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See detailCharacterizing and Utilizing the Interplay between Quantum Technologies and Non-Terrestrial Networks
Al-Hraishawi, Hayder UL; Junaid, ur Rehman; Mohsen, Razavi et al

in IEEE Transactions on Quantum Engineering (2023)

Quantum technologies have been widely recognized as one of the milestones towards the ongoing digital transformation, which will also trigger new disruptive innovations. Quantum technologies encompassing ... [more ▼]

Quantum technologies have been widely recognized as one of the milestones towards the ongoing digital transformation, which will also trigger new disruptive innovations. Quantum technologies encompassing quantum computing, communications, and sensing offer an interesting set of advantages such as unconditional security and ultra-fast computing capabilities. However, deploying quantum services at a global scale requires circumventing the limitations due to the geographical boundaries and terrestrial obstacles, which can be adequately addressed by considering non-terrestrial networks (NTNs). In the recent few years, establishing multi-layer NTNs has been extensively studied to integrate space-airborne-terrestrial communications systems, particularly by the international standardization organizations such as the third-generation partnership project (3GPP) and the international telecommunication union (ITU), in order to support future wireless ecosystems. Indeed, amalgamating quantum technologies and NTNs will scale up the quantum communications ranges and provide unprecedented levels of security and processing solutions that are safer and faster than the traditional offerings. This paper provides some insights into the interplay between the evolving NTN architectures and quantum technologies with a particular focus on the integration challenges and their potential solutions for enhancing the quantum-NTN interoperability among various space-air-ground communications nodes. The emphasis is on how the quantum technologies can benefit from satellites and aerial platforms as an integrated network and vice versa. Moreover, a set of future research directions and new opportunities are identified. [less ▲]

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See detailGrenzen und ihre Multivalenzen in einem flüchtigen Europa
Wille, Christian UL; Weber, Florian; Fellner, Astrid M.

in Borders in Perspective (2023), (8), 7-15

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See detailDecision support system for blockchain (DLT) platform selection based on ITU recommendations: A systematic literature review approach
Kubler, Sylvain UL; Renard, Matthieu; Ghatpande, Sankalp UL et al

in Expert systems with applications (2023), 211

Blockchain technologies, also known as Distributed Ledger Technologies (DLT), are increasingly being explored in many applications, especially in the presence of (potential) dis-/mis-/un-trust among ... [more ▼]

Blockchain technologies, also known as Distributed Ledger Technologies (DLT), are increasingly being explored in many applications, especially in the presence of (potential) dis-/mis-/un-trust among organizations and individuals. Today, there exists a plethora of DLT platforms on the market, which makes it challenging for system designers to decide what platform they should adopt and implement. Although a few DLT comparison frameworks have been proposed in the literature, they often fail in covering all performance and functional aspects, adding that they too rarely build upon standardized criteria and recommendations. Given this state of affairs, the present paper considers a recent and exhaustive set of assessment criteria recommended by the ITU (International Telecommunication Union). Those criteria (about fifty) are nonetheless mostly defined in a textual form, which may pose interpretation problems during the implementation process. To avoid this, a systematic literature review regarding each ITU criterion is conducted with a twofold objective: (i) to understand to what extent a given criterion is considered/evaluated by the literature; (ii) to come up with ‘formal’ metric definition (i.e., on a mathematical or experimental ground) based, whenever possible, on the current literature. Following this formalization stage, a decision support tool called CREDO-DLT, which stands for “multiCRiteria-basEd ranking Of Distributed Ledger Technology platforms”, is developed using AHP and TOPSIS, which is publicly made available to help decision-maker to select the most suitable DLT platform alternative (i.e., that best suits their needs and requirements). A use case scenario in the context of energy communities is proposed to show the practicality of CREDO-DLT. •Blockchain (DLT) standardization initiatives are reviewed.•To what extent ITU’s DLT assessment criteria are covered in literature is studied.•A mathematical formalizations of the ITU recommendations are proposed.•A decision support tool (CREDO-DLT) is designed for DLT platform selection.•An energy community use case is developed to show the practicality of CREDO-DLT. [less ▲]

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See detailA comprehensive survey of English medium instruction lecturer training programmes: content, delivery, ways forward
Deroey, Katrien UL

in Journal of English for Academic Purposes (2023)

This paper surveys English medium instruction (EMI) lecturer training worldwide in order to inform decisions by practitioners tasked with its design and delivery. The survey encompasses 25 published ... [more ▼]

This paper surveys English medium instruction (EMI) lecturer training worldwide in order to inform decisions by practitioners tasked with its design and delivery. The survey encompasses 25 published initiatives from 18 countries. These were analysed for their content components and delivery methods as well as training challenges and recommendations. This analysis revealed four main components: language, communication, pedagogy and EMI awareness. Most programmes were delivered face to face but some were blended with a substantial amount of online and independent work. Delivery methods could broadly be classified into group classes, individual support and peer learning. Microteaching with reflection, feedback and observation was a widely recurring and highly rated activity. Programmes were typically developed in-house by English language professionals. Recurring challenges were contextualisation, group heterogeneity, lecturer confidence and the lack of incentivisation. The paper concludes with pedagogical recommendations for the development of EMI lecturer training programmes. [less ▲]

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See detailMaternal genetic risk for depression and child human capital
Menta, Giorgia; Lepinteur, Anthony UL; Clark, Andrew et al

in Journal of Health Economics (2023), 87

We here address the causal relationship between the maternal genetic risk for depression and child human capital using UK birth-cohort data. We find that an increase of one standard deviation (SD) in the ... [more ▼]

We here address the causal relationship between the maternal genetic risk for depression and child human capital using UK birth-cohort data. We find that an increase of one standard deviation (SD) in the maternal polygenic risk score for depression reduces their children’s cognitive and non-cognitive skill scores by 5 to 7% of a SD throughout adolescence. Our results are robust to a battery of sensitivity tests addressing, among others, concerns about pleiotropy and dynastic effects. Our Gelbach decomposition analysis suggests that the strongest mediator is genetic nurture (through maternal depression itself), with genetic inheritance playing only a marginal role. [less ▲]

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See detailA meshfree point collocation method for elliptic interface problems
Kraus, Heinrich; Kuhnert, Jörg; Meister, Andreas et al

in Applied Mathematical Modelling (2023), 113

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See detailSmart cloud collocation: geometry-aware adaptivity directly from CAD
Jacquemin, Thibault; Suchde, Pratik UL; Bordas, Stéphane P. A.

in Computer-Aided Design (2023), 154

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See detailLattice dynamics and Raman spectrum of supertetragonal PbVO3
Bouvier, Pierre; Sasani, Alireza; Bousquet, Eric et al

in Journal of Physics and Chemistry of Solids (2023), 173(111092), 111092

Lead vanadate PbVO3 is a polar crystal with a P4mm space group under ambient conditions. PbVO3 is isostructural with the model soft mode-driven ferroelectric PbTiO3, but it differs due to the so-called ... [more ▼]

Lead vanadate PbVO3 is a polar crystal with a P4mm space group under ambient conditions. PbVO3 is isostructural with the model soft mode-driven ferroelectric PbTiO3, but it differs due to the so-called “supertetragonal” elongation of its unit cell. In this study, we investigated the lattice dynamics of PbVO3 based on Raman spectroscopy at room temperature and first-principle calculations. All zone-center transverse optical phonon modes were identified by polarized, angle-dependent Raman spectroscopy and assigned as follows: E modes at 136, 269, 374, and 508 cm−1; A1 modes at 188, 429, and 874 cm−1, and B1 mode at 319 cm−1. The calculations confirmed the experimental symmetry assignment and allowed us to obtain the longitudinal optical phonon wavenumbers. In addition, we analyzed the mode eigenvectors in detail in order to identify the atomic displacements associated with each mode and compare them with PbTiO3. Despite differences in chemistry and strain, the phonon eigenvectors were found to be highly comparable in both compounds. We investigated the position of the ferroelectric soft mode in PbVO3 compared with PbTiO3. Sizeable splitting of the B1+E modes appeared as a characteristic feature of supertetragonal phases. The peculiarity of the vanadyl V–O bond frequency in PbVO3 was also addressed. [less ▲]

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See detailBorder integration in different world regions: benefitting communities or territories?
Koff, Harlan UL

in Zarate, Carlos; Aponte, Jorge; Victorino, Nicolas (Eds.) Fronteras sin muros ni hegemonías: encuentros entre la Amazonia, América y Europa (2023)

This chapter responds to the following question: “Are territories at the service of their communities, or are communities at the service of their territories?” The normative implications of this query are ... [more ▼]

This chapter responds to the following question: “Are territories at the service of their communities, or are communities at the service of their territories?” The normative implications of this query are both timely and necessary. Whereas national borders were invented in the Westphalian system to protect citizens and provide security, the contemporary reinforcement of borders has in many ways increased vulnerability and risk for local populations. In general, cross-border integration has been viewed in terms of economic growth and political/social relations. Social impacts and human security are often pushed to the background. This implies a normative bias towards territory-based rather than community-based integration. This chapter engages these debates on human vs. public security. It examines four border cases: 1) Lille-Kortrijk- Tournai Eurométropole, 2) Bari, Italy-Durres, Albania, 3) San Diego, usa- Tijuana, Mexico and 4) Cúcuta, Colombia-San Cristóbal, Venezuela. [less ▲]

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See detailResults - TRB
Bigi, Federico UL

Scientific Conference (2023)

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See detailForeword
Powell, Justin J W UL

in Amrhein, Bettina; Naraian, Srikala (Eds.) Reading Inclusion Divergently: Articulations from Around the World (2023)

Globally, the meanings ascribed to inclusive education as a simultaneously pedagogical, social, and political concept are frequently contested, and often complex, yet they must always be contextualized if ... [more ▼]

Globally, the meanings ascribed to inclusive education as a simultaneously pedagogical, social, and political concept are frequently contested, and often complex, yet they must always be contextualized if we are to make sense of them. This is not least because of the complicated relationship of inclusive education to special education, with a long history of community ambivalence, professional dominance, and sociopolitical controversy. The diversity of readings of dynamic conceptualizations of inclusive education and ensuing patterns of practice around the world is the subject of Reading Inclusion Divergently. This volume of contributions builds upon dialogue among scholars from diverse cultures and working in different regions, whose contexts of work and study range considerably in their political and pedagogical understandings of inclusive education, equity, and diversity, as of disability and disadvantage. Emphasizing the process of inclusion as well as the dynamics of interpretation, instead of the unidirectional, linear development focus on policy implementation and gaps, the editors and authors position themselves within the broad spectrum of voices of the global inclusion movement that derives its myriad perspectives from academic and policy to practitioner and advocacy-activist communities. The theoretical, methodological, and empirical diversity of these contributions re!ects contrasting concepts and institutionalizations of special and inclusive education worldwide; an important undertaking as the rhetoric threatens to become increasingly separated from local school realities. While special and inclusive education fundamentally re!ect societal and educational change, these have also affected change in identifying differences in student bodies and the resulting pedagogical responses. During ongoing educational expansion, from contrasting starting points, schooling has changed quantitatively and qualitatively. Those who participate in special and inclusive education, from students and families to teachers and professionals, have also transformed education and society, especially with regard to understandings of dis/ability. This influence has been increasingly visible in the classifications and categories of dis/ability, and in the organizational forms, from original asylums and special schools and classes established so long ago to today’s classrooms that (aspire to) valorize student diversity, which has always been a central challenge of teaching. Yet the (necessary?) existence of such segregated and stigmatizing settings is not everywhere similarly contested, despite the global norm of inclusive education mandated in human rights charters over the past decades. Indeed, such settings are still taken for granted in many contexts – or even bolstered, paradoxically, under the banner of inclusion. Today, widespread recognition of the importance of education for public and private goods such as equity, emancipation, and participation galvanizes contemporary debates. If special education successfully provided learning opportunities to children previously excluded from schooling completely, in many countries the goal has forcefully shifted to inclusive education, yet there has also been backlash against this idea(l). The paradigm shift has certainly not been universally completed, as many chapters in this volume emphasize, no matter which world region we explore, especially due to widespread disadvantages and institutionalized discrimination that remains endemic. Yet the contributions here not only critique policy designs and multilevel reforms, proposed and ongoing, but mainly provide rich understandings of inclusion and of older and nascent forms of difference in schooling – and the dilemmas that follow. In so doing, these texts generate multidimensional perspectives on what inclusive education is becoming. Ideally, inclusive settings support all children, regardless of their characteristics, who attend neighborhood schools and are guided in their individual learning processes to reach their learning goals in diverse classrooms. Yet in much of the world, even the most basic supports and services for disadvantaged students or children with disabilities are (completely) lacking, with impairment, poverty, and educational and social exclusion intertwined. Universally, children and youth need support to achieve their learning goals; albeit to varying degrees and at different times – and the responses to these needs are similarly diverse. Traditionally, special education has provided additional support for the heterogeneous group of learners perceived as having ‘special educational needs’ or labeled and grouped in innumerable categories, mainly defined by clinical, legal, and educational professions. The academic discourse of disability studies in education points out forcefully the danger of these often de"cit-oriented categories and classifications and the legitimated, though questionable, diagnostics that especially clinical professions have often applied, pushing pedagogical considerations to the background. Attempting to make sense of global similarities as well as persistent cross-national and intercultural differences in special and inclusive education requires different approaches, as these contributions emphasize. Comparative and international education research, more than ever, should take on the challenge of explaining variation within and between national contexts in ‘inclusive education’ – and the resulting consequences for students and social groups. Thus, this volume’s contributions provide welcome additions to the literature. Structured in several sections, Reading Inclusion Divergently begins with chapters aiming to understand inclusion as a project devoted to achieving equity and attaining social justice in divergent contexts affected by cultural, politico-legal, and socioeconomic factors. Here, challenges to democracy, rampant ableism, and persistent educational and social inequalities underscore the necessity of education reforms embedded in broader social and political responses, especially to secure human rights. Analyses of such change necessarily embrace history, often long-term colonial and conflict-ridden trajectories that are at once local, national, and global. Inclusive schooling must acknowledge and respond to these legacies, whether in the existing structures and materials or the processes and practices, such as diagnostics and classification, that reproduce power, strati"cation, and inequity. Disability studies, and the global disability movement more generally, offer important lessons as they emphasize the necessity of participatory and emancipatory approaches across the disciplines and fields, including the arts. Other readings offer critical interrogations of inclusive practices in diverse local contexts and in so doing deepen our knowledge of the range of struggles facing inclusion initiatives, from teachers’ discriminatory practices to associations and other corporate groups’ roles and influences in maintaining the status quo to the subversion of inclusive goals via narrow or contradictory interpretations of inclusion. Everywhere, education systems require transformation to be fully inclusive, but how to define and reach that goal is an urgent undertaking; one that remains contentious. Epistemologically and methodologically, the assembled analyses of inclusive education are varied in their approaches to complex and shifting conceptualizations. By contrast, the contributions together clearly mark the importance of transnational and transcultural research, whether viewed from a bird’s-eye or participatory face-to-face perspective. Here, collaboration, including joint interpretation across boundaries – cultural, disciplinary, epistemological, and methodological – is essential to develop shared understandings and valid reconstructions across contexts. Bringing together voices from the Global North and Global South and at various levels of analysis, this book facilitates a rich and important dialogue, showing pathways to fuller understandings of the worldwide discourses and dialectics of inclusive education. [less ▲]

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See detailApproaches to the Border between Diffusion and Fortification
Wille, Christian UL

Article for general public (2023)

Borders are increasingly at the center of social debate. The resurgence of borders manifests itself in a paradoxical way: For while border walls are once again being built and border facilities are being ... [more ▼]

Borders are increasingly at the center of social debate. The resurgence of borders manifests itself in a paradoxical way: For while border walls are once again being built and border facilities are being expanded, regulatory and control practices are increasingly fragmented and invisible in transterritorial terms. These developments point to the need to rethink the concept of borders, which is still unquestioned in many places. For this purpose, selected approaches are presented in an overview. [less ▲]

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See detailBrussels II ter Regulation, Commentary of Article 52 Authorities Competent for Enforcement
Cuniberti, Gilles UL

in Mankowski, Peter; Magnus, Ulrich (Eds.) Brussels IIter Regulation (2023)

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See detailDerived categories of (nested) Hilbert schemes
Belmans, Pieter UL; Krug, Andreas

in Michigan Mathematical Journal (2023)

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See detailBrussels II ter Regulation, Commentary of Article 51 Enforcement Procedure
Cuniberti, Gilles UL

in Mankowski, Peter; Magnus, Ulrich (Eds.) Brussels IIter Regulation (2023)

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See detailBrussels II ter Regulation, Commentary of Article 56 Suspension and Refusal
Cuniberti, Gilles UL

in mankowski, Peter; Magnus, Ulrich (Eds.) Brussels IIter Regulation (2023)