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See detailMultirotor Aerodynamic Effects in Aerial Manipulation
Sanchez Cuevas, Pedro Jesus UL; Heredia, Guillermo; Ollero, Anibal

in Multirotor Aerodynamic Effects in Aerial Manipulation (2019)

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See detailMonitoring & Profiling II (Advanced performance engineering)
Plugaru, Valentin UL; Besseron, Xavier UL

Presentation (2019, June 20)

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See detailDie Commons als Protest – zwischen Präsenz und Repräsentation
Becker, Katrin UL

Presentation (2019, June 07)

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See detailLa gouvernementalité algorithmique et la frontière
Becker, Katrin UL

Presentation (2019, June 05)

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See detailLike a Phoenix from the Ashes of Insolvency: An Appraisal of the Rescue Culture of the Kenyan Insolvency Act of 2015
Lichuma, Caroline Omari UL; Shako, Florence

in Kenya Law Review (2019), 7(1), 69-85

Before the commencement of the Insolvency Act of 2015, the statutory provisions regulating insolvency law in Kenya were found in the Companies Act, Cap 486 of the Laws of Kenya and the Bankruptcy Act, Cap ... [more ▼]

Before the commencement of the Insolvency Act of 2015, the statutory provisions regulating insolvency law in Kenya were found in the Companies Act, Cap 486 of the Laws of Kenya and the Bankruptcy Act, Cap 53 of the Laws of Kenya. The pertinent provisions of the former outlined the procedure to be followed in the event of corporate insolvency while the latter detailed the course of action to be followed in the event of personal insolvency, or bankruptcy as it is more commonly known. Despite the dissimilarities in the two regimes of insolvency law there was one crucial similarity between them, that is, neither the Bankruptcy Act nor the Companies Act espoused a rescue culture. An individual found to have committed “an act of bankruptcy” would be declared bankrupt by a court of competent jurisdiction and a corporate body would in most cases be wound up. It is for this reason that the insolvency laws in Kenya were for a long time referred to as the “Kiss of Death” Laws. This reality was articulated in Jambo Biscuits v. Barclays Bank (2002) where Justice Ringera stated, “I think it is notorious facts of which judicial notice may be taken that receiverships in this country have tended to give the kiss of death to many a business.” The Kenyan Insolvency Act of 2015 is closely modelled upon the UK Insolvency Act of 1986. This latter Act epitomizes the rescue culture. As elaborated upon by Lord Browne-Wilkinson the rescue culture seeks to preserve viable businesses and is fundamental to much of the Insolvency Act of 1986. This Act was the governmental response to the report and recommendations of a multi-disciplinary committee tasked with reviewing insolvency law and practice in the United Kingdom in the late 1970s. The Cork Committee laid the foundations for the so called rescue culture and argued that a good, modern system of insolvency law should provide a means for preserving viable commercial enterprises capable of making a useful contribution to the economic life of the country: “We believe that a concern for the livelihood and well-being of those dependent upon an enterprise which may well be the lifeblood of a whole town or even a region is a legitimate factor to which a modern law of insolvency must have regard. The chain reaction consequences upon any given failure can potentially be so disastrous to creditors, employees and the community that it must not be overlooked.” Rescue procedures are thus major interventions necessary to avert the eventual failure of a company. Central to the notion of rescue is, accordingly, the idea that drastic remedial action should be taken at a time of corporate crisis. This remedial action should take place ex ante as opposed to attempting to deal with the backlash that follows total corporate failure ex post facto. The term rescue culture has primarily been used in the context of corporate insolvency, but the present research will attempt to extend its use to personal insolvency specifically arguing that the various alternatives to bankruptcy do have the effect of rescuing an insolvent individual from otherwise imminent bankruptcy which has grim ramifications for persons adjudged bankrupt. This research will be divided into three subsequent parts. Part I will endeavor to summarize the roots of the current insolvency regime in Kenya, as well as examine the meaning of rescue culture together with its importance in any well-functioning insolvency regime. Part II will analyze the aspects of the Insolvency Act, 2015 that espouse a rescue culture for insolvent natural persons. Part III will analyze the rescue options for corporate bodies whose financial position is redeemable. The paper will end with a brief conclusion. [less ▲]

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See detailLes politiques budgétaires des États membres de la zone euro : nationales et communes
Allemand, Frederic UL

in Politeia (2019), (35), 149-166

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See detailThe rise of Public History: an international perspective
Cauvin, Thomas UL

in Revista NUPEM (2019), 11(23),

This article explores the birth and development of public history and presents the different criteria of its internationalization from the 1970s to the more recent creation of the International Federation ... [more ▼]

This article explores the birth and development of public history and presents the different criteria of its internationalization from the 1970s to the more recent creation of the International Federation of Public History. Based mostly on North America and Europe, the international perspective sets the development of public history in the United States into a broader context of debates about the changing role of historians. While public history was mostly perceived in the 1980s as the application – through consulting – of history to present - day issues, the more recent internationalization is made of a variety of local and national approaches to the field. [less ▲]

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See detailMeasuring Macroeconomic Tail Risk
Penasse, Julien UL

Presentation (2019, May 02)

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See detailARCH+
Hartbaum, Verena; Ngo, Anh-Linh; Trüby, Stephan et al

in Arch + (2019), 235

Geradezu seismografisch scheint die Architektur Entwicklungen vorwegzunehmen, die wir gemeinhin mit dem Erstarken der Neuen Rechten in den letzten Jahren in Verbindung bringen, die jedoch so neu nicht ist ... [more ▼]

Geradezu seismografisch scheint die Architektur Entwicklungen vorwegzunehmen, die wir gemeinhin mit dem Erstarken der Neuen Rechten in den letzten Jahren in Verbindung bringen, die jedoch so neu nicht ist, wie Stephan Trüby, der das Projekt „Rechte Räume“ initiiert hat, in seinem Grundlagenbeitrag herausarbeitet. Die architekturpolitische Ideologisierung mit der national­konservativen Wende der sogenannten ­Berlinischen Architektur, auf die ARCH+ bereits 1994 mit dem Heft Von Berlin nach Neuteutonia aufmerksam gemacht hat (siehe auch ARCH+ 219: Klaus Heinrich: Dahlemer Vorlesungen – Karl Friedrich Schinkel / Albert Speer, 2015), geht der neurechten Entwicklung in der Gesellschaft Jahrzehnte voraus. Neu ist an der Neuen Rechten allenfalls die strategische und qualitative Veränderung, die den Rechtsextremismus normalisiert. In ihrem Triumphzug führt die Neue Rechte als Beute die Baukultur als identitätspolitisches Programm mit. Damit dringt sie tief in die bürgerliche Mitte ein, schließlich ist niemand gleich rechts, nur weil er oder sie Rekonstruktionen schön findet. Deswegen war auch unser Aufruf zu einem Rekonstruktions-Watch im Sinne einer ideologischen Wachsamkeit gegenüber dem politischen Subtext solcher Projekte auf heftige Kritik gestoßen von Leuten, die sich nicht dem rechten Milieu zuordnen. Doch damit gehen sie den Rattenfängern auch schon auf dem Leim, die mit Begriffen wie „Schönheit“ und „europäische Stadt“ wirkungsvolle Nebelkerzen zünden. In diesem Zusammenhang wird deutlich, dass das nebulöse Label der europäischen Stadt von Anfang an anschlussfähig für das identitäre Programm der Neuen Rechten war. Was tun? Die Aufgabe ist es, mit Walter Benjamin gesprochen, „die Geschichte gegen den Strich zu bürsten.“ Das ist das Ziel dieser Ausgabe. [less ▲]

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See detailAutomated epileptic seizure detection based on break of excitation/inhibition balance
Fan, Xiaoya; Gaspard, Nicolas; Legros, Benjamin et al

in Computers in Biology and Medicine (2019)

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See detailDynamic Corporate Liquidity
Steri, Roberto UL; Nikolov, B.; Schmid, L.

in Journal of Financial Economics (2019), 132(1), 76-102

We examine the determinants of corporate liquidity management through the lens of an estimated dynamic model of corporate investment and financing. When external finance is costly, firms can absorb shocks ... [more ▼]

We examine the determinants of corporate liquidity management through the lens of an estimated dynamic model of corporate investment and financing. When external finance is costly, firms can absorb shocks and cover liquidity needs by holding cash and by drawing down credit lines. In contrast to cash, we model credit lines as providing liquidity contingent on economic news, but limited by collateral constraints and covenants. The option to draw down credit lines creates value as it allows firms to take advantage of investment opportunities in an effective way, facilitating firm growth. We find that our estimated model matches well the levels and joint dynamics of cash, credit lines, leverage, equity financing and investment when firms can collateralize roughly one third of their assets. In the cross-section, the model provides novel empirical predictions and rationalizes a wide range of stylized facts regarding credit line usage, covenant violations, and cash holdings. [less ▲]

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See detailEconomic Wrongs and Social Rights: Analyzing the Impact of Systemic Corruption on Realization of Economic and Social Rights in Kenya and the Potential Redress Offered by the Optional Protocol to the International Covenant on Economic, Social Rights and Cultural Rights
Lichuma, Caroline Omari UL

in The Transnational Human Rights Review (2019), 5

This paper analyzes how the existence of corruption and an ineffective anti-corruption ramework can be conceptualized as a violation of ESRs generally, and of specific ESRs particularly. The paper will ... [more ▼]

This paper analyzes how the existence of corruption and an ineffective anti-corruption ramework can be conceptualized as a violation of ESRs generally, and of specific ESRs particularly. The paper will then proceed to interrogate whether, if the failure of the government to combat corruption amounts to a breach of state obligations under the ICESCR, and whether there is any avenue for redress to victims at the international level. On 10 December 2008, coinciding with the 60th anniversary of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights, the United Nations General Assembly adopted the Optional Protocol to the International Covenant on Economic, Social and Cultural Rights (hereinafter, the OP-ICESCR12 This was a watershed moment in protecting the ESRs, as the Protocol injected much-needed optimism in the debate about the equal status of ESRs and the right of claimants to access justice. The OP-ICESCR came into force in May 2013 after the required number of state ratifications was obtained. I will argue in this paper that the OP-ICESCR could be harnessed as a useful instrument to hold governments such as the Government of Kenya to account, where they fail to properly address systemic corruption in their jurisdictions, because this has ramifications for realization of ESRs. [less ▲]

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See detailCognition in the fast lane: ravens’ gazes are half as short as humans’ when choosing objects
Bobrowicz, Katarzyna UL; Osvath, Mathias

in Animal Behavior and Cognition (2019)

Time cannot be directly perceived; instead, its flow is inferred from the influx of sensory information. To prevent sensory overload, attentional mechanisms split up information into processable units ... [more ▼]

Time cannot be directly perceived; instead, its flow is inferred from the influx of sensory information. To prevent sensory overload, attentional mechanisms split up information into processable units. This portioning remains imperceptible to the individual. However, the length of these units still influences the speed of perception and the speed at which behaviors are performed. Previous studies have focused on establishing the length of these units in various mammalian species – mainly humans – by measuring different types of behaviors, including gaze. However, no such studies have been conducted on birds. We measured duration of ravens’ (Corvus corax) single gazes towards selectable objects before a choice was made, and compared it with humans in a similar set up. The raven gaze durations were approximately half those of humans (which fell slightly short of previously established ranges). We hypothesize that these differences are mainly due to the much higher so-called flicker-fusion-frequency in birds, which makes their vision faster in the sense that it picks up more information per time unit than mammalian vision does. We further discuss that the speed of perception might influence the general speed of cognitive processing in more complex tasks as well, and suggest that the addition of a temporal component in comparative cognitive studies might be informative. [less ▲]

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See detailReligion(s) et violence
Weis, Monique UL

Speeches/Talks (2019)

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See detailUnderstanding Alpha Decay
Penasse, Julien UL

Scientific Conference (2019, March 12)

Detailed reference viewed: 15 (0 UL)