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See detailThe evolution of the right to an effective remedy and to a fair trial in direct and indirect taxation: Are we there yet?
Pantazatou, Aikaterini UL

in Bonelli, Matteo; Eliantonio, Mariolina; Gentile, Giulia (Eds.) Article 47 of the EU Charter and effective judicial protection: The Court of Justice’s perspective (in press)

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See detailAuswirkungen der Grenzschließungen auf die systemrelevanten Arbeitskräfte und den grenzüberschreitenden Arbeitsmarkt in der Großregion während der Covid-19-Pandemie
Nienaber, Birte UL; Funk, Ines; Dörrenbächer, H. Peter et al

in Brodowski, Dominik; Nesselhauf, Jonas; Weber, Florian (Eds.) Pandemisches Virus - nationales Handeln (in press)

With the border closures in spring 2020, it became difficult for cross-border workers - also in the so-called "Großregion" / "Grande-Région" - to reach their jobs. Especially essential workers in the ... [more ▼]

With the border closures in spring 2020, it became difficult for cross-border workers - also in the so-called "Großregion" / "Grande-Région" - to reach their jobs. Especially essential workers in the health, rescue and industrial sectors were at the centre of the debate about a lack of solidarity between the different border regions and countries. This article analyses the impact of border closures on different aspects of solidarity in the Greater Region, the border region with the highest number of cross-border workers in Europe. Solidarity as a European value has been put to the test - both between countries (e.g. through the 'theft' of key labour and border controls making cross-border mobility almost impossible) and between different groups of workers, such as teleworkers and non-teleworkers, as well as between cross-border commuters and non-cross-border commuters, who have been treated differently, for example through short-time working schemes (e.g. in the health sector). [less ▲]

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See detailA theory-driven design framework for smartphone applications to support healthy and sustainable grocery shopping
Blanke, Julia UL; Billieux, Joel; Vögele, Claus UL

in Human Behavior and Emerging Technologies (in press)

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See detailShort-Packet Communications in Multi-Hop Networks with WET: Performance Analysis and Deep Learning-Aided Optimization
Nguyen, Toan Van; Nguyen, van Dinh UL; Costa, Daniel Benevides da et al

in IEEE Transactions on Wireless Communications (in press)

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See detailTranslanguaging in frühkindlichen Bildungseinrichtungen in Luxemburg – mehrsprachiges Handeln von Kindern und Pädagoginnen
Kirsch, Claudine UL; Mortini, Simone; Kemp, Valérie UL

in Meier, Jörg; İnci, Dirim; Blaschitz, Verena (Eds.) Handbuch Mehrsprachigkeit (in press)

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See detailWhen the Going Gets Tough, Do the Tough Go Shopping?
Pan, Xiaodan; Dresner, Martin; Mantin, Benny UL

in Journal of Business Logistics (in press)

This study examines the impacts of consumer confidence on stockpiling behavior and, subsequently, retail inventory management. We show how stockpiling behavior evolved during the “Great Recession” of 2008 ... [more ▼]

This study examines the impacts of consumer confidence on stockpiling behavior and, subsequently, retail inventory management. We show how stockpiling behavior evolved during the “Great Recession” of 2008-2009 as consumer confidence waned and demonstrate the impact of this development on inventory management. Drawing on the two-segment household inventory theory consisting of non-stockpiling and stockpiling segments, we use a panel dataset (2005-2015) to calibrate household inventory holdings. This dataset then serves as input for a retailer-level case study. Our empirical analysis reveals significant impacts from changing stockpiling behavior. When consumer confidence is low, both stockpiling and non-stockpiling segments respond by reducing weekly consumption rates; however, the stockpiling segment also significantly lengthens the time between shopping trips, and ultimately increases the duration of inventory holdings. These changes to consumption and stockpiling add complexity to inventory planning, requiring retailers to carefully adjust inventory levels to maintain service levels. [less ▲]

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See detailLocal scaling limits of Lévy driven fractional random fields
Pilipauskaite, Vytauté UL; Surgailis, Donatas

in Bernoulli (in press)

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See detailSemiparametric estimation of McKean-Vlasov SDEs
Belomestny, Denis; Pilipauskaite, Vytauté UL; Podolskij, Mark UL

in Annales de l'Institut Henri Poincaré (B), Probabilités et Statistiques (in press)

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See detailData-driven Mutation Analysis for Cyber-Physical Systems
Vigano, Enrico UL; Cornejo, Oscar; Pastore, Fabrizio UL et al

in IEEE Transactions on Software Engineering (in press)

Cyber-physical systems (CPSs) typically consist of a wide set of integrated, heterogeneous components; consequently, most of their critical failures relate to the interoperability of such components ... [more ▼]

Cyber-physical systems (CPSs) typically consist of a wide set of integrated, heterogeneous components; consequently, most of their critical failures relate to the interoperability of such components. Unfortunately, most CPS test automation techniques are preliminary and industry still heavily relies on manual testing. With potentially incomplete, manually-generated test suites, it is of paramount importance to assess their quality. Though mutation analysis has demonstrated to be an effective means to assess test suite quality in some specific contexts, we lack approaches for CPSs. Indeed, existing approaches do not target interoperability problems and cannot be executed in the presence of black-box or simulated components, a typical situation with CPSs. In this paper, we introduce data-driven mutation analysis, an approach that consists in assessing test suite quality by verifying if it detects interoperability faults simulated by mutating the data exchanged by software components. To this end, we describe a data-driven mutation analysis technique (DaMAT) that automatically alters the data exchanged through data buffers. Our technique is driven by fault models in tabular form where engineers specify how to mutate data items by selecting and configuring a set of mutation operators. We have evaluated DaMAT with CPSs in the space domain; specifically, the test suites for the software systems of a microsatellite and nanosatellites launched on orbit last year. Our results show that the approach effectively detects test suite shortcomings, is not affected by equivalent and redundant mutants, and entails acceptable costs. [less ▲]

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See detailRevising the justification for an EU tax in a post-crisis context
Pantazatou, Aikaterini UL

in de Cogan, Dominic; Brassey, Alexis (Eds.) Tax Law in Times of Crisis and Recovery (in press)

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See detailLuxembourg. ECEC Workforce profile
de Moll, Frederick UL; Kemp, Valérie UL; Simoes Lourêiro, Kevin UL et al

Report (in press)

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See detailCalabi-Yau structures for multiplicative preprojective algebras
Scherotzke, Sarah UL; Calaque, Damien; Bozec, Tristan

in Journal of Noncommutative Geometry (in press)

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See detailRelative critical loci and quiver moduli
Scherotzke, Sarah UL; Calaque, Damien; Bozec, Tristan

in Annales Scientifiques de l'École Normale Supérieure (in press)

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See detailThe Relation Between Executive Functions and Math Intelligence in Preschool Children: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis
Emslander, Valentin UL; Scherer, Ronny

in Psychological Bulletin (in press)

Executive functions (EFs) are key skills underlying other cognitive skills that are relevant to learning and everyday life. Although a plethora of evidence suggests a positive relation between the three ... [more ▼]

Executive functions (EFs) are key skills underlying other cognitive skills that are relevant to learning and everyday life. Although a plethora of evidence suggests a positive relation between the three EF subdimensions inhibition, shifting, and updating, and math skills for schoolchildren and adults, the findings on the magnitude of and possible variations in this relation are inconclusive for preschool children and several narrow math skills (i.e., math intelligence). Therefore, the present meta-analysis aimed to (a) synthesize the relation between EFs and math intelligence (an aggregate of math skills) in preschool children; (b) examine which study, sample, and measurement characteristics moderate this relation; and (c) test the joint effects of EFs on math intelligence. Utilizing data extracted from 47 studies (363 effect sizes, 30,481 participants) from 2000 to 2021, we found that, overall, EFs are significantly related to math intelligence (r = .34, 95% CI [.31, .37]), as are inhibition (r = .30, 95% CI [.25, .35]), shifting (r = .32, 95% CI [.25, .38]), and updating (r = .36, 95% CI [.31, .40]). Key measurement characteristics of EFs, but neither children’s age nor gender, moderated this relation. These findings suggest a positive link between EFs and math intelligence in preschool children and emphasize the importance of measurement characteristics. We further examined the joint relations between EFs and math intelligence via meta-analytic structural equation modeling. Evaluating different models and representations of EFs, we did not find support for the expectation that the three EF subdimensions are differentially related to math intelligence. [less ▲]

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See detailClinical relevance of attentional biases in pediatric chronic pain: an eye-tracking study
Soltani, Sabine; van Ryckeghem, Dimitri UL; Vervoort, Tine et al

in Pain (in press)

Attentional biases have been posited as one of the key mechanisms underlying the development and maintenance of chronic pain and co-occurring internalizing mental health symptoms. Despite this theoretical ... [more ▼]

Attentional biases have been posited as one of the key mechanisms underlying the development and maintenance of chronic pain and co-occurring internalizing mental health symptoms. Despite this theoretical prominence, a comprehensive understanding of the nature of biased attentional processing in chronic pain and its relationship to theorized antecedents and clinical outcomes is lacking, particularly in youth. This study used eye-tracking to assess attentional bias for painful facial expressions and its relationship to theorized antecedents of chronic pain and clinical outcomes. Youth with chronic pain (n = 125) and without chronic pain (n = 52) viewed face images of varying levels of pain expressiveness while their eye gaze was tracked and recorded. At baseline, youth completed questionnaires to assess pain characteristics, theorized antecedents (pain catastrophizing, fear of pain, and anxiety sensitivity), and clinical outcomes (pain intensity, interference, anxiety, depression, and posttraumatic stress). For youth with chronic pain, clinical outcomes were reassessed at 3 months to assess for relationships with attentional bias while controlling for baseline symptoms. In both groups, youth exhibited an attentional bias for painful facial expressions. For youth with chronic pain, attentional bias was not significantly associated with theorized antecedents or clinical outcomes at baseline or 3-month follow-up. These findings call into question the posited relationships between attentional bias and clinical outcomes. Additional studies using more comprehensive and contextual paradigms for the assessment of attentional bias are required to clarify the ways in which such biases may manifest and relate to clinical outcomes. [less ▲]

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See detailFuture Pasts: Web Archives and Public History as Challenges for Historians of Education in Times of COVID-19
Priem, Karin UL; Grosvenor, Ian

in Herman, Frederik; Braster, Sjaak; del Mar del Pozo Andrés, Maria (Eds.) Exhibiting the Past: Public Histories of Edcuatuon (in press)

The COVID-19 pandemic has not only sparked a renewed interest in history; it has also focused our attention on how the present can be historically preserved. Therefore, it is safe to predict that the ... [more ▼]

The COVID-19 pandemic has not only sparked a renewed interest in history; it has also focused our attention on how the present can be historically preserved. Therefore, it is safe to predict that the COVID-19 crisis and its documentation will be analyzed by future historians, and it will bring about methodological and technological changes that affect our ways of working as historians of education. This chapter will examine the following: First, it looks at some basic characteristics of web archives and how they challenge our work as historians. Second, it offers reflections on different modes of archival access and on how this may affect current concepts of the past. Third, the chapter discusses how web archives relate to public history and, next, introduces the Education & Pandemics Archive launched by the International Standing Conference for the History of Education (ISCHE). The chapter will also provide preliminary insights into how web archives may affect our work as historians of education. Web archives offer different structures, opportunities for different interactions and technological environments. They can be characterized by collaborative processes by networked data within a flattened structure, and by interconnected hardware and software environments. Web archives are user-friendly, flexible and invite us to get involved and to develop new historical dimensions. [less ▲]

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See detailEntangled Media Ecologies: The Nexus of Education and Mass Communication from the Perspective of UNESCO (1945-1989)
Priem, Karin UL

in Flury, Carmen; Geiss, Michael (Eds.) How Computers Entered the Classroom (1960-2000): Historical Perspectives (in press)

Numerous studies and handbooks in the history of education are devoted to the history of educational media and the evolution of educational technologies. This chapter puts an explicit focus on the ... [more ▼]

Numerous studies and handbooks in the history of education are devoted to the history of educational media and the evolution of educational technologies. This chapter puts an explicit focus on the implications and conceptual background of the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization´s (UNESCO) technology-driven idea of education, which already took shape before the 1957 Sputnik shock. Eager to establish strong bonds between mass communication and education, UNESCO by the late 1940s had already begun to set up a powerful internal apparatus for media policy which soon closely collaborated with its Education Division. From the late 1970s, UNESCO set out to establish a New World Information and Communication Order to further stabilize its global role in education and media policies. This chapter posits that textbooks, radio, TV, film, and computers were serving as interconnected elements of UNESCO’s educational mission. By looking at these specific technological ecologies of education, I connect research into the history of education with research into UNESCO´s media policies. This conceptual history approach demonstrates that education is not only based on ethical norms, teaching, and learning but is also connected to technological properties that offer access to knowledge and its acquisition. In addition, and when studying UNESCO, it becomes evident that the organization´s education-technology-nexus is also very much connected with the media and publishing industries. [less ▲]

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See detailEconomic insecurity and political preferences
Bossert, Walter; Clark, Andrew UL; d'Ambrosio, Conchita UL et al

in Oxford Economic Papers (in press)

Economic insecurity has attracted growing attention, but there is no consensus as to its definition. We characterize a class of individual economic-insecurity measures based on the time profile of ... [more ▼]

Economic insecurity has attracted growing attention, but there is no consensus as to its definition. We characterize a class of individual economic-insecurity measures based on the time profile of economic resources. We apply this economic-insecurity measure to political-preference data in the USA, UK, and Germany. Conditional on current economic resources, economic insecurity is associated with both greater political participation (support for a party or the intention to vote) and more support for conservative parties. In particular, economic insecurity predicts greater support for both Donald Trump before the 2016 US Presidential election and the UK leaving the European Union in the 2016 Brexit referendum. [less ▲]

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See detailLessons from Investment Treaty Arbitration
Garcia Olmedo, Javier UL

in Haslehner, Werner; Rust, Alexander; Kofler (Eds.) Alternative Dispute Resolution in Taxation (in press)

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See detailImmunity Defences and the Enforcement of Awards in Investor-State Disputes
Garcia Olmedo, Javier UL

in Nasir Gore, Kiran; Duggal, Kabir; Putilin, Elijah (Eds.) et al Investment Law & Arbitration in Central Asia: Emerging Issues (in press)

This chapter critically examines the claim that investment treaty awards have a final and binding character. It finds that, despite providing different mechanisms of collection, the ICSID and New York ... [more ▼]

This chapter critically examines the claim that investment treaty awards have a final and binding character. It finds that, despite providing different mechanisms of collection, the ICSID and New York Conventions provide states with a tool to avoid compliance with investment treaty awards based on sovereign immunity rules. These rules have been invoked by states in an increasing number of cases, creating a hurdle for investors to obtain payment of the award. This chapter concludes with some potential remedies to the immunity bar. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 26 (1 UL)