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See detailPeripheries at the Centre. Borderland Schooling in Interwar Europe.
Venken, Machteld UL

Book published by Berghahn (2021)

Following the Treaty of Versailles, European nation-states were faced with the challenge of instilling national loyalty in their new borderlands, in which fellow citizens often differed dramatically from ... [more ▼]

Following the Treaty of Versailles, European nation-states were faced with the challenge of instilling national loyalty in their new borderlands, in which fellow citizens often differed dramatically from one another along religious, linguistic, cultural, or ethnic lines. Peripheries at the Centre compares the experiences of schooling in Upper Silesia in Poland and Eupen, Sankt Vith, and Malmedy in Belgium — border regions detached from the German Empire after the First World War. It demonstrates how newly configured countries envisioned borderland schools and language learning as tools for realizing the imagined peaceful Europe that underscored the political geography of the interwar period. [less ▲]

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See detailLa réforme du droit belge des sociétés, un exemple à suivre pour le Luxembourg ?
Corbisier, Isabelle UL; Prüm, André UL

Book published by Larcier (2021)

Le nouveau Code des sociétés et des associations, introduit par le législateur belge en 2019 et applicable aux sociétés existantes depuis le 1er janvier 2020, est-il un exemple qui ferait sens au ... [more ▼]

Le nouveau Code des sociétés et des associations, introduit par le législateur belge en 2019 et applicable aux sociétés existantes depuis le 1er janvier 2020, est-il un exemple qui ferait sens au Luxembourg ? De par ses évolutions marquantes, ce nouveau code a rendu le droit belge des sociétés davantage fonctionnel, flexible et attractif. L’ouvrage rend compte des grands changements intervenus et les met en perspective avec le droit luxembourgeois. Y sont notamment abordées les questions relatives à la notion d’« entreprise » et ses conséquences, à l’abandon du siège réel comme critère de rattachement, au nouveau statut de la société à responsabilité limitée, aux nouvelles règles de gouvernance et à la libéralisation du régime des titres. L’ouvrage rassemble les contributions de : Alexia Autenne, Roman Aydogdu, Isabelle Corbisier, Henri Culot, Pierre-Alexandre Degehet, Michel de Wolf, Katia Gauzès, Philippe Hoss,Yann Paclot, Yann Payen, Denis Philippe, André Prüm, Pit Reckinger, Pierre Schleimer, Laurent Schummer, Jean-Paul Spang et Nicolas [less ▲]

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See detailDigitales Lesen im Deutschunterricht
Baumann, Isabell Eva UL

in PITT - Programm for innovative Teaching and Training (2021)

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See detailA cut finite element method for spatially resolved energy metabolism models in complex neuro-cell morphologies with minimal remeshing
Farina, Sofia UL; Claus, Susanne; Hale, Jack UL et al

in Advanced Modeling and Simulation in Engineering Sciences (2021)

A thorough understanding of brain metabolism is essential to tackle neurodegenerative diseases. Astrocytes are glial cells which play an important metabolic role by supplying neurons with energy. In ... [more ▼]

A thorough understanding of brain metabolism is essential to tackle neurodegenerative diseases. Astrocytes are glial cells which play an important metabolic role by supplying neurons with energy. In addition, astrocytes provide scaffolding and homeostatic functions to neighboring neurons and contribute to the blood–brain barrier. Recent investigations indicate that the complex morphology of astrocytes impacts upon their function and in particular the efficiency with which these cells metabolize nutrients and provide neurons with energy, but a systematic understanding is still elusive. Modelling and simulation represent an effective framework to address this challenge and to deepen our understanding of brain energy metabolism. This requires solving a set of metabolic partial differential equations on complex domains and remains a challenge. In this paper, we propose, test and verify a simple numerical method to solve a simplified model of metabolic pathways in astrocytes. The method can deal with arbitrarily complex cell morphologies and enables the rapid and simple modification of the model equations by users also without a deep knowledge in the numerical methods involved. The results obtained with the new method (CutFEM) are as accurate as the finite element method (FEM) whilst CutFEM disentangles the cell morphology from its discretisation, enabling us to deal with arbitrarily complex morphologies in two and three dimensions. [less ▲]

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See detailDie Wiedereinführung von EU-Binnengrenzkontrollen: ein unverhältnismäßiges, unwirksames und unzulässiges Mittel zur Bekämpfung der Pandemie
Gerkrath, Jörg UL

in Kritische Vierteljahresschrift für Gesetzgebung und Rechtswissenschaft (2021)

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See detailWho aspires to higher education? Axes of inequality, values of education and higher education aspirations in secondary schools in Luxembourg and the Swiss Canton of Bern
Hadjar, Andreas UL; Scharf, Jan; Hascher, Tina

in European Journal of Education (2021), 56(1), 9-26

This article reports a study that investigated secondary school students’ higher education aspirations (towards university studies, ISCED 6 and above) and how these differ between student groups as well ... [more ▼]

This article reports a study that investigated secondary school students’ higher education aspirations (towards university studies, ISCED 6 and above) and how these differ between student groups as well as how these are impacted by values of education. Panel data of more than 300 secondary school students in two countries, Luxembourg and Switzerland (the Swiss Canton of Bern) was analysed. Schools are structured differently in the education systems of Luxembourg and the Swiss Canton of Bern. The results of our analysis show that students in the Luxembourgish sample more often aspire to higher education than in the Swiss sample. Disparities in higher education aspirations were also more pronounced in the Luxembourgish sample, boys and students from families of low socio-economic status (SES) were less likely to aspire to higher education. While the effects of values of education are generally scarce, stimulation in terms of anticipated enjoyment and interest derived from participation in higher education seems to have a positive effect on higher education aspirations. [less ▲]

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See detailFake news sur l'architecture eschoise
Scuto, Denis UL

Article for general public (2021)

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See detailTRANSLA results 2019-2020
Aleksic, Gabrijela UL; Bebić, Džoen Dominique UL

Presentation (2021, February 26)

This was a teacher-parent Conference in which we presented the results on the effects of the translanguaging training for teachers on their pedagogy, home-school collaboration, and children's well being ... [more ▼]

This was a teacher-parent Conference in which we presented the results on the effects of the translanguaging training for teachers on their pedagogy, home-school collaboration, and children's well being. We presented the results gathered from teacher questionnaires, focus groups, and interviews with the teachers, questionnaires and interviews with the parents, and literacy and numeracy tests and video observations with the children. We found positive effects and shared it with parents and teachers. [less ▲]

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See detailDeliberative constitution-making in Luxembourg
Burks, Deven UL; Kies, Raphaël UL

Scientific Conference (2021, February 26)

Luxembourg is a small constitutional monarchy and parliamentary democracy. Since its 1868 ratification, the Constitution of Luxembourg has been amended 35 times, so the document resembles more and more a ... [more ▼]

Luxembourg is a small constitutional monarchy and parliamentary democracy. Since its 1868 ratification, the Constitution of Luxembourg has been amended 35 times, so the document resembles more and more a patchwork quilt of basic institutions. Yet the past twenty years have seen a consensus amongst Luxembourg’s constitutional players on the need for modernization, motivated by the desire for a more coherent constitution. Article 114 vests the Chamber of Deputies with the power to initiate and to approve constitutional amendments in a two-step process. This has several consequences for deliberation. First, it is largely restricted to political elites because formal amendment powers rest solely with the Chamber. Second, there is little to no empowered maxi-public deliberation unless the Government supports a citizen consultation. Following the 2013 parliamentary elections, the new Government planned a two-part referendum on constitutional reform in summer 2015 and in winter 2015. The first referendum was intended to seek popular input on four proposals which voters rejected by large margins, and the second referendum was later scrapped. Nevertheless, this reform process has seen some participatory and deliberative experiments. For the purposes of the present COST Action, three events are of interest. First, charged by the Chamber of Deputies, the UL’s Parliamentary Studies Research Chair at organized in May 2014 CIVILEX, a citizens’ forum modelled along the lines of a 21st century Town Meeting to discuss each of the four referendum questions. Researchers found that group discussion sometimes produced significant shifts in opinion between the pre- and post-deliberation questionnaires. Furthermore, once experts had cleared up certain misunderstandings, citizens ably discussed the referendum proposals. Despite these largely positive experiences, this deliberative experiment remained an isolated experiment and was not renewed during the campaign leading up to the June 2015 referendum. Second, given the first referendum results, the Chamber made a renewed effort in 2015 to involve citizens in the constitutional reform process, so it collected proposals via a new web portal - www.ärvirschléi.lu (Your Recommendation) – and subsequently held a public hearing with those who had initiated proposals. The process yielded some participatory and deliberative outcomes, including the elaboration of several constitutional amendments. For instance, Chamber members reached consensus on strengthening the rights of children and of animals compared to their original text. Nevertheless, the webportal was not developed as an online deliberative forum and saw limited, self-selected participation. Consequently, though this was the only concrete involvement of citizens in the constitutional reform, it was the least deliberative of the three exercises. Third, since the Government had still planned to call a second referendum to vote on the constitutional reform as a whole, the Chamber again tasked the Chair with gauging public opinion. So, in July 2016, the Chaire organized CONSTITULUX, a new citizens’ forum to discuss the entire draft constitution. Citizens i.) raised pertinent questions, ii.) identified short- and long-term concerns and iii.) suggested improvements to the draft articles. One striking output was that participants were more supportive of the proposed constitutional reform. Like CIVILEX, it generated little concrete action from the Government. Moreover, the incidental and experimental nature of these events again meant that there was little maxi-public engagement. Following the draft constitution’s abandonment in November 2019, it remains to be seen what the future holds for deliberative democracy and constitution-making in Luxembourg. [less ▲]

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See detailIst die Künstliche Intelligenz für oder gegen die Menschheit?
Schommer, Christoph UL

Speeches/Talks (2021)

La Commission Luxembourgeoise pour la coopération avec l’UNESCO et la Bibliothèque nationale du Luxembourg invitent à leur cycle de conférences dans le cadre des « Rendez-Vous de l’UNESCO ». Le thème ... [more ▼]

La Commission Luxembourgeoise pour la coopération avec l’UNESCO et la Bibliothèque nationale du Luxembourg invitent à leur cycle de conférences dans le cadre des « Rendez-Vous de l’UNESCO ». Le thème central du cycle est cette année : « Mankind and Media. Rethinking the Roles in the Age of Information » Les dernières années ont en outre montré clairement qu’on est fortement dépendant de la transmission des informations vite et performante : on demande toujours plus de données, plus d’informations, plus de connectivité. Mais peut-on conserver une vue d’ensemble dans ce flux d’information hyperrapide ? Peut-on encore contrôler la transformation des informations par les médias numériques ? Où en est l’humain devant l’évolution exponentielle des technologies, de l’intelligence artificielle et du commerce de nos données ? Qui reste à l’origine de l’information et qui comment nous l’interprétons ? Les conférences traitent cette thématique en différentes perspectives. Le 25 février, Prof. Dr. Christoph Schommer de l’Université du Luxembourg fera l’ouverture en posant la question : L’intelligence Artificielle? Où en sommes-nous ? Il abordera les possibilités, chances et risques de ces nouvelles technologies. 4 journalistes se réuniront le 22 avril et discuteront, animés par Josée Hansen, la transmission d’informations et l’objectivité dans le temps des « Fake News » et du « Click Bait ». Dr. Manuela di Franco nous introduira le 1er juillet dans le monde des dessins animés et se penchera sur leur rôle dans la transmission des messages subliminaux et propagandistes. Ian di Toffoli et Prof. Dr. Lukas K. Sosoe s’entretiendront le 30 septembre sur les problèmes et limites de l’éthique dans le monde digital. Qu’il ne faut pas oublier l’art dans la transmission des messages nous rappelleront les 4 artistes qui poursuivront le 2nd décembre, dans la dernière table ronde de ce cycle modérée par Dr. Nora Schleich, le rôle de la liberté artistique face à la libre expression des opinions. Que peut et même doit faire l’art ? La Bibliothèque nationale du Luxembourg aménagera pour chacune de ces soirées, qui auront lieu toujours jeudi à 19hrs, une salle assez grande pour assurer la réunion en présence physique et, le cas échéant, en respect des restrictions actuelles. 25.02.2021 Der Mensch und die Künstliche Intelligenz. Wo stehen wir? (DE) Un entretien avec Prof. Christoph Schommer, modéré par Dr. Nora Schleich, traduit en anglais 22.04.2021 Mediepluralismus – Eng Garantie fir Demokratie am 21. Joerhonnert? (LU) Une table-ronde avec François Aulner, Pia Oppel, Christoph Bumb et Jean-Louis Siweck, modérée par Josée Hansen 01.07.2021 Transmission of Information via Specific Media – Propagandistic Messages in Comics (EN) Une présentation de Dr. Manuela di Franco, traduit en français 30.09.2021 L’Ethique dans la société de l’Information (FR) Un discours avec Prof. Lukas Sosoe, modéré par Ian de Toffoli, traduit en anglais 02.12.2021 Artistesch Fräiheet a Meenungsfräiheet (LU) Une table-ronde avec Justine Blau, Dr. Cédric Kayer, Filip Markiewicz et Anne Simon., modérée par Dr. Nora Schleich Comme les places sont limitées, il faudra s’inscrire au plus tard trois jours avant la conférence en envoyant un courriel à : reservation@bnl.etat.lu Pour plus d’informations, veuillez accéder le site internet : www.unesco.lu; www.bnl.lu [less ▲]

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See detailInnovative Models of Governance
Schafer, Valerie UL; Wieneke, Lars UL

Presentation (2021, February 24)

Over the course of three days (24–26 February 2021) we hold two panels a day, during which the research team of OPERAS-P (WG 6) presented their findings to gather feedback from invited experts and the ... [more ▼]

Over the course of three days (24–26 February 2021) we hold two panels a day, during which the research team of OPERAS-P (WG 6) presented their findings to gather feedback from invited experts and the audience. The different panels addressed specific scholarly communication topics: innovative governance models in social sciences and humanities (SSH), business models for open access books, multilingualism and bibliodiversity in SSH, opportunities and challenges of FAIRification of SSH data, the future of scholarly writing, and quality assessment of novel research and innovative publications in the SSH research. Wednesday, 24 February 2021 10:00–11:30 CET Innovative models of governance The discussion focused on a critical review of modes of governance in distributed organisations and in the digital area, and recommendations for a governance model that can help manage smoothly the wide diversity of cultural backgrounds, expertise, level of commitment within its community, which is typical of SSH communities. Coordinator: Valérie Schafer (C2DH, University of Luxembourg), Lars Wieneke (C2DH, University of Luxembourg) Panelists: Lionel Maurel (INSHS, CNRS), Francesca Musiani (The Center for Internet and Society, CNRS), Jane Winters (University of London) [less ▲]

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See detailWriting the Contemporary History of Europe: Old Concepts, New Tools?
Danescu, Elena UL; Itzel, Constanze; Douglas, McCarthy et al

Speeches/Talks (2021)

Although the idea of Europe dates back to ancient times and was crystallised in the Enlightenment, the plan for European unification emerged in the second half of the 20th century as a consequence of an ... [more ▼]

Although the idea of Europe dates back to ancient times and was crystallised in the Enlightenment, the plan for European unification emerged in the second half of the 20th century as a consequence of an economic process based on a single market and a single currency. European integration is therefore a recent chapter in the history of Europe, one which has been written before our very eyes, but it remains fragmented into disparate national histories. In the 21st century, those writing the history of Europe find themselves confronted with a threefold challenge: they must meet the demands of the digital age, adjust to the paradigm shift within the historical discipline and navigate the geopolitical upheavals that the continent has been experiencing since 1989 (the fall of communism; the enlargement of the European Union; the many crises the EU has faced, including Brexit; the divide between institutions and citizens; the socio-economic consequences of the global crisis, including the COVID-19 health crisis; the new nature of transatlantic relations, etc.). [less ▲]

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Peer Reviewed
See detailGreyson, Auguste
Duhr, Marlène UL; Anders, Ursula UL; Reuter, Caroline

in Sagrillo, Damien François; Anders, Ursula; Nitschke, Alain Roland (Eds.) et al Luxemburger Musiklexikon Online. Komponisten und Interpreten Band I: 1815-1950. Basierend auf der 2. erweiterten Auflage, 2016 (2021)

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See detailImportance marking in EMI lectures: A comparative study
Deroey, Katrien UL; Johnson, Jane Helen

Presentation (2021, February 23)

In this presentation we focus on how lecturers mark important information in their lectures. Being able to identify important information is fundamental to the learning process (Benson, 1989, p. 437), and ... [more ▼]

In this presentation we focus on how lecturers mark important information in their lectures. Being able to identify important information is fundamental to the learning process (Benson, 1989, p. 437), and the different levels of information in a lecture may be highlighted through a careful choice of language, including explicit macro markers (Chaudron & Richards, 1986; Allison & Tauroza, 1995; Jung, 2003; Titsworth & Kiewra, 2004). Previous research has focussed particularly on importance markers in native speaking (NS) lecturer discourse (e.g. Crawford Camiciottoli 2004; Deroey & Taverniers 2011, 2012; Deroey 2012, 2014, 2015). Our study expands this research to compare the use of lexicogrammatical importance markers in both NS and non-native speaker (NNS) lectures. A specially compiled corpus of about 365,000 words of Physical Science lectures was used in our study, featuring a balanced number of words from lectures in Italy (Johnson & Picciuolo, 2020; Picciuolo & Johnson, 2020) as well as in New Zealand, the UK and Malaysia (‘Engineering Lecture Corpus’ ). A qualitative analysis was done to annotate all instances of markers evaluating the importance of lecture content. These included verb, adjective or noun phrases containing an evaluation of importance. Assessment-related expressions were also marked. 378 separate instances were identified. More delicate analysis of the importance-marking phrases was done, with distributions and variations in frequent patterns identified in both NS and NNS lectures. While Verb phrases were found to be the most frequent in both NS and NNS lectures (62%), there was variation in the type of Verb patterns according to NS and NNS, as well as in verb choice. In general, though importance markers were distributed evenly over NS (=191) and NNS (=187) lectures, NS showed more variety than NNS in the type of pattern used, with adjective, metanoun and assessment-related expressions as well as idiomatic expressions figuring more frequently than in NNS, although there were significant differences also within the NS and NNS sub-corpora themselves. Whether these findings show that NNS are more aware of the risks of misunderstanding among their international student audiences (House, 2003; Mauranen, 2006), and thus use a smaller variety of less ambiguous importance markers, or that NNS have fewer language resources to draw on in the first place, awareness-raising among EMI lecturers is vital when preparing teacher training materials, given the expansion of ELF in international academic contexts where both lecturers and students are non-native speakers. References Allison, D., & Tauroza S. (1995). The effect of discourse organisation on lecture comprehension. English for Specific Purposes 14: 157-173. Benson, M.J. (1989). The Academic Listening Task: a case study. TESOL quarterly, vol. 23(3) 421-445. Chaudron, C., & Richards J. C. (1986). The effect of discourse markers on the comprehension of lectures. Applied Linguistics, vol. 7 (2) 113-127. Crawford Camiciottoli, B. (2004). Audience-oriented relevance markers in business studies lectures. In Del Lungo Camiciotti, G. & Tognini Bonelli, E. (Eds.), Academic Discourse: New Insights into Evaluation. Peter Lang, pp. 81–98. Deroey, K. L. B. (2012). What they highlight is: the discourse functions of basic wh-clefts in lectures. Journal of English for Academic Purposes 11/2: 112–24. Deroey, K.L.B. (2014). ‘Anyway, the point I'm making is': lexicogrammatical relevance marking in lectures. In Vandelanotte L., Kristin, D. Caroline G. & Ditte K. (Eds.), Recent advances in Corpus Linguistics: Developing and exploiting corpora, Amsterdam/New York, Rodopi, 265-291. Deroey, K. L. B. (2015) Marking importance in lectures: Interactive and Textual Orientation. Applied Linguistics 2015: 36/1: 51-72. Deroey, K. L. B., & Taverniers, M. (2011). A corpus-based study of lecture functions. Moderna Sprak 105/2: 1–22. Deroey, K. L. B., & Taverniers, M. (2012). Just remember this: Lexicogrammatical relevance markers in lectures. English for Specific Purposes. 31 (4) 221-233. House, J. (2003). Misunderstanding in intercultural university encounters. In House J., Kasper G and Ross S. (Eds.), Misunderstanding in social life: discourse approaches to problematic talk, London: Longman, 22-56. Johnson, J. H., & Picciuolo, M. (2020). Interaction in spoken academic discourse in an EMI context: the use of questions. Conference proceedings of the Congress UPV 6th International Conference on Higher Education Advances (HEAd’20) Domenech, J., Merello, P., de la Poza, E. & Peña-Ortiz, R. (Eds.), Editorial Universitat Politècnica de València, pp. 211-219. Mauranen, A. (2006). Signalling and preventing misunderstanding in English as a lingua franca communication. International Journal of the Sociology of Language, 177: 123-150. Picciuolo, M., & Johnson, J. H. (2020). Contrasting EMI lecturers’ perceptions with practices at the University of Bologna. In Miller, D.R. (Ed.), Quaderni del CeSLiC. Occasional papers. Bologna: Centro di Studi Linguistico-Culturali (CeSLiC), Università di Bologna. AlmaDL, p. 23. http://amsacta.unibo.it/6399/ Titsworth, S. B., & Kiewra, K.A. (2004). Spoken organizational lecture cues and student notetaking as facilitators of student learning. Contemporary Educational Psychology 29: 447-461. [less ▲]

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