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See detailTropy
Takats, Sean UL; Mullen, Abby

Software (2016)

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See detailFrontaliers atypiques dans la Grande-Région SaarLorLux
Wille, Christian UL; Helfer, Malte UL; Caruso, Geoffrey UL et al

E-print/Working paper (2016)

The Greater Region is characterised by the singular independence of its labour market between its different sectors. Cross-border commuting across national borders has been facilitated in a tangible way ... [more ▼]

The Greater Region is characterised by the singular independence of its labour market between its different sectors. Cross-border commuting across national borders has been facilitated in a tangible way by the process of European unification, as a result of which the status of cross-border commuters has been defined from the point of view of social and fiscal rights. This definition does not distinguish between border workers who migrate from their "home region" to the neighbouring country and those who come from the neighbouring country to the "home region" to join their place of work. The last-mentioned atypical border phenomenon is becoming increasingly important in the Greater Region. It is therefore in the context of residential mobility and atypical mobility of cross-border employees that the motivations of the latter as well as questions relating to the spatial organisation of daily practices are analysed in the context of the change of domicile. Aspects of social life at the place of residence will also be investigated and the subjective evaluation of residential migration will be detailed. The evaluation of each of these elements is based on the comparative study of atypical commuting at the border between Luxembourg and Lorraine/Saarland. [less ▲]

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See detailLes Parcs naturels dans la Grande Région SaarLorLux
Deshaies, Michel; Caruso, Geoffrey UL; Helfer, Malte UL et al

E-print/Working paper (2016)

The nature parks are essentially rural areas, relatively extensive, whose landscapes, shaped mainly by traditional agricultural activities, have characteristics and aesthetic qualities favourable to the ... [more ▼]

The nature parks are essentially rural areas, relatively extensive, whose landscapes, shaped mainly by traditional agricultural activities, have characteristics and aesthetic qualities favourable to the reception and development of leisure activities and green tourism. Relatively far from the major urban areas, the landscapes have undergone little transformation under the influence of suburbanisation. The nature parks were set up at different times, within an institutional framework and with objectives that differed significantly depending on the legislation in force in the four countries; the emphasis was initially placed on nature protection, but from the 1990s onwards, sustainable local development became increasingly important. [less ▲]

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See detailPossessions en prêt au Haut Moyen Âge des Abbayes de Gorze et Wissembourg, de 661 à environ 860
Kasten, Brigitte; Schäfer, Jens; Helfer, Malte UL et al

E-print/Working paper (2016)

In the medieval world, the abbey had multiple meanings. On the one hand, it was a place of spiritual life where the abbey community lived, prayed and worked according to the strict ideals of the rule. The ... [more ▼]

In the medieval world, the abbey had multiple meanings. On the one hand, it was a place of spiritual life where the abbey community lived, prayed and worked according to the strict ideals of the rule. The schools, libraries and scriptoriums in which manuscripts were copied and partially decorated, also made it a centre of learning and the spread of knowledge. On the other hand, the abbeys were one of the largest landowners in the Middle Ages and their abbots were not only the superiors of religious communities but also the directors of large economic centres. The endowments for their foundation and donations from royalty or nobility provided the abbeys with considerable property. These assets were by no means a coherent mass in the vicinity of the abbey, but were rather scattered over long distances. The abbeys of Wissembourg and Gorze, through the cartularies that have come down to us, lend themselves to a more precise examination of the abbeys' economy. [less ▲]

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See detailSites du patrimoine mondial de l'UNESCO dans la Grande Région SaarLorLux
Mendgen, Eva; Helfer, Malte UL; Pauly, Michel UL et al

E-print/Working paper (2016)

In 2017, the Greater Region SaarLorLux has no less than twelve sites on the UNESCO World Heritage List. They date from different periods, from prehistory to the beginning of the 20th century, and belong ... [more ▼]

In 2017, the Greater Region SaarLorLux has no less than twelve sites on the UNESCO World Heritage List. They date from different periods, from prehistory to the beginning of the 20th century, and belong to different categories. Architectural and industrial monuments are part of the Greater Region's World Cultural Heritage, as are squares and entire cities, fortifications and cultural landscapes. The World Heritage sites bear witness to the rich European history and are a sign of the Greater Region's exceptional cultural diversity. They are also exceptionally beautiful and picturesque. Each of the World Heritage Sites is related to many other monuments, while providing its own context, history and spatial, cultural and social coordination system. In recent years, global and transnational aspects have gradually led to the listing of ensembles of sites and cultural landscapes. [less ▲]

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See detailCrossbenching Toward Participation as Critical Spatial Practice
Miessen, Markus UL; Avanessian, Armen; Grassegger, Hannes

Book published by Sternberg Press (2016)

With a preface by Armen Avanessian, an introduction by Hannes Grassegger and Markus Miessen, and a postscript by Patricia Reed “At the heart of this book is a simple and profound proposition: to ‘do’ ... [more ▼]

With a preface by Armen Avanessian, an introduction by Hannes Grassegger and Markus Miessen, and a postscript by Patricia Reed “At the heart of this book is a simple and profound proposition: to ‘do’ architecture is to immerse oneself in a conflictual process of material production—participation is not a productive encounter of multiple practitioners and stakeholders, but a set of conflicts, negotiations, maneuvers, and swindles between and within a multiplicity of agents, human and nonhuman alike—equally including architects, clients, financiers, and builders, say, but also silicon, plastic, concrete, each with its conflicting aims and different material means to achieve them. Every building is thus the materialization of such encounter. So, despite the hubris of the field, none of the parties to such an encounter can ultimately control that the result—architecture (unlike real estate), according to Miessen, belongs to no one but affects and is affected by everyone—and this proposition asks that we reframe questions of ethics and politics. They can no longer be the property of an individual but a collective set of interrelations—it is through such profound departure from the terms of architecture that Miessen’s new book demands nothing less than to reimagine how we might finally become citizens.” —Eyal Weizman, Professor of Spatial and Visual Cultures, Director of the Centre for Research Architecture, Goldsmiths, University of London “Miessen’s new book depicts in a challenging and projective manner the problem of politics in times of conceptual indeterminacy, where ‘participation’ of the civil society seems to become the salvation for the political mess we are in, especially in Europe. Well, it is not! ‘Participation’ will not eradicate the Front National, and more transparency will not deprive Orbán of his power. Civil society will not gain power by criticizing or demonstrating loudly against the European system or chatting on the Internet. The populists have understood that if you want power, you need parties. What we risk to lose in that participatory game is representative democracy in its current shape and for no good: the majority of the street is no democracy. The post-structuralist hype for participation fuels into the mills of those who want to play la volonté de tous against la volonté generale, to go back to Rousseau: yet, the plebs killed Socrates in Athens.“ —Ulrike Guerot, political scientist, founder and director, European Democracy Lab, Berlin [less ▲]

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See detailCrossbenching
Miessen, Markus UL; Avanessian, Armen; Reed, Patricia et al

Book published by Merve (2016)

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See detailKoszmar partycypacji + Niezależna praktyka
Miessen, Markus UL

Book published by Bęc Zmiana (2016)

Wezwanie do partycypacji jest lejtmotywem współczesnej myśli politycznej i prywatnej. Partycypacja jest wszędzie – od peryferii po korporacyjne biura. Partycypacja przekształciła politykę i zamieniła ... [more ▼]

Wezwanie do partycypacji jest lejtmotywem współczesnej myśli politycznej i prywatnej. Partycypacja jest wszędzie – od peryferii po korporacyjne biura. Partycypacja przekształciła politykę i zamieniła najpiękniejszy w dziejach wynalazek – sieć ludzi, Internet – we wszechogarniającą, nieznośną machinę domagającą się naszej natychmiastowej uwagi w każdym miejscu i o każdej porze. Partycypuj albo spadaj. Drugie wydanie książki Koszmar partycypacji z 2013 roku zostało poszerzone o esej Niezależna praktyka, w którym Miessen podsumowuje swoje rozważania dotyczące ideologii partycypacji i przedstawia alternatywne modele działania, dla których punkt wyjścia stanowi gotowość jednostki do zaangażowania się i podjęcia prawdziwie politycznych kroków. [less ▲]

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See detailCaulfield, Cauliflower, and other vegetables
Miessen, Markus UL; Feldhaus, Timo; Haliti, Flaka et al

Book published by MaHKU (2016)

What do you do with a show, where there is no narrative for a show? Where there is no red thread, no umbrella framework or common denominator in terms of content. When I first arrived at MaHKU halfway ... [more ▼]

What do you do with a show, where there is no narrative for a show? Where there is no red thread, no umbrella framework or common denominator in terms of content. When I first arrived at MaHKU halfway through the year, I encountered an inspiring, but scattered group of individuals, dealing with personal challenges and processes of identity formulation. The only means of unity that I was able to detect was that they seemed to be working in the same space, their studio. The frame: a particular year in a particular graduate program. Critical practice, in this context, could be imagined as parallel realities pushing in the same direction, that is, interrogating the political and spatial realities that the protagonists understand as their social and societal context. The work at play here presents polymorphous and polymathic approaches to the subjective documentation of the contemporary condition, diverse narrative takes, which often take as a starting point the personal struggle with the world, but – more precisely – the surveying of oneself as a critical being. Such practice should be understood and exercised as a sounding-board that makes visible and discloses the underlying conflicts of what one is facing, to exacerbate them, to create and nurture complications, to work with and around them in a productive way, and to then act upon them. As Jan Verwoert put it: “To learn the lesson of the ethics of art and ideas therefore means to develop a sense of simultaneous unconditional trust and mistrust in your own principles of sympathy and resentment, affiliation and animosity, identification and hostility.” Empowerment sometimes emerges in conditions that theoretically ought to thwart it. Knowledge is often generated at the edges or the gaps of ignorance. Hence, personal involvement should simply be understood as a tactic of complicit curiosity scaled to the space that one is currently inhabiting. It offers an alternative rendering of a possible practice that goes beyond the conventional understanding of discipline and vocation. It resembles a framework through which to act: not a strictly political one, but rather an arena for the discussion of how practice itself can become political. Literature is highly personal and biased. Most (good) literature has a Doppelter Boden (double layer). The narrative therefore is not only one of self-experience, but that, which can be projected onto and against a civil society. As opposed to journalism, which is supposed to report about a forensic reality, literature holds the opportunity to smuggle different narratives and messages across. A Doppelter Boden is an intrinsically spatial phenomenon, as – in order for the message to be transported and deployed – one needs to construct the very space in which a parallel reality can unfold. Holden Caulfield, the protagonist in Salinger’s The Catcher in the Rye, explains his love affair with the museum (Museum of Natural History) by nebulously stating parts of his personal insecurity. In life, with the world surrounding him. Like all of us, he is not only facing narratives of constant change, but also decay and loss. He demonstrates his fears and inability of dealing with conflict, confusion, and – ultimately – change. Being thrown into the dirty reality of the now, this exhibition presents a series of extremely relevant positions that deal with this very question of contemporary identity(ies) and the way in which those can be localized and grounded in a world exposed to constant flux. Maybe one of the reasons why many of us are engaged in a similar love affair with the museum is precisely its ability (and reality) to preserve and maintain a form of stoicism and silence. It is (almost) always the same. Cauliflower, as the arguably hottest (vegetable) shit on the market right now, faces the sad reality of a formerly neglected plant that has suddenly risen to fame (again). It seems that the market of the vegetable unfolds as a twofold problematic here: not only has it become more sought-after, but it is unclear for how long its net-worth will remain intact. Torn between questions of identity and a soon-to-be-dealt with dirty reality of the market, the positions in the exhibition range from Sudanese gender politics, Korean sex culture, methods of automatism, postcolonial subjectivities, to the arguable dichotomy between the craftsman and the intellectual, heritage and knowledge, architectural bastardisation, to human stewardship, the father figure, electric smog, the objectification and censorship of the female body, formats of (social) coding, to painting as spatial practice. Rather than a stable and static exhibition housed in a single institutional setting, the show is conceived as a decentralized form of localizations, depending on what the artists and the curatorial team at MaHKU saw fit. Rather than trying to contextualize the impossible, the exhibition attempts to produce moments of representation and activation, sometimes formal, sometimes informal, sometimes stable, sometimes unstable, sometimes ongoing, sometimes limited to 15 minutes, occurring in different places throughout the city of Utrecht. Instead of crudely enforcing and presenting a (fictional) narrative that did not exist in the first place, the opening of the exhibition will be used as an opportunity to informally discuss questions of identity, development, success and dirty realism in the nebula of what is commonly referred to as the art world. Partners-in-crime will be artist Flaka Haliti, cultural critic Timo Feldhaus, and curatorial consultant Marie Egger. In an essay for e-flux, Hito Steyerl suggests that falling does not only mean falling apart, it could also mean the falling into place of a new certainty: “Grappling with crumbling futures that propel us backwards onto an agonizing present, we may realize that the place we are falling toward is no longer grounded, nor is it stable. It promises no community, but a shifting formation.” Follow your instinct. Embody the willingness to govern. Collaborate when necessary. Assume responsibility. Be liable. Produce consequence: “Refraining is not an option.” [less ▲]

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See detailÉtude 730 Mise en œuvre des procédures civiles d'exécution
Cuniberti, Gilles UL

in Brenner, Claude (Ed.) Le Lamy Droit de l'exécution forcée (2016)

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See detailÉtude 720 Effet des titres étrangers en France
Richard, Vincent; Cuniberti, Gilles UL

in BRENNER, Claude (Ed.) Le Lamy Droit de l'exécution forcée (2016)

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See detailProviding Utility to Utilities : the Value of Information Systems Enabled Flexibility in Electricity Consumption
Fridgen, Gilbert UL; Häfner, Lukas; König, Christian et al

in Journal of the Association for Information Systems (2016), 17(8), 537--563

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See detailBlockchain: Fundamentals, Applications and Potential
Schlatt, Vincent; Schweizer, André; Urbach, Nils et al

Report (2016)

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See detailVibrotactile sensory substitution on personal navigation: Remotely controlled vibrotactile feedback wearable system to aid visually impaired
Silva Filgueiras, Thiago; Oliveira Lima, Ana Carolina; Lima Baima, Renan UL

in International Symposium on Medical Measurements and Applications (2016)

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See detailJILL MAGID The Proposal
Miessen, Markus UL; Hirsch, Nikolaus; KUONI, Carin et al

Book published by Sternberg Press (2016)

The eighth volume of the Critical Spatial Practice series focuses on Jill Magid’s “The Barragán Archives,” a multiyear project that examines the legacy of Pritzker Prize–winning architect Luis Barragán ... [more ▼]

The eighth volume of the Critical Spatial Practice series focuses on Jill Magid’s “The Barragán Archives,” a multiyear project that examines the legacy of Pritzker Prize–winning architect Luis Barragán (1902–1988), and questions forms of power, public access, and copyright that construct artistic legacy. The archive of Barragán was split in two after his death—the personal archive is kept in his home in Mexico, which is now a museum and UNESCO World Heritage Site; while his professional archive was purchased in 1995 by Rolf Fehlbaum, chairman of the Swiss furniture company Vitra, from a New York gallerist. It is said that Fehlbaum bought it as a gift for his then fiancée, Federica Zanco. She is the director of the Barragan Foundation, which also holds rights to Barragán’s name. For the past twenty years the archive, housed below the Vitra headquarters, has been inaccessible to the public. With The Proposal Magid attempts to bring together Barragán’s professional and personal archives by probing the architect’s official and private selves, and the interests of various individuals and governmental and corporate entities who have become the archives’ guardians. Magid, with permission of the Barragán family, commissioned a small amount of Barragán’s cremated remains to be transformed into a diamond. The stone, set in a gold ring, was offered to Zanco in exchange for the return of the professional archive to Mexico. Magid’s artwork directly engages the intersections of the psychological and the judicial, national identity and repatriation, international property rights and copyright law, authorship and ownership, the human body and the body of work. [less ▲]

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See detailFELICITY D. SCOTT Disorientation Bernard Rudofsky in the Empire of Signs
Miessen, Markus UL; HIRSCH, Nikolaus

Book published by Sternberg Press (2016)

Viennese émigré architect Bernard Rudofsky (1905–1988) is most frequently recalled for curating “Architecture without Architects,” the famous 1964 photography exhibition of vernacular, preindustrial ... [more ▼]

Viennese émigré architect Bernard Rudofsky (1905–1988) is most frequently recalled for curating “Architecture without Architects,” the famous 1964 photography exhibition of vernacular, preindustrial structures at the Museum of Modern Art in New York. Far from simply a romantic or nostalgic invocation of cultures lost to industrial modernity, Rudofsky’s exhibition drew on decades of speculations about modern architecture and urbanism, particularly their semantic, technological, institutional, commercial, and geopolitical influences. Focusing on Rudofsky’s encounters with Japan in the 1950s—he described postwar Japan as a “rear-view mirror” of the American way of life—architectural historian Felicity D. Scott revisits the architect’s readings of the vernacular both in the United States and Japan, which resonate with his attempts to imagine architecture and cities that refused to communicate in a normative sense. In a contemporary world saturated with visual information, Rudofsky’s unconventional musings take on a heightened resonance. [less ▲]

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See detailWhat Ever Happened to New Institutionalism?
VOORHIES, JAMES; Miessen, Markus UL

Book published by Sternberg Press (2016)

New Institutionalism, a mode of curating that originated in Europe in the 1990s, evolved from the legacy of international curator Harald Szeemann, the relational art advanced by French critic and theorist ... [more ▼]

New Institutionalism, a mode of curating that originated in Europe in the 1990s, evolved from the legacy of international curator Harald Szeemann, the relational art advanced by French critic and theorist Nicolas Bourriaud, and other influential factors of the time. New Institutionalism’s dispersed and varied approaches to curating sought to reconfigure the art institution from within, reshaping it into an active, democratic, open, and egalitarian public sphere. These approaches posed other possibilities and futures for institutions and exhibitions, challenging the consensual conception, production, and distribution of art. Practitioners engaged the art institution with renewed confidence by imbuing it with the potential for new aesthetic experiences and different relationships among artists, institutions, and spectators beyond engrained modernist ideologies. Working in these new modes, the art institution could become a site of fluidity, unpredictability, and risk. What Ever Happened to New Institutionalism? reflects upon the aspirations of these curatorial strategies and assesses their critical efficacy today within the landscape of contemporary art and globalized culture. The first in a series of readers examining changing characteristics of art institutions, this publication thinks through New Institutionalism by bringing together facsimiles of seminal texts, new critical essays, a history of trends and practices, and commissioned artist projects and contributions. These are complemented by documentation from the inaugural year of programming at the Carpenter Center for the Visual Arts at Harvard University focused on reimagining CCVA as a twenty-first-century institution. [less ▲]

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See detailŒuvre signée / œuvre anonyme : une opposition apparente. À propos des signatures épigraphiques d’artistes au Moyen Âge
Mineo, Emilie UL

in Douchet, Sébastien; Naudet, Valérie (Eds.) L’anonymat dans les arts et les lettres au Moyen Âge (2016)

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See detailThe future is already here – it’s just not evenly distributed
Rosenthal, Stephanie; Miessen, Markus UL

Book published by 20th Biennale of Sydney (2016)

The future is already here – it’s just not evenly distributed 20th Biennale of Sydney If each era posits its own view of reality, what is ours? The common distinction between the virtual and the physical ... [more ▼]

The future is already here – it’s just not evenly distributed 20th Biennale of Sydney If each era posits its own view of reality, what is ours? The common distinction between the virtual and the physical has become ever more elusive, and our perception of what is real ever more fluid. This book is published to accompany the 20th Biennale of Sydney, directed by Dr. Stephanie Rosenthal, which takes these keys themes as its starting point. Staged at several different venues, the exhibition is organised into several different ‘embassies of thought’, each of which are reflected in this beautifully-produced volume. Traditionally, an embassy functions as a state within a state: a system that enables the occupation and creation of new spaces in established lands. This book focusses on these and other such ‘in-between spaces’, investigating our interaction with the digital world, the blurred boundaries between art forms and the interconnection between politics and financial power structures. The future is already here… features new essays by Andre Lepecki and Franco Berardi among others, new text and visual commissions by a range of artists including Ming Wong, Dayanita Singh, Keg de Souza, Cécile B Evans, and Richard Bell, and a series of fascinating roundtable discussions with participating artists. [less ▲]

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See detailOn Tempelhofer Feld
Deboosere, Benjamin; De Raeve, Wouter; Miessen, Markus UL

Book published by Spector Books (2016)

Tempelhofer Feld, the former inner-city airport of Berlin, has for several years been the stage for an ongoing contestation at all levels of society. The question of what to do with such an immense open ... [more ▼]

Tempelhofer Feld, the former inner-city airport of Berlin, has for several years been the stage for an ongoing contestation at all levels of society. The question of what to do with such an immense open space of four square kilometers in the middle of the city has unleashed an unprecedented chain of actions and reactions. On Tempelhofer Feld does not formulate yet another alternative design for the field. Instead, it searches for a nuanced and multilayered interpretation by means of a photographic documentation of the site and conversations with academics and spatial professionals. By going through the field’s recent history, situating it in the context of Berlin’s turbulent past, laying out the socio-demographic situation of the surrounding neighborhoods, focusing on urban development, and discussing master plans that “weren’t meant to be,” On Tempelhofer Feld reflects on the interaction between spatial practice and pressing societal concerns. [less ▲]

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