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See detailA theory-driven design framework for smartphone applications to support healthy and sustainable grocery shopping
Blanke, Julia UL; Billieux, Joel; Vögele, Claus UL

in Human Behavior and Emerging Technologies (in press)

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See detailOn unavoidable families of meromorphic functions
Meyrath, Thierry UL

in Canadian Mathematical Bulletin (in press)

We prove several results on unavoidable families of meromorphic functions. For instance, we give new examples of families of cardinality three that are unavoidable with respect to the set of meromorphic ... [more ▼]

We prove several results on unavoidable families of meromorphic functions. For instance, we give new examples of families of cardinality three that are unavoidable with respect to the set of meromorphic functions on $\C$. We further obtain families consisting of less than three functions that are unavoidable with respect to certain subsets of meromorphic functions. In the other direction, we show that for every meromorphic function $f$, there exists an entire function that avoids $f$ on $\C$. [less ▲]

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See detailFostering experimental and computational synergy to modulate hyperinflammation
Del Sol Mesa, Antonio UL

in Trends in Immunology (in press)

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See detailUncertainty-driven symmetry-breaking and stochastic stability in a generic differential game of lobbying
Boucekkine, Raouf; Fabien, Prieur; Ruan, Weihua et al

in Economic Theory (in press)

We study a 2-players stochastic differential game of lobbying. Players invest in lobbying activities to alter the legislation in her own benefit. The payoffs are quadratic and uncertainty is driven by a ... [more ▼]

We study a 2-players stochastic differential game of lobbying. Players invest in lobbying activities to alter the legislation in her own benefit. The payoffs are quadratic and uncertainty is driven by a Wiener process. We consider the Nash symmetric game where players face the same cost and extract symmetric payoffs, and we solve for Markov Perfect Equilibria (MPE) in the class of affine functions. First, we prove a general sufficient (catching up) optimality condition for two-players stochastic games with uncertainty driven by Wiener processes. Second, we prove that the number and nature of MPE depend on the extent of uncertainty (i.e the variance of the Wiener processes). In particular, we prove that while a symmetric MPE always exists, two asymmetric MPE emerge if and only if uncertainty is large enough. Third, we study the stochastic stability of all the equilibria. We notably find, that the state converges to a stationary invariant distribution under asymmetric MPE. Fourth, we study the implications for rent dissipation asymptotically and compare the outcomes of symmetric vs asymmetric MPE in this respect, ultimately enhancing again the role of uncertainty. [less ▲]

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See detailIs a dynamic approach to tax games relevant?
Paulus, Nora; Pieretti, Patrice UL; Zou, Benteng UL

in Annals of Economics and statistics (in press)

In this paper, we argue that static models provide an incomplete analysis of interjurisdictional tax competition. Accordingly, one can doubt whether a one-shot view is suitable for analyzing real world ... [more ▼]

In this paper, we argue that static models provide an incomplete analysis of interjurisdictional tax competition. Accordingly, one can doubt whether a one-shot view is suitable for analyzing real world tax competition. Contrary to previous contributions in tax competition, we are able to model the interplay between changing tax rates and sluggish factor adjustments. We demonstrate that the intensity of tax competition is impacted by the temporal nature of the game. The commitment of governments to stick to their tax policies for a given period (open-loop behavior) leads to less intense competition relative to a static approach. If the policymakers continuously update their tax rates (Markovian behavior), competition is fiercer than in a static game, except for the case where capital adjustment is relatively sluggish and the governments' marginal valuation of public goods is high enough. [less ▲]

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See detailSonderpädagogische Fördersysteme und inklusive Bildung
Powell, Justin J W UL; Pfahl, Lisa; Blanck, Jonna M.

in Bittlingmayer, Uwe; Bauer, Ullrich; Scherr, Albert (Eds.) Handbuch Bildungs- und Erziehungssoziologie (in press)

In diesem Beitrag wird aus der Perspektive der Bildungssoziologie ein kritischer Blick auf die sonderpädagogischen Förderschulsysteme, die Sonderpädagogik und die Folgen von Sonderbeschulung für ... [more ▼]

In diesem Beitrag wird aus der Perspektive der Bildungssoziologie ein kritischer Blick auf die sonderpädagogischen Förderschulsysteme, die Sonderpädagogik und die Folgen von Sonderbeschulung für Schülergruppen mit Behinderungen und Benachteiligungen entwickelt. Dazu werden Kennzeichen sonderpädagogischer Förderung zusammengefasst und in historischer Perspektive wichtige Entwicklungen sonderpädagogischer Fördersysteme nachgezeichnet. Hierzu werden Ergebnisse ländervergleichender Studien dargestellt sowie Erkenntnisse macht- und diskursanalytischer Forschung zur Sonderpädagogik präsentiert, die die Persistenz schulischer Segregation erklären. Abschließend wird eine lebensverlaufs- bzw. biografieanalytische Perspektive auf die Folgen schulischer Segregation eingenommen und ein Fazit gezogen. [less ▲]

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See detailDistance-based social index numbers: a unifying approach
Bossert, Walter; d'Ambrosio, Conchita UL; Weber, Shlomo

in Journal of Mathematical Economics (in press)

We present a unified approach to the design of social index numbers. Our starting point is a model that employs an exogenously given partition of the population into subgroups. Three classes of group ... [more ▼]

We present a unified approach to the design of social index numbers. Our starting point is a model that employs an exogenously given partition of the population into subgroups. Three classes of group-dependent measures of deprivation are characterized. The three groups are nested and, beginning with the largest of these, we narrow them down by successively adding two additional axioms. This leads to a parameterized class the members of which are based on the differences between the income (or wealth) levels of an individual and those who are better off. We then proceed to show that our measures are sufficiently general to accommodate a plethora of indices, including measures of inequality and polarization as well as distance-based measures of phenomena such as diversity and fractionalization. [less ▲]

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See detailDiskurs-Figuren. Wie Politik und Öffentlichkeit über Sprache sprechen
Purschke, Christoph UL

in Pigeron, Isabelle; Poirier, Philippe (Eds.) Vingt années de recherches électorales au Luxembourg (in press)

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See detailEnseignement et apprentissage à distance. Pistes de développement pour une culture numérique au Luxembourg
Baumann, Isabell Eva UL; Harion, Dominic UL

in Rapport sur l‘éducation Luxembourg 2021 (in press)

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See detailNorm und Normativität
Becker, Katrin UL

in Schneck,; Lieb, Claudia; Siebenpfeiffer, Hania (Eds.) Handbuch Literatur und Recht (in press)

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See detailDesigning and delivering an online research article writing course for doctoral students in Luxembourg during COVID-19
Deroey, Katrien UL; Skipp, Jennifer

in Fenton, James (Ed.) International Perspectives on Teaching Academic English in Higher Education in Times of Covid-19 (in press)

This chapter reports on the design, delivery and evaluation of an online research article writing course for doctoral students. The course format was a response to COVID-19 but was designed to be ... [more ▼]

This chapter reports on the design, delivery and evaluation of an online research article writing course for doctoral students. The course format was a response to COVID-19 but was designed to be sustainable through enabling flexible, interactive, personalised and independent learning. Its five major components are independent learning tasks, online workshops, writing output, peer review and consultations. Moodle is used for resources and assignments; WebEx for workshops and consultations. Students independently use the e-coursebook to read the theory and submit tasks based on their own texts and articles in their discipline ahead of a workshop on the topic. Additionally, they periodically submit article drafts and engage in peer review. Consultations with the instructor further personalise learning. Having described the course, the chapter goes on to evaluate its affordances and issues by reporting student feedback and teachers’ experiences. It was found that students greatly appreciated the systematic work on their writing in tasks and workshops. However, workshop preparation was very time-consuming for teachers and students would prefer them to be ‘offline’. Furthermore, multidisciplinary peer reviewing and the need to write throughout the course were positively perceived, although requiring greater flexibility in submission times. Consultations were also rated as extremely useful. We conclude with recommendations regarding online course delivery and a blended adaptation for post-COVID purposes. [less ▲]

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See detailI Want to Start My Own Business. Can I Ask Our Firm or Family for Help?
Fletcher, Denise Elaine UL

in Jaskiewicz, Peter; Rau, Sabine (Eds.) Enabling Next Generation Legacies”: 35 Questions that Next Generation Members in Enterprising Families Ask (in press)

It is often said that the entrepreneurs of today are the family businesses of tomorrow. This assertion is supported by findings in a Global Entrepreneurship Monitor (2019-20) Report on ‘Family ... [more ▼]

It is often said that the entrepreneurs of today are the family businesses of tomorrow. This assertion is supported by findings in a Global Entrepreneurship Monitor (2019-20) Report on ‘Family Entrepreneurship’ which cites that 75% of respondent entrepreneurs across 48 economies indicate that their family was actively involved in either starting or developing a new business . In spite of this, and the fact that it is becoming more popular for family firms to encourage entrepreneurialism within the younger generation, it is often challenging for Next Gens to ‘carve out’ an entrepreneurial identity for themselves. This is even more so the case if the intention is to pursue new ideas that are not central to the core business and which might disturb long-planned succession strategies, or expectations held by senior family members. Making the decision to get on board the entrepreneur(ship) is an important career decision that has huge implications, not only for the Next Gens who are planning this, but also for current members of the family business who might have to adjust their expectations. [less ▲]

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See detailAre Value-Added Scores Stable Enough for High-Stakes Decisions?
Emslander, Valentin UL; Levy, Jessica UL; Scherer, Ronny et al

Scientific Conference (2022, March)

Theoretical Background: Can we quantify the effectiveness of a teacher or a school with a single number? Researchers in the field of value-added (VA) models may argue just that (e.g., Chetty et al., 2014 ... [more ▼]

Theoretical Background: Can we quantify the effectiveness of a teacher or a school with a single number? Researchers in the field of value-added (VA) models may argue just that (e.g., Chetty et al., 2014; Kane et al., 2013). VA models are widely used for accountability purposes in education and quantify the value a teacher or a school adds to their students’ achievement. For this purpose, these models predict achievement over time and attempt to control for factors that cannot be influenced by schools or teachers (i.e., sociodemographic & sociocultural background). Following this logic, what is left must be due to teacher or school differences (see, e.g., Braun, 2005). To utilize VA models for high-stakes decision-making (e.g., teachers’ tenure, the allocation of funding), these models would need to be highly stable over time. School-level stability over time, however, has hardly been researched at all and the resulting findings are mixed, with some studies indicating high stability of school VA scores over time (Ferrão, 2012; Thomas et al., 2007) and others reporting a lack of stability (e.g., Gorard et al., 2013; Perry, 2016). Furthermore, as there is no consensus on which variables to use as independent or dependent variables in VA models (Everson, 2017; Levy et al., 2019), the stability of VA could vary between different outcome measures (e.g., language or mathematics). If VA models lack stability over time and across outcome measures, their use as the primary information for high-stakes decision-making is in question, and the inferences drawn from them could be compromised. Questions: With these uncertainties in mind, we examine the stability of school VA model scores over time and investigate the differences between language and mathematics achievement as outcome variables. Additionally, we demonstrate the real-life implications of (in)stable VA scores for single schools and point out an alternative, more constructive use of school VA models in educational research. Method: To study the stability of VA scores on school level over time and across outcomes, we drew on a sample of 146 primary schools, using representative longitudinal data from the standardized achievement tests of the Luxembourg School Monitoring Programme (LUCET, 2021). These schools included a heterogeneous and multilingual sample of 7016 students. To determine the stability of VA scores in the subject of mathematics and in languages over time, we based our analysis on two longitudinal datasets (from 2015 to 2017 and from 2017 to 2019, respectively) and generated two VA scores per dataset, one for language and one for mathematics achievement. We further analyzed how many schools displayed stable VA scores in the respective outcomes over two years, and compared the rank correlations of VA scores between language and mathematics achievement as an outcome variable. Results and Their Significance: Only 34-38 % of the schools showed stable VA scores from grade 1 to 3 with moderate rank correlations of r = .37 with language and r = .34 with mathematics achievement. We therefore discourage using VA models as the only information for high-stakes educational decisions. Nonetheless, we argue that VA models could be employed to find genuinely effective teaching or school practices—especially in heterogeneous student populations, such as Luxembourg, in which educational disparities are an important topic already in primary school (Hoffmann et al., 2018). Consequently, we contrast the school climate and instructional quality, which might be a driver of the differences between schools with stable high vs. low VA scores. Literature Braun, H. (2005). Using student progress to evaluate teachers: A primer on value-added models. Educational Testing Service. Chetty, R., Friedman, J. N., & Rockoff, J. E. (2014). Measuring the impacts of teachers I: Evaluating bias in teacher value-added estimates. American Economic Review, 104(9), 2593–2632. https://doi.org/10.1257/aer.104.9.2593 Everson, K. C. (2017). Value-added modeling and educational accountability: Are we answering the real questions? Review of Educational Research, 87(1), 35–70. https://doi.org/10.3102/0034654316637199 Ferrão, M. E. (2012). On the stability of value added indicators. Quality & Quantity, 46(2), 627–637. https://doi.org/10.1007/s11135-010-9417-6 Gorard, S., Hordosy, R., & Siddiqui, N. (2013). How unstable are “school effects” assessed by a value-added technique? International Education Studies, 6(1), 1–9. https://doi.org/10.5539/ies.v6n1p1 Kane, T. J., McCaffrey, D. F., Miller, T., & Staiger, D. O. (2013). Have We Identified Effective Teachers? Validating Measures of Effective Teaching Using Random Assignment. Research Paper. MET Project. Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation. https://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/ED540959.pdf Levy, J., Brunner, M., Keller, U., & Fischbach, A. (2019). Methodological issues in value-added modeling: An international review from 26 countries. Educational Assessment, Evaluation and Accountability, 31(3), 257–287. https://doi.org/10.1007/s11092-019-09303-w LUCET. (2021). Épreuves Standardisées (ÉpStan). https://epstan.lu Perry, T. (2016). English value-added measures: Examining the limitations of school performance measurement. British Educational Research Journal, 42(6), 1056–1080. https://doi.org/10.1002/berj.3247 Thomas, S., Peng, W. J., & Gray, J. (2007). Modelling patterns of improvement over time: Value added trends in English secondary school performance across ten cohorts. Oxford Review of Education, 33(3), 261–295. https://doi.org/10.1080/03054980701366116 [less ▲]

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See detailDeFi, Not So Decentralized: The Measured Distribution of Voting Rights
Barbereau, Tom Josua UL; Smethurst, Reilly UL; Papageorgiou, Orestis UL et al

in Proceedings of the Hawaii International Conference on System Sciences 2022 (2022, January)

Bitcoin and Ethereum are frequently promoted as decentralized, but developers and academics question their actual decentralization. This motivates further experiments with public permissionless ... [more ▼]

Bitcoin and Ethereum are frequently promoted as decentralized, but developers and academics question their actual decentralization. This motivates further experiments with public permissionless blockchains to achieve decentralization along technical, economic, and political lines. The distribution of tokenized voting rights aims for political decentralization. Tokenized voting rights achieved notoriety within the nascent field of decentralized finance (DeFi) in 2020. As an alternative to centralized crypto-asset exchanges and lending platforms (owned by companies like Coinbase and Celsius), DeFi developers typically create non-custodial projects that are not majority-owned or managed by legal entities. Holders of tokenized voting rights can instead govern DeFi projects. To scrutinize DeFi’s distributed governance strategies, we conducted a multiple-case study of non-custodial, Ethereum-based DeFi projects: Uniswap, Maker, SushiSwap, Yearn Finance, and UMA. Our findings are novel and surprising: quantitative evaluations of DeFi’s distributed governance strategies reveal a failure to achieve political decentralization. [less ▲]

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See detailFinancing post-growth? Green financial products for changed logics of production
Dörry, Sabine; Schulz, Christian UL

in Lange, Bastian; Hülz, Martina; Schmid, Benedikt (Eds.) et al Post-Growth Geographies. Spatial Relations of Diverse and Alternative Economies (2022)

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See detailPost-Growth Geographies. Spatial Relations of Diverse and Alternative Economies
Lange, Bastian; Hülz, Martina; Schmid, Benedikt et al

Book published by Transcript (2022)

Post-Growth Geographies examines the spatial relations of diverse and alternative economies between growth-oriented institutions and multiple socio-ecological crises. The book brings together conceptual ... [more ▼]

Post-Growth Geographies examines the spatial relations of diverse and alternative economies between growth-oriented institutions and multiple socio-ecological crises. The book brings together conceptual and empirical contributions from geography and its neighbouring disciplines and offers different perspectives on the possibilities, demands and critiques of post-growth transformation. Through case studies and interviews, the contributions combine voices from activism, civil society, planning and politics with current theoretical debates on socio-ecological transformation. [less ▲]

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See detailPost-growth geographies. Conceptual and thematic cornerstones of this book
Schulz, Christian UL; Lange, Bastian; Hülz, Martina et al

in Lange, Bastian; Hülz, Martina; Schmid, Benedikt (Eds.) et al Post-Growth Geographies. Spatial Relations of Diverse and Alternative Economies (2022)

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See detailThe growth fixation of the European Union. A commentary on the draft Green Deal
Schulz, Christian UL

in Lange, Bastian; Hülz, Martina; Schmid, Benedikt (Eds.) et al Post-Growth Geographies. Spatial Relations of Diverse and Alternative Economies (2022)

Detailed reference viewed: 47 (1 UL)