary Material
Tessaro Lunardi, Willian UL; Birgin, Ernesto G.; Ronconi, Débora P. et al

Report (2020)

This document presents further numerical results of the experiments concerning the classical instances of the flexible job shop scheduling problem, performed in (Lunardi et al., Metaheuristics for the ... [more ▼]

This document presents further numerical results of the experiments concerning the classical instances of the flexible job shop scheduling problem, performed in (Lunardi et al., Metaheuristics for the Online Printing Shop Scheduling Problem, submitted). Additionally, this document gathers the best makespan values (upper bounds and lower bounds) found by state-of-the-art algorithms. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 124 (32 UL)
Full Text
See detailPandemic Simulation and Forecasting of exit strategies:Convergence of Machine Learning and EpidemiologicalModels
Ghamizi, Salah UL; Rwemalika, Renaud UL; Cordy, Maxime UL et al

Report (2020)

The COVID-19 pandemic has created a public health emergency unprecedented in this century. The lack ofaccurate knowledge regarding the outcomes of the virus has made it challenging for policymakers to ... [more ▼]

The COVID-19 pandemic has created a public health emergency unprecedented in this century. The lack ofaccurate knowledge regarding the outcomes of the virus has made it challenging for policymakers to decideon appropriate countermeasures to mitigate its impact on society, in particular the public health and the veryhealthcare system.While the mitigation strategies (including the lockdown) are getting lifted, understanding the current im-pacts of the outbreak remains challenging. This impedes any analysis and scheduling of measures requiredfor the different countries to recover from the pandemic without risking a new outbreak.Therefore, we propose a novel approach to build realistic data-driven pandemic simulation and forecastingmodels to support policymakers. Our models allow the investigation of mitigation/recovery measures andtheir impact. Thereby, they enable appropriate planning of those measures, with the aim to optimize theirsocietal benefits.Our approach relies on a combination of machine learning and classical epidemiological models, circum-venting the respective limitations of these techniques to allow a policy-making based on established knowl-edge, yet driven by factual data, and tailored to each country’s specific context. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 149 (11 UL)
Full Text
See detailWomen’s Empowerment and Child Wellbeing in Ethiopia
Cebotari, Victor UL; Ramful, Nesha; Elezaj, Erëblina et al

Report (2020)

Detailed reference viewed: 6 (0 UL)
Full Text
See detailThe funding of the online press: from its origin to the temporary state subsidies.
Kies, Raphaël UL; Hamdi, Mohamed Amin UL

Report (2019)

Following the objectives of the Media Pluralism Monitor, this section aims to analyse to what extent the introduction of public funding dedicated to the online journalism contributes to reinforce the ... [more ▼]

Following the objectives of the Media Pluralism Monitor, this section aims to analyse to what extent the introduction of public funding dedicated to the online journalism contributes to reinforce the independence, plurality and the quality of the journalistic offer in the country. We will first provide an overview of the issues online media face in Luxembourg before dealing more in detail withthe new national regulation on online media funding. Specifically, we will analyse how it differs from the existing public subsidies for the print media and to what extend online media have benefited from these fundings. This analysis should allow us to evaluate whether the introduction of the subsidies for online journalism positively affects the media concentration, the linguistic and ideological plurality and whether it contributes to improving the quality of the media production. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 53 (0 UL)
See detailRAPPORT TRAVAIL ET COHÉSION SOCIALE − L'ÉTAT SOCIAL ET LE BIEN-ÊTRE DE LA SOCIÉTÉ LUXEMBOURGEOISE
Ametepe, Fofo; Franziskus, Anne; Hartung, Anne UL et al

Report (2019)

Detailed reference viewed: 93 (1 UL)
Full Text
See detailVarieties of Democracy (V-DEM) Annual Report 2019 - "Democracy Facing Global Challenges”
Danescu, Elena UL

Report (2019)

Democracy in decline in more countries than ever before. The 2019 Democracy Report is titled “Democracy Facing Global Challenges”. Democratic declines now affect more countries than ever before. Still ... [more ▼]

Democracy in decline in more countries than ever before. The 2019 Democracy Report is titled “Democracy Facing Global Challenges”. Democratic declines now affect more countries than ever before. Still, most democracies remain resilient despite challenges such as the financial crises and the rampant spread of fake news on social media. Yet, we show that government manipulation of the media, weakening of civil society, the rule of law and even elections is increasing. There are also some positive stories to report from 2018. Central Asia recorded its first ever peaceful handover of power from one democratically elected leader to another in Kyrgyzstan. In Malaysia, an autocrat surprisingly lost in the elections despite electoral manipulation – showing that even in autocratic settings, elections can be a force for change. Pro-democratic movements have also mobilized masses of people across the globe in 2018 and 2019, for instance in Algeria, Armenia, Slovakia, and Sudan. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 59 (0 UL)
Full Text
See detailNational report on the governance of the asylum reception system in Luxembourg
Vianelli, Lorenzo UL; Oesch, Lucas UL; Nienaber, Birte UL

Report (2019)

The national report on the governance of the reception system in Luxembourg is one of the seven country reports that are produced within Work Package 3 of the H2020 project CEASEVAL. The report provides ... [more ▼]

The national report on the governance of the reception system in Luxembourg is one of the seven country reports that are produced within Work Package 3 of the H2020 project CEASEVAL. The report provides an overview of the Luxembourgish reception system. More specifically, it focuses on recent transformations that have affected the system, processes of implementation at the national and local levels, and sources of heterogeneity within the national system. It is based on document analysis as well as on 19 semi-structured interviews with a range of different stakeholders who are directly or indirectly involved in the Luxembourgish reception system. The report first provides some historical background on the reception of asylum seekers in Luxembourg by paying specific attention to the main legislative instruments that shaped the initial design of the national reception system. Then, the main revisions that affected the system in the period 2009-2018 are explored alongside their related decision-making processes. This paves the way for an overview of the formal structure of the Luxembourgish reception system. After the discussion of the formal organisation of reception policies in the country, the report moves on to explore the actual functioning of the reception system by investigating implementation practices at the national and local levels. Finally, some examples of heterogeneity in the current provision of reception are discussed, in an attempt to identify drivers of convergence and divergence in the implementation of reception policies. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 69 (18 UL)
Full Text
See detailIntroduction to Isogeometric Analysis
Bordas, Stéphane UL; Lian, Haojie UL; Ding, Chensen UL

Report (2019)

Detailed reference viewed: 75 (8 UL)
Full Text
See detailReport on political participation of mobile EU citizens: Luxembourg
Scuto, Denis UL; Besch, Sylvain

Report (2019)

Detailed reference viewed: 47 (3 UL)
See detailDigital Education in Luxembourg
Andersen, Katja Natalie UL

Report (2019)

Detailed reference viewed: 28 (2 UL)
Full Text
See detailLebenssituationen und Erfahrungen von lesbischen, schwulen, bisexuellen und trans* Jugendlichen in Luxemburg
Meyers, Christiane UL; Reiners, Diana; Samuel, Robin UL

Report (2019)

Diese von der Universität Luxemburg im Auftrag des Ministeriums für Bildung, Kinder und Jugend durchgeführte Studie ist explorativ angelegt. Mit einem Mixed-Methods-Ansatz wurden einerseits internationale ... [more ▼]

Diese von der Universität Luxemburg im Auftrag des Ministeriums für Bildung, Kinder und Jugend durchgeführte Studie ist explorativ angelegt. Mit einem Mixed-Methods-Ansatz wurden einerseits internationale Datenerhebungen zu Einstellungen der Gesamtbevölkerung und eine LGBT*-Befragung sekundär für Luxemburg ausgewertet. Zweitens wurde der politische und mediale Diskurs mittels einer qualitativen Dokumentenanalyse untersucht. Den dritten Teil bildet eine Analyse von qualitativen Interviews mit acht Jugendlichen (davon zwei trans* Personen), sowie sieben Expert_innen. Durch die geringe Fallzahl sind die vorgestellten Ergebnisse als Einblick in die Lebenssituationen, jedoch nicht als abschließende Gesamtuntersuchung der Situation von lesbischen, schwulen, bisexuellen und trans* Jugendlichen in Luxemburg einzuordnen. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 110 (23 UL)
See detailEducation in Luxembourg
Andersen, Katja Natalie UL

Report (2019)

Overall, reforms and changes in almost all sectors of education were launched over the past six months. In early childhood education, the introduction of the mini crèches made a contribution to a ... [more ▼]

Overall, reforms and changes in almost all sectors of education were launched over the past six months. In early childhood education, the introduction of the mini crèches made a contribution to a comprehensive implementation of early childhood education and care across Luxembourg, assuring at the same a first contact for the youngest with the multilingual education programme. In primary education, the focus was on quality assurance and on the introduction of assistance measures adapted to learning difficulties and the implementation of inclusive schools. In addition, the production of ICT materials for primary school classes was expanded in 2019. Changes in secondary education took place in the sectors of smart technologies trainings and continued the smooth transition from lower to upper secondary education. Furthermore, changes were made in adapting the end of study exams in secondary education according to international standards. Changes in higher education were based on the four-year-plan 2018-2021 of the University of Luxembourg, focusing on quality assurance, advancing learning and teaching, working on the achievement of international excellence in research, and fostering entrepreneurship. Some actions have been taken, however, others are still on its way and need to be implemented. The challenges to be addressed are the maintenance of multilingualism as an asset of education and training systems at all levels, the ability of the Luxembourgish education system to integrate children and youth from different backgrounds, and the ability to overcome inequalities in learning outcomes. The reforms undertaken form the foundation for addressing the challenges in the short and medium term. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 27 (3 UL)
Full Text
See detailLuxembourg
Ligeti, Katalin UL; Giuffrida, Fabio UL

Report (2019)

Detailed reference viewed: 64 (4 UL)
Full Text
See detailIntroduction
Giuffrida, Fabio UL; Ligeti, Katalin UL

Report (2019)

Detailed reference viewed: 47 (3 UL)
See detailWahlen und Weichenstellungen in Lateinamerika 2018. Eine Länderspezifische Analyse.
Harnoncourt, Julia UL; Molden, Berthold; Echivarria, Josefina

Report (2019)

Detailed reference viewed: 7 (0 UL)
Full Text
See detailGender Equality, Women’s Empowerment and Child Wellbeing in Ethiopia
Elezaj, Erëblina; Ramful, Nesha; Cebotari, Victor UL et al

Report (2019)

Detailed reference viewed: 8 (0 UL)
Full Text
See detailA geometrical view of I/O logic
Gabbay, Dov UL; Parent, Xavier UL; van der Torre, Leon UL

Report (2019)

Detailed reference viewed: 48 (7 UL)
Full Text
See detailPolicy Recommendations
Ligeti, Katalin UL; Giuffrida, Fabio UL

Report (2019)

Detailed reference viewed: 58 (5 UL)
Full Text
See detailAttracting and retaining international students in the EU (Country report Luxembourg)
Petry, Ralph UL; Coda, Nicolas UL; Sommarribas, Adolfo UL et al

Report (2018)

Unlike many other EU Member States, the higher education system in Luxembourg is marked by a particular characteristic, namely the fact that the University of Luxembourg is the only public university in ... [more ▼]

Unlike many other EU Member States, the higher education system in Luxembourg is marked by a particular characteristic, namely the fact that the University of Luxembourg is the only public university in the country. Established by law in 2003, the University of Luxembourg is therefore the main actor in the higher education system and hosts the large majority of international students in Luxembourg. In addition to the University of Luxembourg, two more types of institutions complement the higher education system in Luxembourg and are recognised by the Ministry of Higher Education and Research as higher education institutions (hereafter referred to as ‘HEIs’), namely: 1. Secondary educational institutions offering educational programmes that award an advanced technician’s certificate (‘Brevet de technicien supérieur’ – ‘BTS’); 2. Private foreign universities having infrastructures or campus in Luxembourg. In order to be able to award higher education diplomas as well as to host international students, all HEIs are mandatorily required to be approved by the Ministry of Higher Education and Research, with the exception of the University of Luxembourg because it was established by law. The admission conditions for international students to study at a HEI in Luxembourg are twofold: First, the international student must apply and be accepted at an approved HEI or at the University of Luxembourg. Second, once accepted at a HEI, s/he needs to apply for a temporary authorisation of stay, and subsequently, if applicable, a Visa D (valid for 3 months), from his/her country of origin before being authorised to travel to Luxembourg and before being issued a ‘student’ residence permit (valid for minimum 1 year and renewable) in Luxembourg. To conclude, the HEIs in Luxembourg, under the overall auspice of the Ministry of Higher Education and Research, as well as the immigration authorities are the main stakeholders in the context of international students studying in Luxembourg. Luxembourg transposed the Directive (EU) 2016/801 by the Law of 1 August 2018, which amended the amended ‘Immigration Law’ and entered into force on 21 September 2018. In this context, the study highlights in particular the introduction of a new residence permit for ‘private reasons’ in view of seeking employment or establishing a business in Luxembourg. This residence permit was newly introduced by the transposition of the Directive and allows international graduates to remain in the country for a maximum duration of nine months in order to find a job or establish a business in relation to their academic training. Prior to the transposition, international students were only able to change their immigration status to ‘salaried worker’ immediately after their graduation. Moreover, the transposition modified a number of legal dispositions, such as the increase of the maximum amount of hours that students are authorised to work, from 10 hours to 15 hours per week. Furthermore, Bachelor students enrolled in their first year of academic studies as well as students enrolled in a study programme awarding them a ‘BTS’ are no longer excluded from exercising a salaried activity as allowed by law. Lastly, the transposition also facilitates the intra-European mobility of international students who follow a European or multilateral programme that contains mobility measures or a convention between two or more HEIs. The attraction and retention of international students are not considered as a national political priority per se by the Luxembourgish authorities, but have to be perceived in an overall national political priority of attracting “talents” to Luxembourg, i.e. (highly) qualified persons, regardless of their nationality and in the interest of the country and its economy. The stakeholders consulted in the context of this study identified several factors that may have positive effects on the attraction and retention of international students. These include, among others: - the geographical position of Luxembourg with an important financial sector and several European institutions - the multilingual environment of the country as well as the University of Luxembourg - the HEI ranking of the University of Luxembourg - the comparatively low levels of tuition fees, particularly of the national public HEIs - the fact that the level tuition fees is the same for every student, no matter his/her nationality, with the exception of examples from private HEIs Furthermore, the consulted stakeholders identified several examples of good practices in the context of this study, such as for example: - A close and diligent collaboration between all stakeholders, in particular between the Directorate of Immigration, the Ministry of Higher Education and Research and the University of Luxembourg - Quality management of private HEI (mainly through the approval procedure) in view of the best interest of students - Affordable tuitions fees in the higher education system At the same time, the consulted stakeholders have identified several challenges, such as: - the languages of instruction (with a strong emphasis on French and German especially at the Bachelor/‘BTS’ levels) and the primary working languages (French and Luxembourgish) - socio-economic factors, particularly the high costs of living and the challenge of finding affordable housing - authenticity and veracity of transmitted diplomas in the context of a diploma recognition - a challenging procedure related to the entrance exam for international students who hold a high school diploma issued in a country that is not a signatory country of Paris/Lisbon conventions - potential misuse of the ‘student’ residence permit in view of trying to stay in the country instead of succeeding in the studies. In addition to the major legislative change introduced by the transposition of the Directive and the various factors and challenges mentioned above, the study also highlights a number of initiatives, offered in particular by the University of Luxembourg, aiming to support international students after their graduation and to encourage them to establish and/or maintain a connection to the national labour market. The study concludes with a section on bilateral and multilateral cooperation with third countries, both at the level of the Luxembourgish State as well as at the level of HEIs, particularly of the University of Luxembourg. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 76 (12 UL)
Full Text
See detailLesegewohnheiten und bilinguale Lesekompetenzen - Zum Zusammenhang zwischen den Deutsch- und Französisch-Lesekompetenzen von Neuntklässlerinnen und Neuntklässlern und ihren außerschulischen Lesegewohnheiten in Luxemburg
Reichert, Monique UL; Krämer, Charlotte UL; Wollschläger, Rachel UL et al

Report (2018)

Der Beitrag widmet sich der Frage, ob die Unterschiede hinsichtlich der Lesehäufigkeit, der Textsorten, die von Jugendlichen in ihrer Freizeit rezipiert werden, und der Sprache, in der sie bevorzugt lesen ... [more ▼]

Der Beitrag widmet sich der Frage, ob die Unterschiede hinsichtlich der Lesehäufigkeit, der Textsorten, die von Jugendlichen in ihrer Freizeit rezipiert werden, und der Sprache, in der sie bevorzugt lesen, dabei helfen können, ihr Lesekompetenz Niveau im Deutschen und Französischen – jenseits von sozioökonomischem Status, Migrationshintergrund, Muttersprache und Geschlecht – zu erklären. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 78 (4 UL)
Full Text
See detailHabitudes de lecture et compétences de lecture bilingue
Reichert, Monique UL; Krämer, Charlotte UL; Wollschläger, Rachel UL et al

Report (2018)

La problématique soulevée dans cet article concerne les liens entre d’une part, la fréquence de lecture chez les adolescents en fonction des types de textes lus, et de la langue dans laquelle ils lisent ... [more ▼]

La problématique soulevée dans cet article concerne les liens entre d’une part, la fréquence de lecture chez les adolescents en fonction des types de textes lus, et de la langue dans laquelle ils lisent et, dautre part, leur niveau de compétence de lecture en allemand et en français. En outre, il s’agit d’étudier ces liens en fonction des contextes socio-économique et migratoire, de la langue maternelle, et du sexe des adolescents. À cet effet, les données recueillies dans le cadre des Épreuves Standardisées (ÉpStan) de novembre 2016 permettent d’analyser les compétences de lecture en allemand et en français ainsi que les habitudes de lecture extrascolaire de 5177 élèves du grade 9, fréquentant l’Enseignement Secondaire (ES), l’Enseignement Secondaire Technique (EST) ou la branche Préparatoire de l’Enseignement Secondaire Technique (EST-PRE). Les analyses montrent clairement que, indépendamment du sexe, du type d’enseignement et des caractéristiques socioculturelles des adolescents, principalement la tendance à lire des textes narratifs est positivement corrélée aux compétences en lecture. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 61 (10 UL)
Full Text
See detailSchülerkompetenzen im Längsschnitt - Die Entwicklung von Deutsch-Leseverstehen und Mathematik in Luxemburg zwischen der 3. und 9. Klasse
Sonnleitner, Philipp UL; Krämer, Charlotte UL; Gamo, Sylvie UL et al

Report (2018)

it der Erhebung der ÉpStan im Herbst 2016 liegt erstmalig ein Datensatz vor, der einen Einblick in die Entwicklung schulischer Kompetenzen zwischen der 3. Schulstufe (Zyklus 3.1) und der 9. Schulstufe (5e ... [more ▼]

it der Erhebung der ÉpStan im Herbst 2016 liegt erstmalig ein Datensatz vor, der einen Einblick in die Entwicklung schulischer Kompetenzen zwischen der 3. Schulstufe (Zyklus 3.1) und der 9. Schulstufe (5e bzw. 9e) erlaubt. Das vorliegende Kapitel gibt nun einen ersten Einblick in die längsschnittliche Kompetenzentwicklung in den Bereichen Deutsch-Leseverstehen und Mathematik. Hierfür werden die Testergebnisse der untersuchten Schülerkohorte aus den ÉpStan 2010 in der 3. Schulstufe (Zyklus 3.1) den Leistungen in der 9. Schulstufe (5e bzw. 9e) im Jahre 2016 gegenübergestellt. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 69 (6 UL)
Full Text
See detailSchulische Kompetenzen von Erstklässlern und ihre Entwicklung nach zwei Jahren.
Hoffmann, Danielle UL; Hornung, Caroline UL; Gamo, Sylvie UL et al

Report (2018)

Dieses Kapitel stellt die Befunde aus drei Datenerhebungen (2014, 2015, 2016) der ÉpStan im Zyklus 2.1 vor und zeigt welche schulischen Kompetenzen Erstklässler am Anfang ihrer Schullaufbahn aufweisen und ... [more ▼]

Dieses Kapitel stellt die Befunde aus drei Datenerhebungen (2014, 2015, 2016) der ÉpStan im Zyklus 2.1 vor und zeigt welche schulischen Kompetenzen Erstklässler am Anfang ihrer Schullaufbahn aufweisen und wie sich diese über zwei Jahre hinweg entwickeln. Allgemein betrachtet, sind die für den Zyklus 1 festgehaltenen Bildungsstandards in den drei überprüften Kernkompetenzen („Luxemburgisch-Hörverstehen“, „Vorläuferfertigkeiten der Schriftsprache“ und „Mathematik“) erfüllt. In allen drei Kompetenzen erreicht die Mehrheit der Schülerinnen und Schüler zu Beginn des Zyklus 2.1 das Niveau Avancé. Zwei Jahre später, im Zyklus 3.1, fällt die Verteilung der Schülerinnen und Schüler auf die verschiedenen Kompetenzränge negativer aus als im Zyklus 2.1. Hier haben vergleichsweise mehr Kinder das Niveau Socle in allen drei Kernkompetenzen noch nicht erreicht. Unsere Befunde zeigen außerdem, dass verschiedene außerschulische Faktoren (wie z. B. sozioökonomische Situation, Sprachhintergrund) bereits sehr früh im Verlauf der Schullaufbahn einen äußerst starken Einfluss auf die Testergebnisse haben und dass sich dieser Einfluss über die Jahre hinweg verstärkt. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 105 (8 UL)
Full Text
See detailLes compétences scolaires des enfants au début du cycle 2 de l'école fondamentale au Luxembourg et leur développement après deux ans.
Hoffmann, Danielle UL; Hornung, Caroline UL; Gamo, Sylvie UL et al

Report (2018)

Ce chapitre présente les résultats de trois collectes de données (2014, 2015, 2016) des ÉpStan au cycle 2.1 et présente avec quelles compétences scolaires les élèves débutent leur scolarité au début du ... [more ▼]

Ce chapitre présente les résultats de trois collectes de données (2014, 2015, 2016) des ÉpStan au cycle 2.1 et présente avec quelles compétences scolaires les élèves débutent leur scolarité au début du cycle 2.1 et comment celles-ci évoluent sur deux ans. De manière générale, nos résultats montrent que les compétences disciplinaires du cycle 1 portant sur les trois domaines d’apprentissage observés (« compréhension de l’oral en luxembourgeois », « compréhension de l’écrit» et « mathématiques ») sont acquises. Au début du cycle 2.1, la majorité des élèves atteint le Niveau Avancé dans l’ensemble des trois domaines d’apprentissage considérés. Deux ans plus tard, au cycle 3.1, la répartition des élèves sur les différents niveaux de compétence est plus négative qu’au cycle 2.1 et ceci dans la mesure où moins d’enfants ont atteint le Niveau Socle dans l’ensemble des trois domaines d’apprentissage observés. Nos résultats montrent également que, dès le début de la scolarité, différents facteurs extrascolaires (tels que le statut socio-économique et le contexte linguistique) ont une influence extrêmement forte sur les résultats des épreuves et que cette influence augmente au fil des années. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 78 (3 UL)
Full Text
See detailMedia Pluralism Monitor 2017: Luxembourg
Kies, Raphaël UL; Schall, Céline UL

Report (2018)

Detailed reference viewed: 119 (3 UL)
See detailFinTech for Financial Inclusion - Enabling FinTech regulation in emerging & developing countries
Zetzsche, Dirk Andreas UL; Arner, Douglas W.; Buckley, Ross P.

Report (2018)

Access to finance, financial inclusion and financial sector development have long been major policy objectives. A series of initiatives have aimed to increase access to finance and financial inclusion ... [more ▼]

Access to finance, financial inclusion and financial sector development have long been major policy objectives. A series of initiatives have aimed to increase access to finance and financial inclusion, but these have accelerated in the last decade as technological developments combined with strategic policy support show potential for progress beyond anything that has been achieved. The World Bank’s 2017 Global Findex shows that in the last three years, 515 million adults acquired a financial account, and between 2010 and 2017, 1.2 billion people opened an account with a formal financial institution or mobile financial services provider (including mobile money) for the first time. This is impressive progress by any measure, but much remains to be done: as of 2017, 1.7 billion people 16 years or older still did not have access to an account, some 31 percent of the world’s adult population. We argue that to reap the greatest benefits for financial inclusion and maximize the potential of FinTech, a framework that supports infrastructure and an enabling policy and regulatory environment, built on a strong foundation of digital identification and electronic payment systems, will support much broader digital financial transformation. The full potential of FinTech for financial inclusion may be realized with a strategic framework of underlying infrastructure and an enabling policy and regulatory environment to support digital financial transformation. Drawing from experiences in a range of developing, emerging and developed countries, our research suggests that the best approach is staged and progressive, and is focused on four main pillars. 1) The first pillar requires building digital identification and e-KYC systems to simplify access to the financial system. Once these are established for individuals and businesses, they provide a solid foundation not only for finance, but also for the development of the digital economy more broadly. 2) The second pillar requires digital payment infrastructure and open electronic payments systems, as these are the primary way to facilitate digital financial flows in an economy. 3) The third pillar combines the promotion of account opening and access with the electronic provision of government services, particularly for public transfers and payments, so as to scale up the use of digital finance and related services. By supporting access, payments and savings, together these three pillars provide a foundation for digital financial transformation and financial inclusion. 4) The fourth pillar – design of digital financial markets and systems – builds on the first three to support broader access to finance and investment, by underpinning use cases including securities trading, clearing and settlement, and other more sophisticated financial functions. There is a need for regulatory approaches that support and adapt to these four pillars. These regulatory changes are a major journey for any economy, but one that experience increasingly suggests has tremendous potential to transform financial inclusion and support digital economic development. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 263 (0 UL)
Full Text
See detailImpact of visa liberalisation on countries of destination
Sommarribas, Adolfo UL; Nienaber, Birte UL

Report (2018)

Historically, Luxembourg has developed during the last 68 years strong links with the Western Balkan countries. In 1970, a labour agreement was signed between the Grand Duchy of Luxembourg and the Former ... [more ▼]

Historically, Luxembourg has developed during the last 68 years strong links with the Western Balkan countries. In 1970, a labour agreement was signed between the Grand Duchy of Luxembourg and the Former Republic of Yugoslavia to provide for workers to come to work in Luxembourg. This bilateral agreement created a diaspora from the Western Balkans in Luxembourg. Montenegrin nationals represent the largest third-country national population while the Serbians and the Bosnians represents the 3rd and 4th largest nationality groups. There has been a significant number of naturalisations from the West Balkan countries during the last 10 years. This diaspora was a significant “pull factor” during the Yugoslav Wars (1991-1999) and the economic crisis of 2008. This study was unable to verify direct and automatic links between the entering into force of the visa liberalisation agreements with the West Balkans countries and Eastern Partnership countries and an impact for Luxembourg. The large majority of increases, independently if it is legal migration, irregular migration or international protection did not occur during the next year following the entering into force of the agreements. These increases occurred generally during the second year or later. Concerning visa liberalisation agreements with the Western Balkan countries, the first findings are a dramatic increase of international protection applicants from those countries since the agreements came into force. In the international protection field and in the framework of the return decisions, the visa liberalisation agreement had a negative impact generating stress for all the public administrations during 2011 and 2012, which have to deal with international protection and the return mechanism. During 2011, there was a significant increase of applicants from Macedonia and Serbia and in 2012 from Albania and Bosnia-Herzegovina. This situation placed the Luxembourgish authorities under significant stress to deal with this significant inflow of applicants, whose applications were, in the large majority of cases (80%), rejected. However, this situation obliged the Luxembourgish government to take measures in order to deal in a very efficient manner with these inflows of international protection applicants as well as to overhaul the entire international protection procedure. These measures can be divided into two different: procedural measures and implementation measures. The most significant procedural measures are: a) the introduction of the fast track procedure and the implementation of the ultra-expedite procedure; b) the introduction of these countries in the list of safe countries of origin. These measures allow the authorities to deal more efficiently with the massive influx of international protection applicants coming from the region. The implementation measures are: a) No access to social aid for the applicant benefiting from a commitment to cover all expenses by a Luxembourg national, EU citizen or TCN residing in Luxembourg; b) substantial decrease in monthly cash amounts of social aid for adult individuals and households; c) Recruitment and reallocation of staff in the Directorate of Immigration and the Luxembourg Reception and Integration office; d) implementing the Assisted voluntary return Balkans (AVR Balkans) which only covers the return bus ticket; and e) strengthen cooperation with the authorities of the Western Balkan countries. During 2017, there was an increase in the number of international protection applicants from Georgia and Ukraine, even though both countries are included in the list of safe countries of origin. As Luxembourg does not have external borders with the exception of the International Airport, it is not possible to obtain pertinent information concerning the detection of irregular entries in the territory. Nevertheless, there is some evidence that some individuals from these countries have taken advantage of the visa liberalisation agreements to come to work irregularly in Luxembourg, even if it is not possible to quantify the scale of the phenomenon. The findings of this study do not show an increase in the number of applications for authorisation of stay or residence permits (remunerated and study activities), so the EU visa liberalisation agreements did not have any impact in the legal migration field. The increase of application was visible after the second year of entering into force of these agreements but the numbers were not significant in regard with number of applications made by third-country nationals during the same period. However, the short-stay visits (i.e. friends, family, tourism, etc.) seem not only to have been facilitated, but also increased. In some cases, these short-visits have also been used not only to visit family and friends but also to be familiarized with the Luxembourgish society and to explore job opportunities and look for housing. This is probably the only positive impact that the visa liberalization agreements have had. Seen that the visa liberalisation agreements only allow travelling without a visa, but they do not allow working and staying in the country, and based on the data collected there is not possible to establish a link between them and any significant impact with regard to economy and to criminality (especially related to traffic of human beings or smuggling, where the numbers are very low and not directly related in most cases to nationals concerned by this study). [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 67 (8 UL)
Full Text
See detailSupporting Youth in African Countries to Advance Local Economies and Community Health: The SDG Lab on Microfinance for Youth and Clean Water
Leist, Anja UL; Avidar, Ornit; Szelest, Linda et al

Report (2018)

In the sub-Saharan African countries, a large number of young adults enters the labour market each year. Scarcity of regular employment opportunities and the wish to become an entrepreneur lead many young ... [more ▼]

In the sub-Saharan African countries, a large number of young adults enters the labour market each year. Scarcity of regular employment opportunities and the wish to become an entrepreneur lead many young people to start their own business. However, young people are often not able to become regular microloan customers due to both higher risks associated with young age and lack of experience with managing finances. If microfinance products should become accessible to young people, the loans need to be accompanied by non-financial services, i.e., financial advice and mentoring. In order to advance local economies and community health, we see two distinct problems around microfinance products for young adults. First, microfinance products combined with non-financial services are not sustainable, i.e. additional external funds are needed that render these microloan products unprofitable in the long run. Second, if improvements in community water, development, and health are envisaged, then new microfinance products need to be designed to serve the purpose of supporting the SDG goals of clean water and sanitation for all. We used an existing initiative of microfinance for young entrepreneurs and applied the social innovation lab methodology to gather experts in relevant fields. The SDG lab, co-sponsored by Future Earth and Appui au Développement Autonome Microfinance Luxembourg and hosted by the University of Luxembourg, first addressed the problem of sustainability of microfinance products for young entrepreneurs. Second, the SDG lab defined actors, processes, and goals to design microfinance products for young people to support the SDG goals of clean water and sanitation for all. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 62 (4 UL)
Full Text
See detailCriminal procedural laws across the Union Italian report
Allegrezza, Silvia UL

Report (2018)

Detailed reference viewed: 118 (7 UL)
Full Text
See detailCriminal Detention in the EU – Conditions and Monitoring
Greijer, Susanna; Mavrouli, Roila UL

Report (2018)

Detailed reference viewed: 14 (5 UL)
See detailCommunicating Air Pollution Episodes to Vulnerable Populations, a report for Public Health England, DEFRA and Department of Health
Korjonen, Maria Helena UL

Report (2018)

This report was funded by the Department of Health and Department for Environment and Rural Affairs to examine how best communicate air pollution episodes to vulnerable populations. The findings and ... [more ▼]

This report was funded by the Department of Health and Department for Environment and Rural Affairs to examine how best communicate air pollution episodes to vulnerable populations. The findings and recommendations were used in the UK air pollution strategy UK Clean Air Strategy 2019 https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/clean-air-strategy-2019 [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 37 (0 UL)
See detailAntisémitisme au Luxembourg Rapport 2017
Meyers, Christian UL

Report (2018)

Detailed reference viewed: 22 (0 UL)
Full Text
See detailFaithful Semantical Embedding of a Dyadic Deontic Logic in HOL
Benzmüller, Christoph UL; Farjami, Ali UL; Parent, Xavier UL

Report (2018)

A shallow semantical embedding of a dyadic deontic logic by Carmo and Jones in classical higher-order logic is presented. This embedding is proven sound and complete, that is, faithful. The work presented ... [more ▼]

A shallow semantical embedding of a dyadic deontic logic by Carmo and Jones in classical higher-order logic is presented. This embedding is proven sound and complete, that is, faithful. The work presented here provides the theoretical foundation for the implementation and automation of dyadic deontic logic within off-the-shelf higher-order theorem provers and proof assistants. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 65 (5 UL)
See detailAdministration parlementaire, comparaison de la situation en Allemagne, en Belgique, en France, en Suisse et au Luxembourg
Poirier, Philippe UL

Report (2018)

Administration parlementaire, comparaison de la situation en Allemagne, en Belgique, en France, en Suisse et au Luxembourg dans une démarche néo-institutionnaliste

Detailed reference viewed: 60 (1 UL)
See detailParlements et Gouvernance économique européenne: Comparaison de la situation en Allemagne, en Belgique, en France, en Suisse et au Luxembourg, rapport pour la Chambre des Députés du Luxembourg
Poirier, Philippe UL

Report (2018)

Gouvernance économique européenne : Comparaison de la situation en Allemagne, en Belgique, en France, en Suisse et au Luxembourg, rapport pour la Chambre des Députés du Luxembourg, dans une perspective ... [more ▼]

Gouvernance économique européenne : Comparaison de la situation en Allemagne, en Belgique, en France, en Suisse et au Luxembourg, rapport pour la Chambre des Députés du Luxembourg, dans une perspective néo-institutionnaliste [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 35 (0 UL)
Full Text
See detailEvaluation kognitiver Fähigkeiten im luxemburgischen Schulsystem
Muller, Claire UL; Reichel, Yanica UL; Wollschläger, Rachel UL et al

Report (2018)

Das Erlernen von Fremdsprachen hat sich über die Jahre hinweg als zentral für die soziale und kulturelle Entwicklung der Schüler Luxemburgs erwiesen. Die sprachlichen Kurrikula sind entsprechend komplex ... [more ▼]

Das Erlernen von Fremdsprachen hat sich über die Jahre hinweg als zentral für die soziale und kulturelle Entwicklung der Schüler Luxemburgs erwiesen. Die sprachlichen Kurrikula sind entsprechend komplex ausgelegt. Nicht alle Schüler sind dieser Herausforderung gewachsen. Daten aus dem luxemburgischen Schulmonitoring (Épreuves standardisées) zeigen, dass vor allem Grundschüler, die zuhause keine der Landessprachen nutzen, Probleme haben eine richtige Erstsprache zu entwickeln. In diesem Fall ist es nicht weiter verwunderlich, wenn auch andere Kompetenzen nur schleppend ausgebildet werden. Leider wird die Sprachenvielfalt – so sinnvoll und nützlich sie für den Einen auch ist – für so Manche zum Hindernis. Das System produziert unweigerlich Schüler, deren akademische Leistungen unter ihrem Potential bleiben: die sogenannten „Underachiever“. Bevor wir uns allerdings überlegen können wie diesem Problem zu begegnen ist, muss kognitives Potential überhaupt evaluiert werden können. Bislang existieren jedoch keine Tests, die an die Luxemburgische Schülerpopulation angepasst sind. Um diesen Mangel zu beheben, wurde am LUCET der Test of Cognitive Potential (TCP) entwickelt. Der TCP ermöglicht es, kognitive Kompetenzen weitestgehend sprach- und kulturfrei zu erfassen, womit er den Bedürfnissen des luxemburgischen Schulsystems optimal entspricht. Im Verlauf des Kapitels wird der TCP kurz vorgestellt, um folgend erste Beobachtungen hinsichtlich der Problematik des „Underachievements“ anzustellen. Anschließend wird aufgezeigt, wie universal der Nutzen einer systematischen Evaluation von kognitiven Fähigkeiten im schulischen Kontext ist: von der Diagnose spezifischer Lernschwierigkeiten auf Individualniveau bis hin zur Beurteilung der Passung von Lernprogrammen und Fördermaßnahmen auf Systemniveau. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 68 (8 UL)
Full Text
See detailÉvaluation des capacités cognitives dans le système scolaire luxembourgeois
Muller, Claire UL; Reichel, Yanica UL; Wollschläger, Rachel UL et al

Report (2018)

Das Erlernen von Fremdsprachen hat sich über die Jahre hinweg als zentral für die soziale und kulturelle Entwicklung der Schüler Luxemburgs erwiesen. Die sprachlichen Kurrikula sind entsprechend komplex ... [more ▼]

Das Erlernen von Fremdsprachen hat sich über die Jahre hinweg als zentral für die soziale und kulturelle Entwicklung der Schüler Luxemburgs erwiesen. Die sprachlichen Kurrikula sind entsprechend komplex ausgelegt. Nicht alle Schüler sind dieser Herausforderung gewachsen. Daten aus dem luxemburgischen Schulmonitoring (Épreuves standardisées) zeigen, dass vor allem Grundschüler, die zuhause keine der Landessprachen nutzen, Probleme haben eine richtige Erstsprache zu entwickeln. In diesem Fall ist es nicht weiter verwunderlich, wenn auch andere Kompetenzen nur schleppend ausgebildet werden. Leider wird die Sprachenvielfalt – so sinnvoll und nützlich sie für den Einen auch ist – für so Manche zum Hindernis. Das System produziert unweigerlich Schüler, deren akademische Leistungen unter ihrem Potential bleiben: die sogenannten „Underachiever“. Bevor wir uns allerdings überlegen können wie diesem Problem zu begegnen ist, muss kognitives Potential überhaupt evaluiert werden können. Bislang existieren jedoch keine Tests, die an die Luxemburgische Schülerpopulation angepasst sind. Um diesen Mangel zu beheben, wurde am LUCET der Test of Cognitive Potential (TCP) entwickelt. Der TCP ermöglicht es, kognitive Kompetenzen weitestgehend sprach- und kulturfrei zu erfassen, womit er den Bedürfnissen des luxemburgischen Schulsystems optimal entspricht. Im Verlauf des Kapitels wird der TCP kurz vorgestellt, um folgend erste Beobachtungen hinsichtlich der Problematik des „Underachievements“ anzustellen. Anschließend wird aufgezeigt, wie universal der Nutzen einer systematischen Evaluation von kognitiven Fähigkeiten im schulischen Kontext ist: von der Diagnose spezifischer Lernschwierigkeiten auf Individualniveau bis hin zur Beurteilung der Passung von Lernprogrammen und Fördermaßnahmen auf Systemniveau. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 69 (2 UL)
See detailNational Education Reports in Selected European Countries.
Breit, Simone; Gurtner-Reinthaler, Saya; Haugberg, Tonje et al

Report (2018)

Detailed reference viewed: 45 (3 UL)
See detailThe Hague Conference on Private International Law "Judgments Convention"
Cuniberti, Gilles UL; de Miguel Asensio, Miguel; Franzina, Pietro et al

Report (2018)

This study, commissioned by the European Parliament’s Policy Department for Citizens’ Rights and Constitutional Affairs at the request of the JURI Committee, provides an assessment of the ongoing work of ... [more ▼]

This study, commissioned by the European Parliament’s Policy Department for Citizens’ Rights and Constitutional Affairs at the request of the JURI Committee, provides an assessment of the ongoing work of the Hague Conference on the Judgments Convention. The analysis focuses on the November 2017 Draft Convention, its interplay with international and Union instruments in the field, as well as its potential future impact on the regulation of civil and commercial cross-border disputes. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 57 (0 UL)
See detailWalkability in Kraków part of the Health Equity Pilot Project
Korjonen, Maria Helena UL

Report (2018)

This pilot project provided support for knowledge sharing and policy development to reduce health inequalities in the EU, with a focus on the lifestyle determinants such as alcohol consumption, nutrition ... [more ▼]

This pilot project provided support for knowledge sharing and policy development to reduce health inequalities in the EU, with a focus on the lifestyle determinants such as alcohol consumption, nutrition and physical activity, particularly in Member States with the greatest needs. The three-year HEPP project started in January 2016 and will finish in December 2018. The project aimed to reach the above aims by: Updating scientific evidence and reviewing policies and actions Conducting case studies on policies and actions in different Member States Implementing workshops and expert exchange to break barriers to inter-sectoral action on health inequalities Ensuring synergies and support to the health determinants in related Joint Actions Facilitating information exchange and collaboration between groups of experts and stakeholders This case study relates to the sustainable transport policy of Krakow, Poland. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 39 (0 UL)
Full Text
See detailÉvolution en compréhension écrite en allemand et en mathématiques entre la classe de 3e et la classe de 9e
Sonnleitner, Philipp UL; Krämer, Charlotte UL; Gamo, Sylvie UL et al

Report (2018)

Avec les tests ÉpStan de l’automne 2016, une série de données qui donne une vue de l’évolution des compétences scolaires entre le grade 3 (cycle 3.1) et le grade 9 (5e ou 9e) est disponible pour la ... [more ▼]

Avec les tests ÉpStan de l’automne 2016, une série de données qui donne une vue de l’évolution des compétences scolaires entre le grade 3 (cycle 3.1) et le grade 9 (5e ou 9e) est disponible pour la première fois. Le présent chapitre donne de premiers éléments sur l’évolution longitudinale des compétences dans les domaines de la compréhension écrite en allemand et des mathématiques. Pour cela, les résultats des tests des cohortes d’élèves des ÉpStan 2010 du grade 3 (cycle 3.1) seront comparés aux performances au grade 9 (5e ou 9e) au cours de l’année 2016. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 41 (3 UL)
Full Text
See detailMultidimensional child poverty in the Kingdom of Eswatini
Neubourg, Chris De; Cebotari, Victor UL; Ramful, Nesha et al

Report (2018)

Detailed reference viewed: 9 (0 UL)
See detailAmsterdam Healthy Weight Programme (AHWP) part of the Health Equity Pilot Project
Brookes, Chris; Korjonen, Maria Helena UL

Report (2018)

The Amsterdam Healthy Weight Programme was established in 2013 by the Amsterdam Municipality in order to give every child ‘a healthy childhood and future, regardless of their start in life'1 . The overall ... [more ▼]

The Amsterdam Healthy Weight Programme was established in 2013 by the Amsterdam Municipality in order to give every child ‘a healthy childhood and future, regardless of their start in life'1 . The overall objective is to achieve a healthy weight for all children in Amsterdam by 2033. The programme is a universal programme aiming to impact on children across Amsterdam by changing some of the environmental drivers of obesity, but targeted to those neighbourhoods with the highest proportion of overweight and obese children, and those schools with the highest proportion of overweight or obese pupils. The programme is also targeted at those children with the risk factor for obesity of lower income or education parents, and parents of non-Dutch origin. It has both preventative aspects as well as offering support and advice for those children and their parents/carers who are already overweight and obese. From the point of view of addressing health inequalities is interesting both because it has a particular focus on more [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 84 (0 UL)
See detailChild Poverty in Lesotho: Understanding the Extent of Multitple Overlapping Deprivation
Neubourg, Chris De; Cebotari, Victor UL; Ramful, Nesha et al

Report (2018)

Detailed reference viewed: 14 (2 UL)
Full Text
See detailKey drivers of the changing prevalence of child marriage in three countries in South Asia
Dietrich, Stephan; Meysonnat, Aline; Cebotari, Victor UL et al

Report (2018)

Detailed reference viewed: 11 (0 UL)
See detailSozialbericht Esch sur Alzette
Heinz, Andreas UL; Dahmen, Clarissa UL; Ferring, Dieter UL et al

Report (2017)

Detailed reference viewed: 150 (12 UL)
Full Text
See detailL’IDENTIFICATION DES VICTIMES DE LA TRAITE DES ÊTRES HUMAINS LORS DES PROCÉDURES DE PROTECTION INTERNATIONALE ET DE RETOUR FORCÉ
Sommarribas, Adolfo UL; Nienaber, Birte UL

Report (2017)

La note de synthèse présente les principaux résultats de l’étude réalisée en 2013 et actualisée en 2017 par le point de contact luxembourgeois du European Migration Network sur «L’identification des ... [more ▼]

La note de synthèse présente les principaux résultats de l’étude réalisée en 2013 et actualisée en 2017 par le point de contact luxembourgeois du European Migration Network sur «L’identification des victimes de la traite des êtres humains lors des procédures de protection internationale et de retour forcé». [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 88 (13 UL)
Full Text
See detailMigration internationale au Luxembourg - SOPEMI Report 2017
Tüske, Annamaria UL; Sommarribas, Adolfo UL; Nienaber, Birte UL

Report (2017)

Suite au pic constaté en 2015, le nombre de demandes de protection internationale a légèrement diminué en 2016, passant de 2 447 en 2015 à 2 035 en 2016 (soit une baisse de 16,8 %). Malgré le ... [more ▼]

Suite au pic constaté en 2015, le nombre de demandes de protection internationale a légèrement diminué en 2016, passant de 2 447 en 2015 à 2 035 en 2016 (soit une baisse de 16,8 %). Malgré le ralentissement de la tendance, ces chiffres restent supérieurs aux niveaux de 2013-2014. Les ressortissants syriens sont toujours la première nationalité de demandeurs de protection internationale (14,3 %), les ressortissants irakiens chutent à la 4ème place (7,9 %), après les ressortissants albanais (11,2 %) et kosovars (10,2 %). Le Luxembourg continue d’occuper la 4ème place parmi les Etats membres en termes d’accueil de demandeurs de protection internationale par rapport à sa population nationale. Le taux de reconnaissance de protection internationale est passé de 228 (200 statuts de réfugiés et 28 protections subsidiaires) en 2015 à 790 (764 statuts de réfugiés et 26 protections subsidiaires) en 2016. Ces chiffres représentent une augmentation de 246,5 % des décisions positives par rapport à 2015. Le Luxembourg continue de démontrer sa solidarité à l’égard de la relocalisation et de la réinstallation des demandeurs de protection internationale. En 2015, le Luxembourg s’est engagé à relocaliser 557 personnes sur son territoire dans le cadre de la décision du Conseil européen de relocaliser 160 000 demandeurs de protection internationale depuis la Grèce et l’Italie. Dans ce contexte, 197 réfugiés ont été relocalisés fin 2016. Entre janvier 2017 et août 2017, le Luxembourg a relocalisé 186 personnes. Sur le plan de la réinstallation, 52 réfugiés ont été réinstallés depuis la Turquie en 2016, suite à l’engagement du Luxembourg de réinstaller 194 réfugiés en provenance de Turquie dans le cadre de l’accord UE-Turquie du mois de mars 2016. 115 personnes ont été réinstallées entre le 1er janvier 2017 et le 18 août 2017. De nouvelles lois sont entrées en vigueur en 2016/2017 qui concernent la situation migratoire du Luxembourg. Des évolutions politiques d’envergure ont porté sur la mise en œuvre de changements apportés à la législation et aux procédures d’asile, à l’éducation et à la réforme linguistique ainsi que sur des mesures d’intégration révisées en réponse à l’évolution des profils de migration au Luxembourg. L’accent mis sur la migration économique a permis de promouvoir la diversification économique et le repositionnement du centre financier. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 162 (16 UL)
See detailCEN/TC250/SC4.T1: Second Generation of Eurocode 4: Introduction and Amendments to Final Draft October 2017
Banfi, Mike; Mensinger, Martin; Schäfer, Markus UL et al

Report (2017)

Development of second Generation of Eurocode 4, Projectteam CEN/TC250/SC4/T1, Reports for final Draft October 2017

Detailed reference viewed: 166 (8 UL)
Full Text
See detailInternational Migration in Luxembourg - SOPEMI Report 2017
Tüske, Annamaria UL; Sommarribas, Adolfo UL; Nienaber, Birte UL

Report (2017)

While the proportion of Luxembourgish nationals among the resident working population was above 50.3% in 2015, it dropped below 50% in the first quarter of 2017. Some 44% of the working population were ... [more ▼]

While the proportion of Luxembourgish nationals among the resident working population was above 50.3% in 2015, it dropped below 50% in the first quarter of 2017. Some 44% of the working population were EU28 nationals and 6% non-EU nationals. Luxembourg’s economy is reliant on its employment of cross-border workers. In 2016, French nationals maintained and increased their proportion of over 50% of the cross-border working population, reaching 51.4% in Q1 2017, at the expense of both Belgian (24.4%) and German (24.2%) cross-border workers. They mainly work in sectors such as construction, administrative/support service, accommodation/food service, as well as in the financial/insurance sector or professional, scientific and technical activities. Between 2010 and 2017, the number of foreign salaried workers showed the greatest continuous increase in sectors such as professional, scientific and technical activities, administrative and support services, and financial and insurance services. Regarding specific permits, nationals of China (119 permits), India (70 permits) and Montenegro (40 permits) accounted for 31% of all first issues of residence permits for salaried workers. Indian nationals were the single largest nationality group receiving their first issue of EU Blue Cards, with 90 issued during 2016. This was followed by US nationals (58 permits) and Russian nationals (36 permits). After reaching a peak in 2015, the number of applications for international protection slightly decreased in 2016, from 2447 in 2015 to 2035 in 2016 (decrease of 16.8%). Even if the trend slowed down, it remains higher than the levels of 2013-2015. Syrian nationals remain the first nationality of applicants for international protection (14.3%), Iraqi nationals dropping to 4th place (7.9%) after Albanian nationals (11.2%) and Kosovars (10.2%). Luxembourg remains the Member State hosting the 4th highest number of applicants for international protection applicants in relation to the national population. The international protection recognition rate increased from 228 (200 refugee status and 28 subsidiary protection) in 2015 to 790 (764 refugee status and 26 subsidiary protection) in 2016. This represents an increase of 246.5% of positive decisions year-on-year. Luxembourg continues to demonstrate its solidarity in respect of the relocation and resettlement of international protection applicants. In 2015, Luxembourg pledged to relocate 557 individuals to Luxembourg in the framework of the EU Council decision to relocate 160,000 international protection applicants from Greece and Italy. Within this framework, 197 refugees had been relocated by the end of 2016. From January 2017 to 18 August 2017, Luxembourg relocated 186 people. With regards to resettlement, 52 refugees were resettled from Turkey in 2016 as a result of Luxembourg’s pledge to resettle 194 refugees from Turkey in the context of the EU-Turkey agreement of March 2016. 115 people were resettled between 1st January 2017 and 18th August 2017. New pieces of legislation were enacted during 2016/2017 to assist with the specific migration situation in Luxembourg. Major policy developments related to the implementation of changes to asylum legislation and procedures, education and language reform, and revised integration measures in response to changing migration profiles within Luxembourg. A focus on economic migration took place to promote economic diversification, start-ups and the repositioning of the financial centre. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 128 (16 UL)
See detailThe Protection of the Procedural Rights of Persons Concerned by OLAF Administrative Investigations and the Admissibility of OLAF Final Reports as Criminal Evidence
Ligeti, Katalin UL

Report (2017)

This paper provides an analysis of two crucial and interconnected aspects of the current legal framework on the investigations conducted by the European Anti-Fraud Office (OLAF): the procedural safeguards ... [more ▼]

This paper provides an analysis of two crucial and interconnected aspects of the current legal framework on the investigations conducted by the European Anti-Fraud Office (OLAF): the procedural safeguards for the individuals subject to the administrative investigations conducted by OLAF and the admissibility in evidence of OLAF Final Reports in national criminal proceedings. The state of the art and its shortcomings are analysed in the double perspective of the coherent protection of the EU’s financial interests and of the respect of fundamental rights provided by the EU Charter of Fundamental Rights. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 131 (17 UL)
See detailIncompatibilités, disciplines & déontologies parlementaires, comparaison de la situation en Allemagne, en Belgique, en France, en Suisse et au Luxembourg
Poirier, Philippe UL

Report (2017)

Incompatibilités, disciplines & déontologies parlementaires, comparaison de la situation en Allemagne, en Belgique, en France, en Suisse et au Luxembourg dans une démarche néo-institutionnaliste

Detailed reference viewed: 57 (1 UL)
See detailCEN/TC250/SC4.T1: Second Generation of Eurocode 4: Introduction and Amendments to Second Draft April 2017
Banfi, Mike; Mensinger, Martin; Schäfer, Markus UL et al

Report (2017)

Development of second Generation of Eurocode 4, Projectteam CEN/TC250/SC4/T1, Reports for second Draft April 2017

Detailed reference viewed: 36 (3 UL)
Full Text
See detailNew Luxembourg Nationality Law came into force on 1 April
Scuto, Denis UL

Report (2017)

Detailed reference viewed: 71 (6 UL)
Full Text
See detailBackground Report to EN 1994 - Plastic moment resistance of composite beams
Schäfer, Markus UL; Banfi, Mike

Report (2017)

As part of the development of the second generation of Eurocodes and harmonization of the different European Codes, some clarifications deal with the design value of concrete compression strength and the ... [more ▼]

As part of the development of the second generation of Eurocodes and harmonization of the different European Codes, some clarifications deal with the design value of concrete compression strength and the bending design of steel-composite sections. The following background document describes the issues in design and confusions between Eurocode 2 for the design of concrete structures and Eurocode 4 for the design of composite structures in steel and concrete. The first part is concentrated on the background information and the accentuation of limits for plastic bending design. While the second part represents the results of multiple comparisons between plastic and strain limited design leading to a new design approach. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 58 (3 UL)
Full Text
See detailEconomic Aspects of Old Age Exclusion: A Scoping Review
Myck, Michal; Ogg, Jim; Aigner-Walder, Birgit et al

Report (2017)

Detailed reference viewed: 39 (1 UL)
See detailLes Groupes parlementaires, comparaison de la situation en Allemagne, en Belgique, en France, en Suisse et au Luxembourg, rapport pour la Chambre des Députés du Luxembourg
Poirier, Philippe UL

Report (2017)

Les Groupes parlementaires, comparaison de la situation en Allemagne, en Belgique, en France, en Suisse et au Luxembourg, rapport pour la Chambre des Députés du Luxembourg dans une perspective néo ... [more ▼]

Les Groupes parlementaires, comparaison de la situation en Allemagne, en Belgique, en France, en Suisse et au Luxembourg, rapport pour la Chambre des Députés du Luxembourg dans une perspective néo-institutionnaliste [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 46 (1 UL)
Full Text
See detailCorruption prevention in respect of Members of Parliament, Judges and Prosecutors- Evaluation Report Switzerland
Poirier, Philippe UL

Report (2017)

In a report published, the Council of Europe anti-corruption body (GRECO) highlights the specificities of Switzerland’s institutions which enjoy considerable public confidence. It underlines, however ... [more ▼]

In a report published, the Council of Europe anti-corruption body (GRECO) highlights the specificities of Switzerland’s institutions which enjoy considerable public confidence. It underlines, however, that the very organisation of the system allows subtle pressure to be exerted on politicians and the judiciary (See also the French, German and Italian versions of the report). More specifically, GRECO deems it necessary to increase members of parliament’s (MPs) awareness regarding issues of ethics and conflicts of interest. To this end, it recommends adopting a code, announcing publicly MPs’ conflicts of interest as part of the parliamentary procedure and developing the system for declaring relevant interests. These measures need to be accompanied by a reinforced monitoring of MPs’ compliance with their obligations. While recognising the legitimacy of the principle of the election of judges of the federal courts by the Federal Assembly, GRECO calls for improvements to better ensure the quality and objectivity of the recruitment of these judges. It also underlines the importance of severing ties with the political powers after their election, notably by doing away with the practice of judges paying part of their salary to “their” party. Rules of professional ethics applicable to judges also need to be developed and a transparent disciplinary system put in place. The Office of the Attorney General of the Confederation, which enjoys a large degree of independence, also needs to develop rules of professional ethics applicable to its members and to provide greater transparency in disciplinary matters. The implementation of the 12 recommendations addressed to Switzerland will be assessed by GRECO in the second half of 2018 through its compliance procedure. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 98 (3 UL)
See detailLes Commissions Parlementaire, comparaison de la situation en Allemagne, en Belgique, en France, en Suisse et au Luxembourg, rapport pour la Chambre des Députés du Luxembourg
Poirier, Philippe UL

Report (2017)

Les Commissions Parlementaire, comparaison de la situation en Allemagne, en Belgique, en France, en Suisse et au Luxembourg, rapport pour la Chambre des Députés du Luxembourg dans une perspective néo ... [more ▼]

Les Commissions Parlementaire, comparaison de la situation en Allemagne, en Belgique, en France, en Suisse et au Luxembourg, rapport pour la Chambre des Députés du Luxembourg dans une perspective néo-institutionnaliste [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 28 (0 UL)