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See detailLa recherche en éducation au Luxembourg à l’aune des publications scientifiques
Dusdal, Jennifer UL; Powell, Justin J W UL; Thönnessen, Luisa Charlotte UL

in Luxembourg Centre for Educational Testing; Université du Luxembourg; SCRIPT (Eds.) Rapport national sur l’éducation au Luxembourg 2021 (2021)

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See detailBildungsforschung in Luxemburg im Spiegel wissenschaftlicher Publikationen (integrale Fassung)
Dusdal, Jennifer UL; Powell, Justin J W UL; Thönnessen, Luisa Charlotte UL

in Service de la Recherche et de l’Innovation pédagogiques (SCRIPT); Luxembourg Centre for Educational Testing (LUCET) (Eds.) Rapport national sur l’éducation au Luxembourg 2021 (2021)

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See detailBildungsforschung in Luxemburg im Spiegel wissenschaftlicher Publikationen
Dusdal, Jennifer UL; Powell, Justin J W UL; Thönnessen, Luisa Charlotte UL

in Universität Luxemburg; SCRIPT; Luxembourg Centre for Educational Testing (Eds.) Nationaler Bildungsbericht Luxemburg 2021 (2021)

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See detailIl linguaggio cinematografico di Dante Alighieri nella "Divina Commedia"
Cicotti, Claudio UL

Presentation (2021, December 03)

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See detailPresenter: Peripheries at the Centre. Borderland Schooling in Interwar Europe
Venken, Machteld UL

Scientific Conference (2021, December 03)

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See detailTransforming secondary education in the Belgian–German borderlands (1918–1939)
Venken, Machteld UL

in History of Education (2021)

Establishing and implementing rules that would teach pupils to become citizens became a crucial technique for turning those spots on the map of Europe whose sovereignty had shifted after the First World ... [more ▼]

Establishing and implementing rules that would teach pupils to become citizens became a crucial technique for turning those spots on the map of Europe whose sovereignty had shifted after the First World War into lived social spaces. This article uses Arnold Van Gennep’s notion that a shift in social status possesses a spatiality and temporality of its own, in order to analyse how principals of secondary schools negotiated transformation in the Belgian–German borderlands. It asks whether and how they were called on to offer training that would make the borderlands more cohesive with the rest of Belgium in terms of the social origins of pupils and the content of study, and examines the extent to which they were historical actors with room for their own decision-making on creating and abolishing a liminal phase, thereby leading secondary education through its rites of passage. [less ▲]

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See detailConciliatory reasoning, self-defeat, and abstract argumentation
Knoks, Aleks UL

in Review of Symbolic Logic (2021), First View

According to conciliatory views on the significance of disagreement, it’s rational for you to become less confident in your take on an issue in case your epistemic peer’s take on it is different. These ... [more ▼]

According to conciliatory views on the significance of disagreement, it’s rational for you to become less confident in your take on an issue in case your epistemic peer’s take on it is different. These views are intuitively appealing, but they also face a powerful objection: in scenarios that involve disagreements over their own correctness, conciliatory views appear to self-defeat and, thereby, issue inconsistent recommendations. This paper provides a response to this objection. Drawing on the work from defeasible logics paradigm and abstract argumentation, it develops a formal model of conciliatory reasoning and explores its behavior in the troubling scenarios. The model suggests that the recommendations that conciliatory views issue in such scenarios are perfectly reasonable---even if outwardly they may look odd. [less ▲]

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See detailPan Am and Socialist Romania: Flying from New York to Bucharest in the 1970s
Stefan, Oana Adelina UL

Presentation (2021, December 02)

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See detailSupporting Grocery Shopping to Achieve a Healthy and Sustainable Diet – How Developing a Behavioural Theory Informs Dynamic Smartphone Applications
Blanke, Julia UL

Doctoral thesis (2021)

Health and sustainability are becoming increasingly important in current lifestyles. In this context healthy and sustainable grocery shopping is one key aspect to facilitate a balanced and environmentally ... [more ▼]

Health and sustainability are becoming increasingly important in current lifestyles. In this context healthy and sustainable grocery shopping is one key aspect to facilitate a balanced and environmentally friendly diet. Many people are interested in changing their habits to become healthier and to consider their impact on the environment through the choices they make. But many do not consider where a healthy and sustainable diet starts. In other words, people frequently have a vague idea that grocery shopping is an important aspect of a healthy and sustainable lifestyle, but they lack sufficient knowledge and action plans to act accordingly. Therefore, the observable behaviour in many cases shows what is called the intention-action/behaviour gap, the attitude-behaviour gap, or the knowing-doing gap (Ajzen, 2016; Grunert, 2011; Hoek, Pearson, James, Lawrence, & Friel, 2017; de Schutter, 2015; Bailey & Harper, 2015). To break this deadlock people, who are interested in such a lifestyle change, need the required information and support to create appropriate action plans to lead them through their grocery shopping without incurring excessive cognitive impact. The risk of such cognitive strain is that people give up easily on their good intentions and fall back into old unhealthy or environmentally impacting habits. Smartphones are ubiquitous and therefore could potentially solve many of these problems, but the design of suitable applications is mostly ad-hoc and not based on thorough modelling. On the other hand, existing behavioural models are considered to be too static and not up to the task of dynamically assessing and influencing behaviour as would be required by a smartphone-based intervention (Riley, et al., 2011; Spruijt-Metz & Nilsen, 2014). To address these problems this work proposes three major contributions: first, a novel comprehensive model of behaviour built on well-established theories used in psychology and the social science. The novelty is the consistent integration of well-proven pre-existing theories into one single comprehensive model that aims to capture the benefits and tries to overcome the limitations of each base theory. Based on this model, the second contribution of this work is the evaluation of motivation and intention to buy healthy and sustainable groceries. It has been found that health is more important than sustainability in this regard, and that health-related goals are easier to act on than sustainability related goals resulting in a bigger intention-action gap for sustainable grocery shopping. To address these issues, the third major contribution of this work is a model-derived design framework for smartphone-based interventions that provides comprehensive guidelines for developing applications to assess and support a specific behaviour, such as grocery shopping, while at the same time aiming at addressing a superordinate issue, such as health and sustainability. [less ▲]

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See detailEntre force et diplomatie spatiale : le missile russe Nudol s'invite à la table des négociations
Zarkan, Laetitia UL; Degrange, Valentin; Peter, Hugo

E-print/Working paper (2021)

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See detailA Systematic Literature Review of Empirical Methods and Risk Representation in Usable Privacy and Security Research
Distler, Verena UL; Fassl, Matthias; Habib, Hana et al

in ACM Transactions on Computer-Human Interaction (2021), 28(6), 50

Usable privacy and security researchers have developed a variety of approaches to represent risk to research participants. To understand how these approaches are used and when each might be most ... [more ▼]

Usable privacy and security researchers have developed a variety of approaches to represent risk to research participants. To understand how these approaches are used and when each might be most appropriate, we conducted a systematic literature review of methods used in security and privacy studies with human participants. From a sample of 633 papers published at five top conferences between 2014 and 2018 that included keywords related to both security/privacy and usability, we systematically selected and analyzed 284 full-length papers that included human subjects studies. Our analysis focused on study methods; risk representation; the use of prototypes, scenarios, and educational intervention; the use of deception to simulate risk; and types of participants. We discuss benefits and shortcomings of the methods, and identify key methodological, ethical, and research challenges when representing and assessing security and privacy risk. We also provide guidelines for the reporting of user studies in security and privacy. [less ▲]

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See detailMassive Superpoly Recovery with Nested Monomial Predictions
Hu, Kai; Sun, Siwei; Todo, Yosuke et al

in Advances in Cryptology - ASIACRYPT 2021 - 27th International Conference on the Theory and Application of Cryptology and Information Security Singapore, December 6-10, 2021, Proceedings, Part I (2021, December)

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See detailHow relaxing develops and affects well-being throughout childhood
Cunsolo, Sabbiana; Cebotari, Victor UL; Richardson, Dominic et al

E-print/Working paper (2021)

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See detailIn pursuit of the best standards: what material and legal interoperability for NATO forces?
Zarkan, Laetitia UL

in NATO Legal Gazette (2021), (42), 36-52

In the wake of the increasing development and use of space systems, alliances and partnerships appear to be the solution for minimising the risk of harmful interferences, reducing costs, and further apply ... [more ▼]

In the wake of the increasing development and use of space systems, alliances and partnerships appear to be the solution for minimising the risk of harmful interferences, reducing costs, and further apply advancement in new technologies. The military uses space systems to support a wide range of activities such as intelligence gathering, telecommunications, tracking, positioning, navigation, and early warnings to detect ballistic missile launches. Interoperability is bringing under the spotlight the disparities between technologically advanced and less-advanced States. Only a few States are able to produce and access space technologies individually and subsequently determine the standards and operational parameters. The utilisation of space systems requires like-minded operators who collectively agree on the same idea of norms of behaviours, threat characterisation, and thresholds for interference. This article critically engages with the idea that interoperability poses legal problems and an unfair burden on the less developed members of the Alliance. This article presents a two-fold analysis of interoperability challenges in utilising space equipment, with particular attention to joint responsibility during hostilities. Ensuring space systems' functionality appears necessary to preserve the operational effectiveness of the space infrastructure used by different operators. In turn, this entails the existence of interoperable systems and compliance with standards and regulations unilaterally set by the most technologically advanced States and sometimes not collectively agreed or developed. If allies want to operate the same equipment, they need to thwart compatibility issues from both a technical and legal perspective. In focusing on a small number of technologically advanced States to fix the interoperability standards, other States are deprived of a certain degree of autonomy and protection as they will have to share proprietary information. Moreover, less developed States are not able to fully control their operations or decide their responsibility for joint activities. [less ▲]

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