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See detailThe Gateway Science: A Review of Astronomy in the OECD School Curricula
Salimpoura, Saeed; Bartlett, Sophie; Fitzgerald, Michael T. et al

in Research in Science Education (in press)

Astronomy is considered by many to be a gateway science owing to its ability to inspire curiosity in everyone irrespective of age, culture or general inclination to science. While the inclusion of ... [more ▼]

Astronomy is considered by many to be a gateway science owing to its ability to inspire curiosity in everyone irrespective of age, culture or general inclination to science. While the inclusion of astronomy in the school curriculum has waxed and waned over the years, in the current era, where there is a global push to get more students engaged in Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM), astronomy provides an invaluable conduit to bring about this shift. This paper highlights the results of a study which has reviewed the presence and extent to which astronomy has been incorporated into the school curriculum of the Organisation for Economic and Cooperative Development (OECD) member countries as well as two non-OECD countries strong in astronomy research, China and South Africa, and one international curriculum, the International Baccalaureate Diploma programme. A total of 52 national curricula from 37 countries were reviewed. The results revealed that overall astronomy and its related topics are prevalent in at least one grade in all curricula across the OECD, China and South Africa. Of the 52 national curricula, 44 of them had astronomy related topics in grade 6. Out of the 52 national curricula, 40 introduced astronomy-related topics in grade 1, while 14 of them had astronomy-related topics explicitly mentioned in all grades. The most common keywords were related to basic astronomy concepts, such as the Earth, the Sun, the Moon, and the stars, all have occurrences of over 100. Relational textual analysis also revealed that all the major concepts could be encompassed across two broad themes of Earth and Physics. [less ▲]

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See detailKilling Stubborn Mutants with Symbolic Execution
Titcheu Chekam, Thierry UL; Papadakis, Mike UL; Cordy, Maxime UL et al

in ACM Transactions on Software Engineering and Methodology (in press)

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See detailTest Selection for Deep Learning Systems
Ma, Wei UL; Papadakis, Mike UL; Tsakmalis, Anestis et al

in ACM Transactions on Software Engineering and Methodology (in press)

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See detailLa Charte dans l'action extérieure de l'Union européenne
Neframi, Eleftheria UL

in Iliopoulou Penot, Anastasia; Xenou, Lamprini (Eds.) La Charte des droits fondamentaux de l'UE (in press)

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See detailThe effects of age stereotypes on physical and mental health are mediated by self-perceptions of aging
Brothers, Allyson; Kornadt, Anna Elena UL; Nehrkorn-Bailey, Abigail et al

in Journals of Gerontology. Series B, Psychological Sciences and Social Sciences (in press)

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See detailDon't Trust Me, Test Me: 100% Code Coverage for a 3rd-party Android App
Pilgun, Aleksandr UL

in Pilgun, Aleksandr (Ed.) Don't Trust Me, Test Me: 100% Code Coverage for a 3rd-party Android App (in press)

The incompleteness of 3rd-party app testing is an accepted fact in Software Engineering. This issue makes it impossible to verify the app functionality and to confirm its safety to the end-user. To solve ... [more ▼]

The incompleteness of 3rd-party app testing is an accepted fact in Software Engineering. This issue makes it impossible to verify the app functionality and to confirm its safety to the end-user. To solve this problem, enterprises developed strict policies. A company, willing to use modern apps, may perform an expensive security analysis, rely on trust or forbid the app. These strategies may lead companies to high direct and indirect spending with no guarantee of safety. In this work, we present a novel approach, called Dynamic Binary Shrinking, that allows a user to review app functionality and leave only tested code. The shrunk app produces 100% instruction coverage on observed behaviors and in this way guarantees the absence of unexplored, and therefore, potentially malicious code. On our running examples, we demonstrate that apps use less than 20% of the codebase. We developed an approach and the ACVCut tool to shrink Android apps towards the executed code. Repository — http://github.com/pilgun/acvcut. [less ▲]

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See detailInternationales und Europäisches Steuerrecht
Sinnig, Julia UL

in Taeger, Jürgen; Pohle, Jan; Kilian, Wolfgang (Eds.) et al Computerrechts-Handbuch - Informationstechnologie in der Rechts- und Wirtschaftspraxi (in press)

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See detailMedia Technologies for a Better World: UNESCO’s Ethical Framework for Communication Infrastructures and Uses of Media after the Second World War
Priem, Karin UL; Sengsavang, Eng

in Atanasiu, Vlad; Chachereau, Nicolas; Sibille, Christiane (Eds.) Framing Innovation (in press)

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See detailVisual Presence and Interpretation: Two Dimensions of the Fight Against Illiteracy in Texts by Carlo Levi and Photographs by David Seymour (1950)
Priem, Karin UL

in Comas Rubí, Francisca; Priem, Karin; González Gómez, Sara (Eds.) Media Matter: Images as Presenters, Mediators, and Means of Observation (in press)

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See detailMedia Matter: Introduction
Comas Rubí, Francisca; Priem, Karin UL; González Gómez, Sara

in Comas Rubí, Francisca; Priem, Karin; González Gómez, Sara (Eds.) Media Matter: Images as Presenters, Mediators, and Means of Observation (in press)

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See detailMedia Matter: Images as Presenters, Mediators, and Means of Observation
Comas Rubí, Francisca; Priem, Karin UL; González Gómez, Sara

Book published by De Gruyter (in press)

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See detailSoziale Arbeit in der Inklusionsfalle. Terminologische Unbestimmtheit, ethischer Anspruch und neoliberale Wendung.
Limbach-Reich, Arthur UL

in Bütow, Birgit; Holztrattner, Melanie; Raithelhuber, Eberhard (Eds.) (Des-)Organisation und (Ent-)Institutionalisierung in der Sozialen Arbeit. (in press)

The analysis of the concept of inclusion in a scientific context and the inflationary classification of different practices as inclusive suggest a rethinking of inclusion as a guiding concept in social ... [more ▼]

The analysis of the concept of inclusion in a scientific context and the inflationary classification of different practices as inclusive suggest a rethinking of inclusion as a guiding concept in social work. Inclusion in the sociological sense means something other than the pedagogical postulate of education for all. Inclusion is sometimes understood as a method (inclusive education), sometimes as an ethical principle (human right) and sometimes as a global goal (the inclusive society). In the neoliberal model, inclusion represents a practice of obligation to contribute to economic growth and to comply with market requirements. Due to its proximity to the everyday life of the people, social work has a growing role to play in pointing out the tension between an inclusion promise in the front stage and a back stage on which social exclusion is legitimised. [less ▲]

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See detailHumanitarian Photography Beyond the Picture: David “CHIM” Seymour’s Children of Europe
Priem, Karin UL; Herman, Frederik

in Allender, Tim; Dussel, Inés; Grosvenor, Ian (Eds.) et al Appearances Matter: The Visual in Educational History (in press)

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See detailChallenges and Methodologies in the Visual History of Education
Allender, Tim; Dussel, Inés; Grosvenor, Ian et al

in Allender, Tim; Dussel, Inés; Grosvenor, Ian (Eds.) et al Appearances Matter: The Visual in Educational History (in press)

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See detailAppearances Matter: The Visual in Educational History
Allender, Tim; Dussel, Inés; Grosvenor, Ian et al

Book published by De Gruyter - Appearances: Studies in Visual Research (in press)

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See detailSocietal Emotional Environments and Cross-Cultural Differences in Life Satisfaction: A Forty-Nine Country Study
Krys, Kuba; Yeung, June; Capaldi, Colin et al

in Journal of Positive Psychology (in press)

In this paper, we introduce the concept of ‘societal emotional environment’: the emotional climate of a society (operationalized as the degree to which positive and negative emotions are expressed in a ... [more ▼]

In this paper, we introduce the concept of ‘societal emotional environment’: the emotional climate of a society (operationalized as the degree to which positive and negative emotions are expressed in a society). Using data collected from 12,888 participants across 49 countries, we show how societal emotional environments vary across countries and cultural clusters, and we consider the potential importance of these differences for well-being. Multilevel analyses supported a ‘double-edged sword’ model of negative emotion expression, where expression of negative emotions predicted higher life satisfaction for the expresser but lower life satisfaction for society. In contrast, partial support was found for higher societal life satisfaction in positive societal emotional environments. Our study highlights the potential utility and importance of distinguishing between positive and negative emotion expression, and adopting both individual and societal perspectives in well-being research. Individual pathways to happiness may not necessarily promote the happiness of others. [less ▲]

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See detailInvariant density adaptive estimation for ergodic jump diffusion processes over anisotropic classes
Amorino, Chiara UL; Gloter, Arnaud

in Journal of Statistical Planning and Inference (in press)

We consider the solution of a multivariate stochastic differential equation with Levy-type jumps and with unique invariant probability measure with density μ. We assume that a continuous record of ... [more ▼]

We consider the solution of a multivariate stochastic differential equation with Levy-type jumps and with unique invariant probability measure with density μ. We assume that a continuous record of observations is available. In the case without jumps, Reiss and Dalalyan [7] and Strauch [24] have found convergence rates of invariant density estimators, under respectively isotropic and anisotropic H ̈older smoothness constraints, which are considerably faster than those known from standard multivariate density estimation. We extend the previous works by obtaining, in presence of jumps, some estimators which have the same convergence rates they had in the case without jumps for d ≥ 2 and a rate which depends on the degree of the jumps in the one-dimensional setting. We propose moreover a data driven bandwidth selection procedure based on the Goldenshluger and Lepski method [11] which leads us to an adaptive non-parametric kernel estimator of the stationary density μ of the jump diffusion X. [less ▲]

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See detailInteroception, stress and physical symptoms in stress-associated diseases
Schulz, André UL; Schultchen, Dana; Vögele, Claus UL

in European Journal of Health Psychology (in press)

The brain and peripheral bodily organs continuously exchange information. Exemplary, interoception refers to the processing and perception of ascending information from the body to the brain. Stress ... [more ▼]

The brain and peripheral bodily organs continuously exchange information. Exemplary, interoception refers to the processing and perception of ascending information from the body to the brain. Stress responses involve a neurobehavioral cascade, which includes the activation of peripheral organs via neural and endocrine pathways and can thus be seen as an example for descending information on the brain-body axis. Hence, the interaction of interoception and stress represents bi-directional communication on the brain-body axis. The main hypothesis underlying this review is that the dysregulation of brain-body communication represents an important mechanism for the generation of physical symptoms in stress-related disorders. The aims of this review are, therefore, (1.) to summarize current knowledge on acute stress effects on different stages of interoceptive signal processing, (2.) to discuss possible patterns of abnormal brainbody communication (i.e., alterations in interoception and physiological stress axes activation) in mental disorders and chronic physical conditions, and (3.) to consider possible approaches to modify interoception. Due to the regulatory feedback loops underlying brain-body communication, the modification of interoceptive processes (ascending signals) may, in turn, affect physiological stress axes activity (descending signals), and, ultimately, also physical symptoms. [less ▲]

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See detailMediating the Right to Education: An Analysis of UNESCO’s Exhibition Album on Human Rights and Its Global Dissemination in 1951
Kesteloot, Stefanie UL

in Priem, Karin; Comas Rubi, Francisca; Gonzalez, Sara (Eds.) Media Matter: Images as Presenters, Mediators and Means of Observation (in press)

The end of the Second World War was the start of a new era, with worldwide support for a Universal Declaration of Human Rights (UDHR). As a UN organisation, UNESCO was assigned to present the UDHR towards ... [more ▼]

The end of the Second World War was the start of a new era, with worldwide support for a Universal Declaration of Human Rights (UDHR). As a UN organisation, UNESCO was assigned to present the UDHR towards the global population in an effort to guide them to peace. In 1949, their Department of Mass Communication created three tools to promote human rights: a large-scale exhibition at the Musée Galliera in Paris, a travel album, and teaching handbooks. In my chapter, I will focus on the travel album, and in particular, on article 26: “The Right to Education”. As in the album, the right is represented by a number of images and captions, all related to this article of the UDHR. I will analyse the visuals and the corresponding texts from an intermediate perspective. Does the narrative created by UNESCO actually relate to the meaning of the pictures? Then, I will analyse the global correspondence received on the travel album. How did the viewers understand the album and was it as comprehensible as UNESCO thought? This chapter argues that the promotion and mediation of human rights were based on Western standards of education, making it difficult to spread a universal message. [less ▲]

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See detailBetween national language traditions and transnational competence: teaching multilingual academic discourse at the University of Luxembourg
Huemer, Birgit UL

in Donahue, Christiane (Ed.) Teaching and Studying Transnational Composition (in press)

Detailed reference viewed: 31 (5 UL)