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See detailL'indomptable vitalité de la mode
Roelens, Nathalie UL

in forum (2021)

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See detailThe Contribution of Microglia to Neuroinflammation in Parkinson's Disease.
Badanjak, Katja UL; Fixemer, Sonja UL; Smajic, Semra UL et al

in International journal of molecular sciences (2021), 22(9),

With the world's population ageing, the incidence of Parkinson's disease (PD) is on the rise. In recent years, inflammatory processes have emerged as prominent contributors to the pathology of PD. There ... [more ▼]

With the world's population ageing, the incidence of Parkinson's disease (PD) is on the rise. In recent years, inflammatory processes have emerged as prominent contributors to the pathology of PD. There is great evidence that microglia have a significant neuroprotective role, and that impaired and over activated microglial phenotypes are present in brains of PD patients. Thereby, PD progression is potentially driven by a vicious cycle between dying neurons and microglia through the instigation of oxidative stress, mitophagy and autophagy dysfunctions, a-synuclein accumulation, and pro-inflammatory cytokine release. Hence, investigating the involvement of microglia is of great importance for future research and treatment of PD. The purpose of this review is to highlight recent findings concerning the microglia-neuronal interplay in PD with a focus on human postmortem immunohistochemistry and single-cell studies, their relation to animal and iPSC-derived models, newly emerging technologies, and the resulting potential of new anti-inflammatory therapies for PD. [less ▲]

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See detailFunctional and Molecular Properties of DYT-SGCE Myoclonus-Dystonia Patient-Derived Striatal Medium Spiny Neurons.
Kutschenko, Anna; Staege, Selma; Grütz, Karen et al

in International journal of molecular sciences (2021), 22(7),

Myoclonus-dystonia (DYT-SGCE, formerly DYT11) is characterized by alcohol-sensitive, myoclonic-like appearance of fast dystonic movements. It is caused by mutations in the SGCE gene encoding ε-sarcoglycan ... [more ▼]

Myoclonus-dystonia (DYT-SGCE, formerly DYT11) is characterized by alcohol-sensitive, myoclonic-like appearance of fast dystonic movements. It is caused by mutations in the SGCE gene encoding ε-sarcoglycan leading to a dysfunction of this transmembrane protein, alterations in the cerebello-thalamic pathway and impaired striatal plasticity. To elucidate underlying pathogenic mechanisms, we investigated induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC)-derived striatal medium spiny neurons (MSNs) from two myoclonus-dystonia patients carrying a heterozygous mutation in the SGCE gene (c.298T>G and c.304C>T with protein changes W100G and R102X) in comparison to two matched healthy control lines. Calcium imaging showed significantly elevated basal intracellular Ca(2+) content and lower frequency of spontaneous Ca(2+) signals in SGCE MSNs. Blocking of voltage-gated Ca(2+) channels by verapamil was less efficient in suppressing KCl-induced Ca(2+) peaks of SGCE MSNs. Ca(2+) amplitudes upon glycine and acetylcholine applications were increased in SGCE MSNs, but not after GABA or glutamate applications. Expression of voltage-gated Ca(2+) channels and most ionotropic receptor subunits was not altered. SGCE MSNs showed significantly reduced GABAergic synaptic density. Whole-cell patch-clamp recordings displayed elevated amplitudes of miniature postsynaptic currents and action potentials in SGCE MSNs. Our data contribute to a better understanding of the pathophysiology and the development of novel therapeutic strategies for myoclonus-dystonia. [less ▲]

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See detailDON'T FOLLOW THE WIND
Hisch, Nickolaus; Waite, Jason; Miessen, Markus UL

Book published by Sternberg Press (2021)

The twelfth volume of the Critical Spatial Practice series focuses on “Don’t Follow the Wind,” the acclaimed collaborative project situated in the radioactive Fukushima exclusion zone. The book explores ... [more ▼]

The twelfth volume of the Critical Spatial Practice series focuses on “Don’t Follow the Wind,” the acclaimed collaborative project situated in the radioactive Fukushima exclusion zone. The book explores the long-term environmental crisis in the coastal Japanese region through this ongoing, inaccessible exhibition, which maintains traces of human presence amid the fallout of the March 2011 nuclear reactor meltdown that displaced entire towns. What can art do in a continuing catastrophe when destruction and contamination have made living impossible? The exhibition is located inside the exclusion zone, an evacuated radioactive area established after the nuclear disaster that forcibly separated residents from their homes, land, and community. In cooperation with former residents, participating artists installed newly commissioned works at sites in the exclusion zone. Although the exhibition opened in March 2015, the zone is still inaccessible to the public—the exhibition, like the radiation, is virtually invisible. The exhibition can only be viewed when restrictions are lifted and people are permitted to return. This might take several years or decades—a period that could extend beyond our lifetime. While nuclear contamination has displaced and ruptured communities, new temporary and translocal formations have emerged among the residents who have lent their sites, other former residents collaborating on the project, and the artists, curators, and cultural workers. This book includes new texts by feminist theorist Silvia Federici, art historians Noi Sawaragi and Sven Lütticken, and political philosopher Jodi Dean. The project was codeveloped and curated by the collective Don’t Follow the Wind , whose members include Chim↑Pom, Kenji Kubota, Eva & Franco Mattes, and Jason Waite. The participating artists include Ai Weiwei, Chim↑Pom, Nikolaus Hirsch & Jorge Otero-Pailos, Meiro Koizumi, Eva & Franco Mattes, Grand Guignol Mirai, Aiko Miyanaga, Ahmet Öğüt, Trevor Paglen, Taryn Simon, Nobuaki Takekawa, and Kota Takeuchi. [less ▲]

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See detailAssessment of a textile portable exoskeleton for the upper limbs' flexion
Samper-Escudero, Jose Luis; Coloma Chacon, Sofia UL; Olivares Mendez, Miguel Angel UL et al

Scientific Conference (2021)

Flexible exoskeletons are lightweight robots that surround the user’s anatomy to assist or oppose motion. Their structure is made of light and flexible materials, like fabrics, so the forces created by ... [more ▼]

Flexible exoskeletons are lightweight robots that surround the user’s anatomy to assist or oppose motion. Their structure is made of light and flexible materials, like fabrics, so the forces created by the robot are directly transferred to the user’s musculoskeletal system. Exosuits are thus sensitive to the sliding of the actuation, textile perturbations and improper fitting to the user. LUXBIT is a cable-driven flexible exoskeleton that combines fabrics and sewing patterns to promote its anatomical adaption. The exoskeleton is intended for bimanual assistance of daily tasks and long-term usage. To this end, the system reduces the pressures applied to the user and the misalignment of the actuation by stacking textile patches. The patches enhance the functioning of the base garment and promote the transference of the assistance forces. Additionally, LUXBIT has a compact actuation with deformable components to prevent the user movements from being restricted. The exoskeleton is portable by using an enhanced textile backpack. This paper shows the exoskeleton’s benefits for trajectory and muscle activity during the flexion of the shoulder and the elbow. [less ▲]

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See detailMessage from the General Chairs
Botev, Jean UL; El-Ghazawi, Tarek; Stewart, Christopher

in Proceedings of the 2nd IEEE International Conference on Autonomic Computing and Self-Organizing Systems (ACSOS) (2021)

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See detailCollaboration between home and crèches: perspectives, experiences and expectations of educators in Luxembourg
Kirsch, Claudine UL; Aleksic, Gabrijela UL

Scientific Conference (2021)

Multiliteracies in early childhood education are promoted by researchers in multilingual education (García et al., 2017) and the European Commission. One way in which educators in crèches can develop ... [more ▼]

Multiliteracies in early childhood education are promoted by researchers in multilingual education (García et al., 2017) and the European Commission. One way in which educators in crèches can develop literacies in multiple languages is through collaboration with parents. Collaboration has been shown to positively influence educators, parents, and children. Educators, for instance, become aware of children’s funds of knowledge and draw on the learners’ resources and make their teaching more linguistically and culturally inclusive (Wells Rowe & Miller, 2016). While collaboration can be highly effective, the establishment of partnerships is difficult. Successful partnerships depend on several factors, among them the professionals’ beliefs, experiences, expectations, as well as space and time (Lengyel & Salem, 2016; Reynolds et al., 2017). Collaboration has been a focus of attention in Luxembourg since the introduction of multilingual education in formal and non-formal early childhood institutions. Since 2017 teachers in schools and educators in crèches are required to develop children’s skills in Luxembourgish, familiarise them with French, and value their home languages. Partnerships with parents is one pillar of this programme. A previous study has shown that educators are beginning to develop such partnerships (Kirsch 2019). The longitudinal project Collaboration with parents and Multiliteracy in early Childhood Education (COMPARE) uses a mixed-method approach to examine the multiliteracy practices as well as partnership building between parents and educators in crèches in Luxembourg. In this paper we present the perspectives of educators on partnership building and multiliteracy. The data stem from two online questionnaires completed by educators in 2020. We examine the practitioners’ perspectives on collaboration (Betz et al. 2017), modes and types of partnerships (e.g. Thiersch, 2006), types and frequency of collaborative activities in multiple languages (e.g. Hachfeld et al., 2016), and factors influencing collaboration (e.g. Reynolds et al., 2017). The data show that the declared practices are multilingual and that parents come to the crèche to do literacy activities in languages other than the main one(s) of the crèches. However, new language hierarchies are being developed. The findings demonstrate that educators and parents are actors in shaping new policies while also pointing to some arising inequalities. [less ▲]

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See detailSocial protection and inclusion policy responses to the COVID-19 crisis. Luxembourg.
Baumann, Michèle UL; Baumann-Croisier, Pierre; Bouchet, Muriel et al

Report (2021)

Between Monday 3 February 2020 and Sunday 18 April 2021, the total number of confirmed COVID-19 cases per 100,000 people was 6,740 for the EU-27 as a whole; in Luxembourg, it was 10,545. The total number ... [more ▼]

Between Monday 3 February 2020 and Sunday 18 April 2021, the total number of confirmed COVID-19 cases per 100,000 people was 6,740 for the EU-27 as a whole; in Luxembourg, it was 10,545. The total number of deaths per 100,000 people was 126 for the EU-27, and also for Luxembourg. Section 1 presents more data on the impact of the pandemic on the demographic, economic and social situation. A total of 14 different social protection and inclusion measures deployed by the Luxembourg government to counter and mitigate the effects of the pandemic are described in Section 2 in terms of the targeted population, the timing and their novelty. These measures relate to: unemployment benefits; job protection; sickness benefits and sick pay; health insurance; minimum-income schemes and other forms of social assistance; housing support; leave for parents whose children are unable to attend school or a pre-school service by reason of COVID-19; and leave for family support. This section also analyses the social impact and the relevance of these measures, including, where appropriate, the concrete description of the benefits and (estimated) numbers of targeted populations and/or effective recipients. Some of these measures are only of a regulatory nature and do not require any expenditure of money by the government or others (e.g. the National Health fund, employers or landlords), others are associated with more or less extensive expenditure, depending on whether they are aimed at many potential recipients or only a few. In Section 3, a preliminary and tentative estimate of the induced costs of these measures is provided. According to this, the global cost would amount to roughly €996 million in 2020, which represents around 1.5% of 2019 GDP. Some of the measures have been new ones, whereas others have only been adjustments or extensions of existing measures; in either case, not all of them will continue to be in force once the pandemic is over (some have already stopped). Whether, or the degree to which, any of these temporary measures will become permanent is not predictable at this time. In general, the social protection system in Luxembourg has proved quite resilient to the COVID-19 crisis. However, a number of shortcomings have also been highlighted, several of which will most probably persist. This is the case for the growing number of people at risk of poverty, which has not been offset by the minimum income reform. The increase in the percentage of NEETs (young people not in employment, education or training), as well as in the number of unemployed people aged 16-29, is to be mentioned, together with the fact that there are still groups that are not covered by the national health insurance system. Specific groups such as non-EU migrants and homeless people have been particularly exposed to the crisis and they are also in general more heavily exposed to the risk of poverty. The shortcomings of the housing market, with ever growing prices and the spill-over effects on rent levels, have certainly been somewhat cushioned by the measures, but there have been no structural changes to a situation that keeps getting worse. In addition, the crisis has exacerbated the crucial importance of the medical workforce, which is in danger of shrinking in the next years because of upcoming retirements. Finally, the crisis has revealed the problem of self-employed people not being sufficiently covered by social security cushions. There is also a need to rethink social policy beyond the Luxembourg borders, and to improve the European co-ordination of national healthcare systems. [less ▲]

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See detailLEARN Newsletter - Édition 2021
Georges, Carrie UL; Hoffmann, Danielle; Hornung, Caroline UL et al

Book published by LEARN (2021)

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See detailLifelike Computing Systems Workshops (LIFELIKE 2020 & 2021)
Botev, Jean UL; Lewis, Peter R.; Stein, Anthony et al

in Proceedings of the 1st and 2nd International Workshop on Lifelike Computing Systems (LIFELIKE) (2021)

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See detailModel-based assessment of mammalian cell metabolic functionalities using omics data.
Richelle, Anne; Kellman, Benjamin P.; Wenzel, Alexander T. et al

in Cell reports methods (2021), 1(3),

Omics experiments are ubiquitous in biological studies, leading to a deluge of data. However, it is still challenging to connect changes in these data to changes in cell functions because of complex ... [more ▼]

Omics experiments are ubiquitous in biological studies, leading to a deluge of data. However, it is still challenging to connect changes in these data to changes in cell functions because of complex interdependencies between genes, proteins, and metabolites. Here, we present a framework allowing researchers to infer how metabolic functions change on the basis of omics data. To enable this, we curated and standardized lists of metabolic tasks that mammalian cells can accomplish. Genome-scale metabolic networks were used to define gene sets associated with each metabolic task. We further developed a framework to overlay omics data on these sets and predict pathway usage for each metabolic task. We demonstrated how this approach can be used to quantify metabolic functions of diverse biological samples from the single cell to whole tissues and organs by using multiple transcriptomic datasets. To facilitate its adoption, we integrated the approach into GenePattern (www.genepattern.org-CellFie). [less ▲]

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See detailCommentaires de l'arrêt de la CJUE, Lintner aff. C-511/17, 3ème ch. 11 mars 2020
Poillot, Elise UL

in Picod, Fabrice (Ed.) Jurisprudence de la CJUE 2020 (2021)

Detailed reference viewed: 45 (0 UL)
See detailData protection in the context of covid-19. A short (hi)story of tracing applications.
Poillot, Elise UL; Lenzini, Gabriele UL; Resta, Giorgio et al

Book published by RomaTrE-Press (2021)

The volume presents the results of a research project (named “Legafight”) funded by the Luxembourg Fond National de la Recherche in order to verify if and how digital tracing applications could be ... [more ▼]

The volume presents the results of a research project (named “Legafight”) funded by the Luxembourg Fond National de la Recherche in order to verify if and how digital tracing applications could be implemented in the Grand-Duchy in order to counter and abate the Covid-19 pandemic. This inevitably brought to a deep comparative overview of the various existing various models, starting from that of the European Union and those put into practice by Belgium, France, Germany and Italy, with attention also to some Anglo-Saxon approaches (the UK and Australia). Not surprisingly the main issue which had to be tackled was that of the protection of the personal data collected through the tracing applications, their use by public health authorities and the trust laid in tracing procedures by citizens. Over the last 18 months tracing apps have registered a rise, a fall, and a sudden rebirth as mediums devoted not so much to collect data, but rather to distribute real time information which should allow informed decisions and be used as repositories of health certifications. [less ▲]

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See detailThe development of early visual-spatial abilities--considering effects of test mode
Meinhardt, A.; Braeuning, D.; Hasselhorn, M. et al

in Cognitive Development (2021), 60

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See detailEfficient Radar Imaging Using Partially Synchronized Distributed Sensors
Murtada, Ahmed Abdelnaser Elsayed UL; Hu, Ruizhi UL; Alaeekerahroodi, Mohammad UL et al

in 2021 IEEE Radar Conference (RadarConf21), Atlanta, GA, USA May 2021 (2021)

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See detailDéfinir le droit de la consommation : mission impossible ?”
Poillot, Elise UL; Zeno-Zencovich, Vincenzo

in Varii, Auctori (Ed.) Mélanges en l'honneur de Pascal Ancel (2021)

Detailed reference viewed: 49 (6 UL)
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See detailConcluding Remarks on the Legal Frameworks of Tracing Applications
Poillot, Elise UL

in Poillot, Elise; Lenzini, Gabriele; Resta, Giorgio (Eds.) et al Data Protection in the Context of Covid-19. A Short (Hi)story of Tracing Applications (2021)

Detailed reference viewed: 52 (0 UL)
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See detailLEARN Newsletter - Editioun 2021
Georges, Carrie UL; Hoffmann, Danielle UL; Hornung, Caroline UL et al

Book published by LEARN (2021)

Detailed reference viewed: 27 (0 UL)
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See detailLessons to be learnt from the crisis. The Rise and Fall (and Rise?) of Tracing Application
Poillot, Elise UL; Resta, Giorgio; Zeno-Zencovich, Vincenzo et al

in Poillot, Elise; Resta, Giorgio; Zeno-Zencovich, Vincenzo (Eds.) et al Data Protection in the Context of Covid-19. A Short (Hi)story of Tracing Applications (2021)

Detailed reference viewed: 34 (3 UL)