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See detailThe evolution of the right to an effective remedy and to a fair trial in direct and indirect taxation: Are we there yet?
Pantazatou, Aikaterini UL

in Bonelli, Matteo; Eliantonio, Mariolina; Gentile, Giulia (Eds.) Article 47 of the EU Charter and effective judicial protection: The Court of Justice’s perspective (in press)

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See detailAuswirkungen der Grenzschließungen auf die systemrelevanten Arbeitskräfte und den grenzüberschreitenden Arbeitsmarkt in der Großregion während der Covid-19-Pandemie
Nienaber, Birte UL; Funk, Ines; Dörrenbächer, H. Peter et al

in Brodowski, Dominik; Nesselhauf, Jonas; Weber, Florian (Eds.) Pandemisches Virus - nationales Handeln (in press)

With the border closures in spring 2020, it became difficult for cross-border workers - also in the so-called "Großregion" / "Grande-Région" - to reach their jobs. Especially essential workers in the ... [more ▼]

With the border closures in spring 2020, it became difficult for cross-border workers - also in the so-called "Großregion" / "Grande-Région" - to reach their jobs. Especially essential workers in the health, rescue and industrial sectors were at the centre of the debate about a lack of solidarity between the different border regions and countries. This article analyses the impact of border closures on different aspects of solidarity in the Greater Region, the border region with the highest number of cross-border workers in Europe. Solidarity as a European value has been put to the test - both between countries (e.g. through the 'theft' of key labour and border controls making cross-border mobility almost impossible) and between different groups of workers, such as teleworkers and non-teleworkers, as well as between cross-border commuters and non-cross-border commuters, who have been treated differently, for example through short-time working schemes (e.g. in the health sector). [less ▲]

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See detailA theory-driven design framework for smartphone applications to support healthy and sustainable grocery shopping
Blanke, Julia UL; Billieux, Joel; Vögele, Claus UL

in Human Behavior and Emerging Technologies (in press)

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See detailThe distributive impact of the Luxembourg tax-benefit system: a more comprehensive measurement
Vergnat, Vincent; d'Ambrosio, Conchita UL; Liégeois, Philippe

in Public Finance Review (in press)

This article studies the distribution of income in Luxembourg by integrating two aspects that have been previously neglected: indirect taxation and in-kind transfers. The integration of the latter is ... [more ▼]

This article studies the distribution of income in Luxembourg by integrating two aspects that have been previously neglected: indirect taxation and in-kind transfers. The integration of the latter is essential in Luxembourg, the country with the highest public expenditure per capita in the OECD. These issues have been understudied because of some methodological challenges, including the lack of data containing all the necessary information for this type of analysis. However, with the EUROMOD microsimulation model, different data sources, and imputation methods, we are able to obtain a more complete view of the income distribution in Luxembourg. We find that, as in many developed countries, indirect taxes are regressive. On the other hand, in-kind transfers play an important role in reducing income inequality, in particular through education and health services. [less ▲]

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See detailAsynja: Sensorial Design for Running Motivation
Menheere, Daphne; Hilderink, Myrthe; Vos, Steven et al

in IASDR 2021: 9th Congress of the International Association of Societies of Design Research (in press)

If starting to run is an easy decision, committing to a long-term running routine proves to be a more challenging endeavor for many people. In this pictorial, we unravel the design process of Asynja, an ... [more ▼]

If starting to run is an easy decision, committing to a long-term running routine proves to be a more challenging endeavor for many people. In this pictorial, we unravel the design process of Asynja, an artefact that triggers exercise imagery by using natural scents related to running. Relying on peripheral interaction, this research probe subtly nudges users to go running, thereby supporting them to transform their positive intentions into actions. Exploring sensoriality as a design opportunity for behavior change interventions, we invite the community to expand the design space of exercise-related motivational products and systems. [less ▲]

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See detailUX Needs Cards – A Pragmatic Tool to Support Experience Design Through Psychological Needs
Lallemand, Carine UL

in IASDR 2021: 9th Congress of the International Association of Societies of Design Research (in press)

The psychological needs-driven UX approach is a well-explored area in UX research and a powerful framework for the design of optimal experiences with systems and products. However, the transfer from ... [more ▼]

The psychological needs-driven UX approach is a well-explored area in UX research and a powerful framework for the design of optimal experiences with systems and products. However, the transfer from research to practice is slow and this approach is not yet widely used by practitioners. As card- based methods have been shown to support designers in both the generation of ideas and the evaluation of their designs, we created the UX needs cards as a pragmatic tool able to support a needs-driven UX process. We present the iterative development of the card-set and its associated techniques and report on three use cases, demonstrating the effectiveness of this tool for user research, idea generation and UX evaluation. Our empirical findings suggest that the UX needs cards are a valuable tool able to support design practice, being easily understood by lay users and a source of inspiration for designers. Acting as a tangible translation of a research framework, the UX needs cards promote theory-driven design strategies and provide researchers, designers, and educators with a tool to clearly communicate the framework of psychological needs. [less ▲]

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See detailDISCOV: Stimulating Physical Activity through an Explorative Interactive Walking Experience
van Renswouw, Loes; Verhoef, Jasmijn; Vos, Steven et al

in IASDR 2021: 9th Congress of the International Association of Societies of Design Research (in press)

Aware of the consequences of their inactive lifestyles, many people still struggle to integrate enough physical activity into their busy lives. Interventions that nudge to reinforce existing active ... [more ▼]

Aware of the consequences of their inactive lifestyles, many people still struggle to integrate enough physical activity into their busy lives. Interventions that nudge to reinforce existing active behavior seem therefore more likely to be effective than those adding an activity to daily routines. To encourage people to increase their physical activity level, we designed Discov, a network of physical waypoints triggering people to lengthen their walks. Placed in a public park, Discov encourages people to explore their surroundings in a fun and challenging way by creating an interactive walking experience. Adopting a Research-through-Design approach, we explore the potential of the design of accessible infrastructures and human-environment interactions to impact public health by nudging citizens into being more physically active. We discuss insights gathered through this process and report on first user tests of this interactive walking experience. [less ▲]

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See detailEduCHI 2022 - 4th Annual Symposium on HCI Education
McDonald, Craig; St-Cyr, Olivier; Gray, Colin M. et al

in Proceedings of the CHI 2022 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems (in press)

EduCHI 2022 will bring together an international community of scholars, practitioners, and researchers to shape the future of Human-Computer Interaction (HCI) education. Held as part of the CHI 2022 ... [more ▼]

EduCHI 2022 will bring together an international community of scholars, practitioners, and researchers to shape the future of Human-Computer Interaction (HCI) education. Held as part of the CHI 2022 conference, the two-day symposium will feature in- teractive discussions about trends, curricula, pedagogies, teaching practices, and current and future challenges facing HCI educators. In addition to providing a platform to share curriculum plans and teaching materials, EduCHI 2022 will also provide opportunities for HCI educators to learn new instructional strategies and deepen their pedagogical knowledge. [less ▲]

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See detailShort-Packet Communications in Multi-Hop Networks with WET: Performance Analysis and Deep Learning-Aided Optimization
Nguyen, Toan Van; Nguyen, van Dinh UL; Costa, Daniel Benevides da et al

in IEEE Transactions on Wireless Communications (in press)

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See detailMomentary Subjective Age is Associated with Perceived and Physiological Stress in the Daily Lives of Old and Very Old Adults
Kornadt, Anna Elena UL; Pauly, Theresa; Schilling, Oliver et al

in Psychology and Aging (in press)

Subjective age, that is the age people feel in relation to their chronological age, can vary on a day-to-day and even momentary basis. Previous long-term and daily-diary studies have shown that elevated ... [more ▼]

Subjective age, that is the age people feel in relation to their chronological age, can vary on a day-to-day and even momentary basis. Previous long-term and daily-diary studies have shown that elevated stress covaries with older subjective age. However, it is an open question whether such links can also be observed at the momentary level within a given day and go beyond self-reports of stress. Moving ahead, we investigated how two indicators of stress (self-reported: perceived stress; physiological: salivary cortisol) are associated with the age people feel on a momentary basis. We examined data from 118 older (Mage = 66.67 years) and 36 very old adults (Mage = 85.92 years) who reported their momentary subjective age and perceived stress and also provided saliva samples up to seven times a day over seven consecutive days. Dynamic structural equation models showed that both higher momentary perceived stress and higher cortisol levels preceding the measurement predicted an older momentary subjective age. In contrast, subjective age at the previous measurement did not predict subsequent stress. These effects were moderated by participant age group and grip strength, albeit not consistently. Our results corroborate and extend earlier findings that both self-reported and physiological stress are important explanatory variables for people’s subjective age variation even on relatively short time scales, and shed light on differential time-ordered dynamics between stress and subjective age in daily life. Findings also inform theoretical models of subjective age that highlight the importance of contextual, momentary influences on how old people feel and help better understand how biological and psychological processes are intertwined in later life. [less ▲]

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See detail„Ich will mein altes Leben zurück“ – Einblicke in die veränderten Beziehungen, Aktivitäten und das Wohlbefinden luxemburgischer Kinder in der Pandemie
Kirsch, Claudine UL; Neumann, Sascha

in Diskurs Kindheits- und Jugendforschung (in press)

The Covid-19 pandemic has changed children's lives. This paper presents the changes during the pandemic of children’s well-being, relationships and everyday activities from the perspective of six to ... [more ▼]

The Covid-19 pandemic has changed children's lives. This paper presents the changes during the pandemic of children’s well-being, relationships and everyday activities from the perspective of six to twelve-year-olds in Luxembourg. The data draw on interviews carried out in 2020 and standardised surveys in 2020 and 2021. The results show that all children were affected by the pandemic but experienced it differently. Many children expressed fears and worries right at the beginning of the pandemic and these emotions intensified over time. Their leisure time activities shifted from more outside to more domestic activities during the pandemic which in our view corresponds to an intermediate “domestication of childhood”. The survey in the summer of 2021 confirms that many of these changes remained or intensified. [less ▲]

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See detailTranslanguaging in frühkindlichen Bildungseinrichtungen in Luxemburg – mehrsprachiges Handeln von Kindern und Pädagoginnen
Kirsch, Claudine UL; Mortini, Simone; Kemp, Valérie UL

in Meier, Jörg; İnci, Dirim; Blaschitz, Verena (Eds.) Handbuch Mehrsprachigkeit (in press)

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See detailLocal scaling limits of Lévy driven fractional random fields
Pilipauskaite, Vytauté UL; Surgailis, Donatas

in Bernoulli (in press)

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See detailSemiparametric estimation of McKean-Vlasov SDEs
Belomestny, Denis; Pilipauskaite, Vytauté UL; Podolskij, Mark UL

in Annales de l'Institut Henri Poincaré (B) Probabilités et Statistiques (in press)

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See detailClinical relevance of attentional biases in pediatric chronic pain: an eye-tracking study
Soltani, Sabine; van Ryckeghem, Dimitri UL; Vervoort, Tine et al

in Pain (in press)

Attentional biases have been posited as one of the key mechanisms underlying the development and maintenance of chronic pain and co-occurring internalizing mental health symptoms. Despite this theoretical ... [more ▼]

Attentional biases have been posited as one of the key mechanisms underlying the development and maintenance of chronic pain and co-occurring internalizing mental health symptoms. Despite this theoretical prominence, a comprehensive understanding of the nature of biased attentional processing in chronic pain and its relationship to theorized antecedents and clinical outcomes is lacking, particularly in youth. This study used eye-tracking to assess attentional bias for painful facial expressions and its relationship to theorized antecedents of chronic pain and clinical outcomes. Youth with chronic pain (n = 125) and without chronic pain (n = 52) viewed face images of varying levels of pain expressiveness while their eye gaze was tracked and recorded. At baseline, youth completed questionnaires to assess pain characteristics, theorized antecedents (pain catastrophizing, fear of pain, and anxiety sensitivity), and clinical outcomes (pain intensity, interference, anxiety, depression, and posttraumatic stress). For youth with chronic pain, clinical outcomes were reassessed at 3 months to assess for relationships with attentional bias while controlling for baseline symptoms. In both groups, youth exhibited an attentional bias for painful facial expressions. For youth with chronic pain, attentional bias was not significantly associated with theorized antecedents or clinical outcomes at baseline or 3-month follow-up. These findings call into question the posited relationships between attentional bias and clinical outcomes. Additional studies using more comprehensive and contextual paradigms for the assessment of attentional bias are required to clarify the ways in which such biases may manifest and relate to clinical outcomes. [less ▲]

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See detailDistance-based social index numbers: a unifying approach
Bossert, Walter; d'Ambrosio, Conchita UL; Weber, Shlomo

in Journal of Mathematical Economics (in press)

We present a unified approach to the design of social index numbers. Our starting point is a model that employs an exogenously given partition of the population into subgroups. Three classes of group ... [more ▼]

We present a unified approach to the design of social index numbers. Our starting point is a model that employs an exogenously given partition of the population into subgroups. Three classes of group-dependent measures of deprivation are characterized. The three groups are nested and, beginning with the largest of these, we narrow them down by successively adding two additional axioms. This leads to a parameterized class the members of which are based on the differences between the income (or wealth) levels of an individual and those who are better off. We then proceed to show that our measures are sufficiently general to accommodate a plethora of indices, including measures of inequality and polarization as well as distance-based measures of phenomena such as diversity and fractionalization. [less ▲]

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See detailDiskurs-Figuren. Wie Politik und Öffentlichkeit über Sprache sprechen
Purschke, Christoph UL

in Pigeron, Isabelle; Poirier, Philippe (Eds.) Vingt années de recherches électorales au Luxembourg (in press)

Detailed reference viewed: 43 (0 UL)
See detailNorm und Normativität
Becker, Katrin UL

in Schneck,; Lieb, Claudia; Siebenpfeiffer, Hania (Eds.) Handbuch Literatur und Recht (in press)

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See detailDesigning and delivering an online research article writing course for doctoral students in Luxembourg during COVID-19
Deroey, Katrien UL; Skipp, Jennifer

in Fenton, James (Ed.) International Perspectives on Teaching Academic English in Higher Education in Times of Covid-19 (in press)

This chapter reports on the design, delivery and evaluation of an online research article writing course for doctoral students. The course format was a response to COVID-19 but was designed to be ... [more ▼]

This chapter reports on the design, delivery and evaluation of an online research article writing course for doctoral students. The course format was a response to COVID-19 but was designed to be sustainable through enabling flexible, interactive, personalised and independent learning. Its five major components are independent learning tasks, online workshops, writing output, peer review and consultations. Moodle is used for resources and assignments; WebEx for workshops and consultations. Students independently use the e-coursebook to read the theory and submit tasks based on their own texts and articles in their discipline ahead of a workshop on the topic. Additionally, they periodically submit article drafts and engage in peer review. Consultations with the instructor further personalise learning. Having described the course, the chapter goes on to evaluate its affordances and issues by reporting student feedback and teachers’ experiences. It was found that students greatly appreciated the systematic work on their writing in tasks and workshops. However, workshop preparation was very time-consuming for teachers and students would prefer them to be ‘offline’. Furthermore, multidisciplinary peer reviewing and the need to write throughout the course were positively perceived, although requiring greater flexibility in submission times. Consultations were also rated as extremely useful. We conclude with recommendations regarding online course delivery and a blended adaptation for post-COVID purposes. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 41 (3 UL)