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See detailDesigning EMI lecturer training programmes: what and how
Deroey, Katrien UL

Scientific Conference (2021, April 08)

This workshop will provide insights into designing and delivering English Medium Instruction (EMI) lecturer training. Although universities have been slow to organize EMI lecturer support, an increasing ... [more ▼]

This workshop will provide insights into designing and delivering English Medium Instruction (EMI) lecturer training. Although universities have been slow to organize EMI lecturer support, an increasing awareness of the challenges faced by EMI lecturers and their students now appears to be boosting the demand for EMI lecturer training and support initiatives. Consequently, EAP practitioners can increasingly expect requests to design and deliver such programmes. However, the efficient design and delivery of EMI lecturing training and support is a complex challenge. First, the EMI context is very varied and initiatives should be adapted to the local cultural, educational, linguistic and institutional contexts (Herington, 2020; Martinez & Fernandes, 2020; Tuomainen, 2018). Second, most literature highlights the need for language, pedagogical and intercultural components (e.g. Fortanet Gómez, 2020). Third, we need to be sensitive to lecturers’ attitudes towards EMI and EMI training (Tsui, 2018). Fourth, there are practical considerations such as the timely provision of support (Guarda & Helm, 2017), promoting participation, facilitating learning transfer to lectures, and optimizing the support in view of what are often heterogeneous participant groups in terms of English proficiency, (EMI) lecturing experience and discipline (Ball & Lindsay, 2013). Finally, the design of these programmes typically needs to happen with very limited institutional resources, few (if any) published materials and relatively little published research on lecture discourse and EMI lecturer training. The workshop will start with an overview of published training initiatives with their reported successes and challenges (Deroey, 2021). Next, participants will work in small groups, brainstorming ideas for an EMI support programme based on a brief we have recently received at the multilingual University of Luxembourg Language Centre. Finally, these proposals will be discussed in the whole group and key ideas summarized to consolidate the insights gained. Ball, P., & Lindsay, D. (2013). Language demands and support for English-medium instruction in tertiary education. Learning from a specific context In A. Doiz, D. Lasagabaster, & J. M. Sierra (Eds.), English-medium instruction at universities: Global challenges (pp. 44-61). Bristol: Multilingual Matters. -Deroey, K. L. B. (2021). Lecturer training for English Medium Instruction: what and how? In B. D. Bond, A. & M. Evans (Ed.), Innovation, exploration and transformation. Proceedings of the 2019 BALEAP Conference. Reading: Garnet. -Fortanet Gómez, I. (2020). The dimensions of EMI in the international classroom: training teachers for the future university. In M. Del Mar Sánchez-Pérez (Ed.), Teacher training for English-medium instruction in higher education (pp. 1-20). Hershey: IGI Global. -Guarda, M., & Helm, F. (2017). A survey of lecturers’ needs and feedback on EMI training. In K. Ackerley, M. Guarda, & F. Helm (Eds.), Sharing perspectives on English-medium instruction (pp. 167-194). Bern: Peter Lang. -Herington, R. (2020). Observation as a tool to facilitate the professional development of teaching faculty involved in English as a Medium of Instruction: trainer and trainee perspectives. In M. L. Carrió-Pasto (Ed.), Internationalising Learning in Higher Education (pp. 65-82). Hershey: IGI Global. -Martinez, R., & Fernandes, K. (2020). Development of a teacher training course for English medium instruction for higher education professors in Brazil. In M. Del Mar Sánchez-Pérez (Ed.), Teacher Training for English-Medium Instruction in Higher Education (pp. 125-152). Hershey: IGI Global. -Tuomainen, S. (2018). Supporting non-native university lecturers with English-medium instruction. Journal of Applied Research in Higher Education. 10(3), 230-242. -Tsui, C. (2018). Teacher efficacy: a case study of faculty beliefs in an English-medium instruction teacher training program. Taiwan Journal of TESOL, 15(1), 101-128. [less ▲]

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See detailDesigning and managing an online, personalised research writing course for postgraduates
Deroey, Katrien UL; Skipp, Jennifer

Scientific Conference (2021, April 08)

This paper describes and evaluates an online research article writing course at the University of Luxembourg. Participants were self-referred PhD students from different disciplines. The aim of the ten ... [more ▼]

This paper describes and evaluates an online research article writing course at the University of Luxembourg. Participants were self-referred PhD students from different disciplines. The aim of the ten-week course is to improve insight into the structural, stylistic and rhetorical features of research articles as well as the writing and publication process. It also provides tools for students to develop their own writing. We will situate our course rationale and design within the literature, then compare these to both the reality of managing and delivering the course online as well as participants’ feedback as reflected in 30 surveys. We will focus on the following results: • The practicability of including multiple pedagogical elements in an online course was challenging. We wanted to integrate both independent and collaborative work, production and reflection. However, results of the surveys and our own experience show that the multiplicity of elements was often seen as complex and difficult to manage and multiple submission deadlines problematic. • Students favoured working alone over working together and uptake of writing groups (Aitchison, 2009) was poor. Multi-disciplinary peer groups were, however, positively reviewed (cf. Hyland, 2012). • The flexibility of the online environment was seen as positive, yet many reported problems finding time to write. However, participants did see the benefit in having to write regularly. Tools of reflection did not score highly. • The personalisation of learning input scored highly in the survey, but this was time-consuming to implement. Whilst instructor-student consultations were offered to further personalise feedback, these had a low uptake (8/30). • We wanted to create a course which included guidance on the writing and publication process (Starfield & Paltridge, 2016) as well as increased genre awareness (Swales, 1990) to prepare students for publication. However, tasks on language and structure were rated more useful by more students than this content. • More participants commented on the benefit of working through their language issues in live sessions over learning how to address language issues through the corpus-tools that were integrated into the course (Charles, 2018). Through sharing this information, we hope to generate a discussion with the audience about ways to optimise online writing courses and manage some of the problems associated with online delivery. Aitchison, C. (2009). Writing groups for doctoral education. Studies in Higher Education, 34(8), 905-916. Charles, M. (2018) Corpus-assisted editing for doctoral students: More than just concordancing. Journal of English for Academic Purposes, 36, 15-26. Charles, M. (2018). Using do-it-yourself-corpora in EAP: A tailor-made resource for teachers and students. Teaching English for Specific and Academic Purposes, 6(2), 217-224. Hyland, K. (2012). Disciplinary Identities: Individuality and Community in Academic Discourse. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. Nesi, H. & Gardener, S. (2012). Genres across the disciplines: Student writing in higher education. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. Paltridge, B., & Starfield, S. (2016). Getting published in academic journals: Navigating the publication process. Ann Arbor: University of Michigan Press. Swales, J. (1990). Genre analysis: English in academic and research settings. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. [less ▲]

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See detailRegional Development Banks and the promotion of Public-Private Partnerships: the EIB as a case study
Howarth, David UL; Liebe, Moritz

in Clifton, Judith; Diaz Fuentes, Daniel; Howarth, David (Eds.) Regional Banks in the World Economy (2021)

Most Regional Development Banks in the world have engaged in the increased promotion and use of Public Private Partnerships (PPPs). To explain this rapid and ubiquitous spread of Public Private ... [more ▼]

Most Regional Development Banks in the world have engaged in the increased promotion and use of Public Private Partnerships (PPPs). To explain this rapid and ubiquitous spread of Public Private Partnership promotion and use, this chapter argues that Regional Development Banks can be seen to have acted as agents engaged in slippage. Most—if not all—of their shareholding national governments and loan recipient countries had limited or no prior experience with and knowledge of PPP financing. This activism on the part of Regional Development Banks can also be seen in both Multilateral Development Bank and National Development Bank promotion of PPPs and reinforces wider claims in the literature. More generally, Gavin and Rodrik (1995) argue that International Financial Institutions (IFIs) bolster their long-acquired skills in technical and information expertise in order to remain relevant—a claim that this chapter explores with regard to PPPs in particular. The promotion of PPPs should also be seen in terms of Regional Development Banks operating as agents to move beyond the correction of market failure towards the creation and/or shaping of markets through a particular financing mechanism and with specific market actors (Mazzucato and Penna 2016: 305). [less ▲]

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See detailTransition from traditional to hybrid to online courses for pre-service elementary school teachers at the University of Luxembourg: STEAM integrated approach in the project MathEduc @ BScE
Kreis, Yves UL; Haas, Ben

Scientific Conference (2021, April 07)

During the past year, technology has started enabling new forms of teaching and learning in higher education in Luxemburg. Thus, to be able to work more closely with elementary school pre-service teachers ... [more ▼]

During the past year, technology has started enabling new forms of teaching and learning in higher education in Luxemburg. Thus, to be able to work more closely with elementary school pre-service teachers, we shifted our mathematics education course during the past years to flipped classroom approaches and worked with synchronous and asynchronous teaching on- and off-campus modes. Furthermore, due to the restrictions of the COVID-19 pandemic, we decided to shift our teaching to entirely online flipped classroom approaches together with outdoor mathematical trails with STEAM integrated assessments. This final shift to a fully online flipped classroom, with self-paced, student-centred teachings and learnings, showed strong positive effects on pre-service elementary school teachers in mathematics teaching. In this presentation, we will outline results of this transition period and describe results from different studies. [less ▲]

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See detailTaming Android App Crashes
Kong, Pingfan UL

Doctoral thesis (2021)

App crashes constitute an important deterrence for app adoption in the android ecosystem. Yet, Android app developers are challenged by the limitation of test automation tools to ensure that released apps ... [more ▼]

App crashes constitute an important deterrence for app adoption in the android ecosystem. Yet, Android app developers are challenged by the limitation of test automation tools to ensure that released apps are free from crashes. In recent years, researchers have proposed various automation approaches in the literature. Unfortunately, the practical value of these approaches have not yet been confirmed by practitioner adoption. Furthermore, existing approaches target a variety of test needs which are relevant to different sets of problems, without being specific to app crashes. Resolving app crashes implies a chain of actions starting with their reproduction, followed by the associated fault localization, before any repair can be attempted. Each action however, is challenged by the specificity of Android. In particular, some specific mechanisms (e.g., callback methods, multiple entry points, etc.) of Android apps require Android-tailored crash-inducing bug locators. Therefore, to tame Android app crashes, practitioners are in need of automation tools that are adapted to the challenges that they pose. In this respect, a number of building blocks must be designed to deliver a comprehensive toolbox. First, the community lacks well-defined, large-scale datasets of real-world app crashes that are reproducible to enable the inference of valuable insights, and facilitate experimental validations of literature approaches. Second, although bug localization from crash information is relatively mature in the realm of Java, state-of-the-art techniques are generally ineffective for Android apps due to the specificity of the Android system. Third, given the recurrence of crashes and the substantial burden that they incur for practitioners to resolve them, there is a need for methods and techniques to accelerate fixing, for example, towards implementing Automated Program Repair (APR). Finally, the above chain of actions is for curative purposes. Indeed, this "reproduction, localization, and repair" chain aims at correcting bugs in released apps. Preventive approaches, i.e., approaches that help developers to reduce the likelihood of releasing crashing apps, are still absent. In the Android ecosystem, developers are challenged by the lack of detailed documentation about the complex Android framework API they use to develop their apps. For example, developers need support for precisely identifying which exceptions may be triggered by APIs. Such support can further alleviate the challenge related to the fact that the condition under which APIs are triggered are often not documented. In this context, the present dissertation aims to tame Android crashes by contributing to the following four building blocks: Systematic Literature Review on automated app testing approaches: We aim at providing a clear overview of the state-of-the-art works around the topic of Android app testing, in an attempt to highlight the main trends, pinpoint the main methodologies applied and enumerate the challenges faced by the Android testing approaches as well as the directions where the community effort is still needed. To this end, we conduct a Systematic Literature Review (SLR) during which we eventually identified 103 relevant research papers published in leading conferences and journals until 2016. Our thorough examination of the relevant literature has led to several findings and highlighted the challenges that Android testing researchers should strive to address in the future. After that, we further propose a few concrete research directions where testing approaches are needed to solve recurrent issues in app updates, continuous increases of app sizes, as well as the Android ecosystem fragmentation. Locating Android app crash-inducing bugs: We perform an empirical study on 500 framework-specific crashes from an open benchmark. This study reveals that 37 percent of the crash types are related to bugs that are outside the crash stack traces. Moreover, Android programs are a mixture of code and extra-code artifacts such as the Manifest file. The fact that any artifact can lead to failures in the app execution creates the need to position the localization target beyond the code realm. We propose ANCHOR, a two-phase suspicious bug location suggestion tool. ANCHOR specializes in finding crash-inducing bugs outside the stack trace. ANCHOR is lightweight and source code independent since it only requires the crash message and the apk file to locate the fault. Experimental results, collected via cross-validation and in-the-wild dataset evaluation, show that ANCHOR is effective in locating Android framework-specific crashing faults. Mining Android app crash fix templates: We propose a scalable approach, CraftDroid, to mine crash fixes by leveraging a set of 28 thousand carefully reconstructed app lineages from app markets, without the need for the app source code or issue reports. We develop a replicative testing approach that locates fixes among app versions which output different runtime logs with the exact same test inputs. Overall, we have mined 104 relevant crash fixes, further abstracted 17 fine-grained fix templates that are demonstrated to be effective for patching crashed apks. Finally, we release ReCBench, a benchmark consisting of 200 crashed apks and the crash replication scripts, which the community can explore for evaluating generated crash-inducing bug patches. Documenting framework APIs' unchecked exceptions: We propose Afuera, an automated tool that profiles Android framework APIs and provides information on when they can potentially trigger unchecked exceptions. Afuera relies on a static-analysis approach and a dedicated algorithm to examine the entire Android framework. With Afuera, we confirmed that 26739 unique unchecked exception instances may be triggered by invoking 5467 (24%) Android framework APIs. Afuera further analyzes the Android framework to inform about which parameter(s) of an API method can potentially be the cause of the triggering of an unchecked exception. To that end, Afuera relies on fully automated instrumentation and taint analysis techniques. Afuera is run to analyze 50 randomly sampled APIs to demonstrate its effectiveness.Evaluation results suggest that Afuera has perfect true positive rate. However, Afuera is affected by false negatives due to the limitation of state-of-the-art taint analysis techniques. 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See detailExtensional Higher-Order Paramodulation in Leo-III
Steen, Alexander UL; Benzmüller, Christoph UL

in Journal of Automated Reasoning (2021)

Leo-III is an automated theorem prover for extensional type theory with Henkin semantics and choice. Reasoning with primitive equality is enabled by adapting paramodulation-based proof search to higher ... [more ▼]

Leo-III is an automated theorem prover for extensional type theory with Henkin semantics and choice. Reasoning with primitive equality is enabled by adapting paramodulation-based proof search to higher-order logic. The prover may cooperate with multiple external specialist reasoning systems such as first-order provers and SMT solvers. Leo-III is compatible with the TPTP/TSTP framework for input formats, reporting results and proofs, and standardized communication between reasoning systems, enabling e.g. proof reconstruction from within proof assistants such as Isabelle/HOL. Leo-III supports reasoning in polymorphic first-order and higher-order logic, in all normal quantified modal logics, as well as in different deontic logics. Its development had initiated the ongoing extension of the TPTP infrastructure to reasoning within non-classical logics. [less ▲]

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See detailDigital history and the politics of digitization
Zaagsma, Gerben UL

Scientific Conference (2021, March 10)

This paper addresses the question of the politics of (cultural heritage) digitisation and its consequences for historical research. To put it simply, it discusses the question of why, where and how we can ... [more ▼]

This paper addresses the question of the politics of (cultural heritage) digitisation and its consequences for historical research. To put it simply, it discusses the question of why, where and how we can access what we can access. The online documentary record affects historical research and we need to understand how and in what ways our online evidentiary basis is constituted and might affect our research. [less ▲]

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See detailEnd-to-end Precoding Validation over a Live GEO Satellite Forward Link
Krivochiza, Jevgenij UL; Merlano Duncan, Juan Carlos UL; Querol, Jorge UL et al

in IEEE Access (2021)

In this paper we demonstrate end-to-end precoded multi-user multiple-input singleoutput (MU-MISO) communications over a live GEO satellite link. Precoded communications enable full frequency reuse (FFR ... [more ▼]

In this paper we demonstrate end-to-end precoded multi-user multiple-input singleoutput (MU-MISO) communications over a live GEO satellite link. Precoded communications enable full frequency reuse (FFR) schemes in satellite communications (SATCOM) to achieve broader service availability and higher spectrum efficiency than with the conventional four-color (4CR) and twocolor (2CR) reuse approaches. In this scope, we develop an over-the-air test-bed for end-to-end precoding validations.We use an actual multi-beam satellite to transmit and receive precoded signals using the DVB-S2X standard based gateway and user terminals. The developed system is capable of end-to-end real-time communications over the satellite link including channel measurements and precompensation. It is shown, that by successfully canceling inter-user interference in the actual satellite FFR link precoding brings gains in terms of enhanced SINR and increased system goodput. [less ▲]

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See detailExploring the History of Digital History
Zaagsma, Gerben UL

Scientific Conference (2021, March 01)

This short paper will present the first results, and outline my new project which investigates the early trajectories of history and computing and focuses on the networks of computing historians in the ... [more ▼]

This short paper will present the first results, and outline my new project which investigates the early trajectories of history and computing and focuses on the networks of computing historians in the pre-PC and early PC period. [less ▲]

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See detailLa réforme du droit belge des sociétés, un exemple à suivre pour le Luxembourg ?
Corbisier, Isabelle UL; Prüm, André UL

Book published by Larcier (2021)

Le nouveau Code des sociétés et des associations, introduit par le législateur belge en 2019 et applicable aux sociétés existantes depuis le 1er janvier 2020, est-il un exemple qui ferait sens au ... [more ▼]

Le nouveau Code des sociétés et des associations, introduit par le législateur belge en 2019 et applicable aux sociétés existantes depuis le 1er janvier 2020, est-il un exemple qui ferait sens au Luxembourg ? De par ses évolutions marquantes, ce nouveau code a rendu le droit belge des sociétés davantage fonctionnel, flexible et attractif. L’ouvrage rend compte des grands changements intervenus et les met en perspective avec le droit luxembourgeois. Y sont notamment abordées les questions relatives à la notion d’« entreprise » et ses conséquences, à l’abandon du siège réel comme critère de rattachement, au nouveau statut de la société à responsabilité limitée, aux nouvelles règles de gouvernance et à la libéralisation du régime des titres. L’ouvrage rassemble les contributions de : Alexia Autenne, Roman Aydogdu, Isabelle Corbisier, Henri Culot, Pierre-Alexandre Degehet, Michel de Wolf, Katia Gauzès, Philippe Hoss,Yann Paclot, Yann Payen, Denis Philippe, André Prüm, Pit Reckinger, Pierre Schleimer, Laurent Schummer, Jean-Paul Spang et Nicolas [less ▲]

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See detailPrimary and Secondary Impacts of COVID-19 on Children and Women in Ghana
Karpati, Julia; Elezaj, Erëblina; Safojan, Romina et al

Report (2020)

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See detailGeoGebraPrim - GeoGebra in der Grundschule
Kreis, Yves UL; Dording, Carole UL; Keller, Ulrich UL

in Lindmeier, Anke M.; Ufer, Stefan (Eds.) Beiträge zum Mathematikunterricht 2010 (2010)

In diesem Artikel wird das von der Universität Luxemburg finanzierte For-schungsprojekt GeoGebraPrim – GeoGebra in der Grundschule vorgestellt. Wir geben zuerst einen kurzen Überblick über das ... [more ▼]

In diesem Artikel wird das von der Universität Luxemburg finanzierte For-schungsprojekt GeoGebraPrim – GeoGebra in der Grundschule vorgestellt. Wir geben zuerst einen kurzen Überblick über das Forschungsprojekt, er-klären anschließend die angewandten pädagogischen und technologischen Konzepte und stellen schlussendlich einige Resultate vor. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 29 (2 UL)