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See detailEditorial: Digital Innovation and Data-Driven Research in Neurodegenerative Diseases
Gu, Wei UL; Rong, Panying; Hofmann-Apitius, Martin et al

in Frontiers in Neurology (2022), 13

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See detailInsights from an information thermodynamics analysis of a synthetic molecular motor
Amano, Shuntaro; Esposito, Massimiliano UL; Kreidt, Elisabeth et al

in Nature Chemistry (2022), 14(5), 530-537

Information is physical, a realization that has transformed the physics of measurement and communication. However, the flow between information, energy and mechanics in chemical systems remains largely ... [more ▼]

Information is physical, a realization that has transformed the physics of measurement and communication. However, the flow between information, energy and mechanics in chemical systems remains largely unexplored. Here we analyse a minimalist autonomous chemically driven molecular motor in terms of information thermodynamics, a framework that quantitatively relates information to other thermodynamic parameters. The treatment reveals how directional motion is generated by free energy transfer from chemical to mechanical (conformational and/or co-conformational) processes by `energy flow' and `information flow'. It provides a thermodynamic level of understanding of molecular motors that is general, complements previous analyses based on kinetics and has practical implications for machine design. In line with kinetic analysis, we find that power strokes do not affect the directionality of chemically driven machines. However, we find that power strokes can modulate motor velocity, the efficiency of free energy transfer and the number of fuel molecules consumed per cycle. This may help explain the role of such (co-)conformational changes in biomachines and illustrates the interplay between energy and information in chemical systems. [less ▲]

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See detailRekruten für den Kaiser – Treverer im exercitus Romanus
Groff, Thierry UL

in Kolnberger, Thomas; Niederkorn, Benoît (Eds.) Militärgeschichte Luxemburgs. Grundzüge einer transnationalen Entwicklung von Militär, Krieg und Gesellschaft. (2022)

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See detailInschriften als Quelle für die römische Militärgeschichte
Groff, Thierry UL

in Kolnberger, Thomas; Niederkorn, Benoît (Eds.) Militärgeschichte Luxemburgs. Grundzüge einer transnationalen Entwicklung von Militär, Krieg und Gesellschaft. (2022)

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See detailThe impact of COVID-19 lockdown stringency on loneliness in five European countries
Caro, Juan Carlos; Clark, Andrew; d'Ambrosio, Conchita UL et al

in Social Science and Medicine (2022)

Rationale: The coronavirus pandemic has forced governments to implement a variety of different dynamic lockdown-stringency strategies in the last two years. Extensive lockdown periods could have potential ... [more ▼]

Rationale: The coronavirus pandemic has forced governments to implement a variety of different dynamic lockdown-stringency strategies in the last two years. Extensive lockdown periods could have potential unintended consequences on mental health, at least for at-risk groups. Objective: We present novel evidence on the heterogeneous direct and indirect effects of lockdown-stringency measures on individuals’ perception of social isolation (i.e. loneliness) using panel data from five European countries (Germany, France, Spain, Italy and Sweden), which tracks changes in both in-person and remote social interactions between May 2020 and March 2021. Method: We combine data from the COME-HERE panel survey (University of Luxembourg) and the Oxford COVID-19 Government Response Tracker (OxCGRT). We implement a dynamic mixture model in order to estimate the loneliness sub-population classes based on the severity of loneliness, as well as the evolution of social interactions. Results: While loneliness is remarkably persistent over time, we find substantial heterogeneity across individuals, identifying four latent groups by loneliness severity. Group membership probability varies with age, gender, education and cohabitation status. Moreover, we note significant differences in the impact of social interactions on loneliness by degree of severity. Older people are less likely to feel lonely, but were more affected by lockdown measures, partly due to a reduction in face-to-face interactions. On the contrary, the younger, especially those living alone, report high levels of loneliness that are largely unaffected by changes in the pandemic after lockdown measures were initially implemented. Conclusions: Understanding the heterogeneity in loneliness is key for the identification of at-risk populations that can be severely affected by extended lockdown measures. As part of public-health crisis-response systems, it is critical to develop support measures for older individuals living alone, as well as promoting continuous remote communication for individuals more likely to experience high levels of loneliness. [less ▲]

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See detailDefinition of Grief, Gender Differences and Religious and Cultural Differences in Dealing with Death and Grief
Skrozic, Amna UL; Kijamet, Dzenita UL

in Böhmer, Matthias; Steffgen, Georges (Eds.) Grief in schools - Basic knowledge and advice on dealing with dying and death (2022)

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See detailContrattazione collettiva e Gig Economy. Uno strumento tradizionale per nuovi modelli di organizzazione
Ratti, Luca UL; Loi, Piera; Miranda Boto, José Maria et al

Book published by Giappichelli (2022)

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See detailCombining Relaying and Reflective Surfaces: Power Consumption and Energy Efficiency Analysis
Abdullah, Zaid UL; Alexandropoulos, George C.; Kisseleff, Steven UL et al

in IEEE Global Communication Conference, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil (2022)

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See detailPersonalised meta-path generation for heterogeneous graph neural networks
Zhong, Zhiqiang; Li, Cheng-Te; Pang, Jun UL

in Data Mining and Knowledge Discovery (2022), 36(6), 2299-2333

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See detailHistorical Exposomics and High Resolution Mass Spectrometry
Aurich, Dagny UL; Miles, Owen; Schymanski, Emma UL

in Exposome (2021), 00(0),

Awareness of the exposome and its influence on health has increased in the last decade. As past exposures can cause changes in human health many years later, delving into the past is relevant for both ... [more ▼]

Awareness of the exposome and its influence on health has increased in the last decade. As past exposures can cause changes in human health many years later, delving into the past is relevant for both diagnostic and prevention purposes, but remains a challenging task. Lifestyle, diet, and socioeconomic information of the past should be well documented and compatible with modern data science methods. While chemical analysis nowadays makes use of high resolution mass spectrometry (HR-MS) for highly sensitive and comprehensive coverage of samples plus retrospective analysis, these data archives are in the very early stages. Since past measurements are often only available for a limited set of chemicals, adding to this knowledge requires careful selection of sample types and sampling sites, which may not always be available. The choice of analytes and analytical methods should be suitable for the study question —which is not always clear in advance in exposomics. Data interpretation and the use of appropriate databases are indispensable for a proper exposure assessment, and as databases and knowledge grow, re-analysis of physically or digitally archived samples could enable “continuous monitoring” efforts. This review focuses on the chemical analytical approaches necessary to capture the complexity of the historical exposome. Various sample types, analytes as well as analyses and data interpretation methods are discussed in relation to chemical exposures, while the connection to health remains in focus. It ends with perspectives and challenges in assessing the historical exposome, discussing how we can “learn from the past” to build a better future. [less ▲]

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See detailUne informalité bien ordonnée ? La conversation académique sur Twitter
Clavert, Frédéric UL; Muller, Caroline

in Tracés. Revue de sciences humaines. (2021), (#21), 65-84

Twitter and social media do not have a good reputation. However, this reputation does not correspond, or only partly corresponds, to the experience of many researchers. Based on a corpus of tweets, we ... [more ▼]

Twitter and social media do not have a good reputation. However, this reputation does not correspond, or only partly corresponds, to the experience of many researchers. Based on a corpus of tweets, we argue in this article that academic Twitter reflects the material conditions of research in France, allows for greater visibility of researchers and consequently for the formation of atypical networks that does not occur in the more traditional places of academic socialization, all in a form of a “well-ordered” informality, partly constrained by the hierarchies of higher education and research. [less ▲]

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