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See detailEléonora Miano et son concept de l´identité frontière au théâtre
Nonoa, Koku Gnatuloma UL

in Borst, Julia; Neu-Wendel, Stephanie; Tauchnitz, Juliane (Eds.) et al Unerhörte Stimmen aus der Afro-Romania Genderdiskurse im Kontext von Selbst- und Fremdwahrnehmung „nach“ der Migration (in press)

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See detailReconceptualizing the Multilingual Child: Curriculum Construction in Luxembourg
Sattler, Sabrina UL

in Curriculum Studies Worldwide (in press)

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See detailExtending maps to profinite completions in finitely generated quasivarieties
Teheux, Bruno UL; Hansoul, Georges

in Beiträge zur Algebra und Geometrie (in press)

We consider the problem of extending maps from algebras to their profinite completions in finitely generated quasivarieties. Our developments are based on the construction of the profinite completion of ... [more ▼]

We consider the problem of extending maps from algebras to their profinite completions in finitely generated quasivarieties. Our developments are based on the construction of the profinite completion of an algebra as its natural extension. We provide an extension which is a multi-map and we study its continuity properties, and the conditions under which it is a map. [less ▲]

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See detailLocal Verlet buffer approach for broad-phase interaction detection in Discrete Element Method
Mainassara Chekaraou, Abdoul Wahid UL; Besseron, Xavier UL; Rousset, Alban UL et al

in Computer Physics Communications (in press)

The Extended Discrete Element Method (XDEM) is a novel and innovative numerical simulation technique that extends the dynamics of granular materials or particles as described through the classical ... [more ▼]

The Extended Discrete Element Method (XDEM) is a novel and innovative numerical simulation technique that extends the dynamics of granular materials or particles as described through the classical discrete element method (DEM) by additional properties such as the thermodynamic state, stress/strain for each particle. Such DEM simulations used by industries to set up their experimental processes are complexes and heavy in computation time. Those simulations perform at each time step a collision detection to generate a list of interacting particles that is one of the most expensive computation parts of a DEM simulation. The Verlet buffer method, which was first introduced in Molecular Dynamic (MD) (and is also used in DEM) allows to keep the interaction list for many time step by extending each particle neighborhood by a certain extension range, and thus broadening the interaction list. The method relies mainly on the stability of the DEM, which ensures that no particles move erratically or unpredictably from one time step to the next: this is called temporal coherency. In the classical and current approach, all the particles have their neighborhood extended by the same value which leads to suboptimal performances in simulations where different flow regimes coexist. Additionally, and unlike in MD (which remains very different from DEM on several aspects), there is no comprehensive study analyzing the different parameters that affect the performance of the Verlet buffer method in DEM. In this work, we apply a dynamic neighbor list update method that depends on the particles' individual displacement, and an extension range specific to each particle and based on their local flow regime for the generation of the neighbor list. The update of the interaction list is analyzed throughout the simulation based on the displacement of the particle allowing a flexible update according to the flow regime conditions. We evaluate the influence of the Verlet extension range on the performance of the execution time through different test cases and we empirically analyze and define the extension range value giving the minimum of the global simulation time. [less ▲]

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See detail"Aktion 18 und Quiz 3000"
Nonoa, Koku Gnatuloma UL

in Kovacs, Teresa; Scheinpflug, Peter; Wortmann, Thomas (Eds.) Schlingensief-Handbuch Leben – Werk – Wirkung (in press)

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See detailBrechts Geste als transkulturelles Erkenntnismittel im Theater
Nonoa, Koku Gnatuloma UL

in Wessendorf, Markus (Ed.) Brecht unter Fremden (in press)

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See detailProcess analysis in thermal process engineering with high-performance computing using the example of grate firing
Peters, Bernhard UL; Rousset, Alban UL; Besseron, Xavier UL et al

in Process analysis in thermal process engineering with high- performance computing using the example of grate firing (in press)

Biomass as a renewable energy source continues to grow in popularity to reduce fossil fuel consumption for environmental and economic benefits. In the present contribution, the combustion chamber of a 16 ... [more ▼]

Biomass as a renewable energy source continues to grow in popularity to reduce fossil fuel consumption for environmental and economic benefits. In the present contribution, the combustion chamber of a 16 MW geothermal steam super-heater, which is part of the Enel Green Power "Cornia 2" power plant, is being investigated with high-performance computing methods. For this purpose, the extended discrete element method (XDEM) developed at the University of Luxembourg is used in a high-performance computing environment, which includes both the moving wooden bed and the combustion chamber above it. The XDEM simulation platform is based on a hybrid four-way coupling between the Discrete Element Method (DEM) and Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD). In this approach, particles are treated as discrete elements that are coupled by heat, mass, and momentum transfer to the surrounding gas as a continuous phase. For individual wood particles, besides the equations of motion, the differential conservation equations for mass, heat, and momentum are solved, which describe the thermodynamic state during thermal conversion. The consistency of the numerical results with the actual system performance is discussed in this paper to determine the potentials and limitations of the approach. [less ▲]

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See detailUsing Machine Learning to Assist with the Selection of Security Controls During Security Assessment
Bettaieb, Seifeddine UL; Shin, Seung Yeob UL; Sabetzadeh, Mehrdad UL et al

in Empirical Software Engineering (in press)

In many domains such as healthcare and banking, IT systems need to fulfill various requirements related to security. The elaboration of security requirements for a given system is in part guided by the ... [more ▼]

In many domains such as healthcare and banking, IT systems need to fulfill various requirements related to security. The elaboration of security requirements for a given system is in part guided by the controls envisaged by the applicable security standards and best practices. An important difficulty that analysts have to contend with during security requirements elaboration is sifting through a large number of security controls and determining which ones have a bearing on the security requirements for a given system. This challenge is often exacerbated by the scarce security expertise available in most organizations. [Objective] In this article, we develop automated decision support for the identification of security controls that are relevant to a specific system in a particular context. [Method and Results] Our approach, which is based on machine learning, leverages historical data from security assessments performed over past systems in order to recommend security controls for a new system. We operationalize and empirically evaluate our approach using real historical data from the banking domain. Our results show that, when one excludes security controls that are rare in the historical data, our approach has an average recall of ≈ 94% and average precision of ≈ 63%. We further examine through a survey the perceptions of security analysts about the usefulness of the classification models derived from historical data. [Conclusions] The high recall – indicating only a few relevant security controls are missed – combined with the reasonable level of precision – indicating that the effort required to confirm recommendations is not excessive – suggests that our approach is a useful aid to analysts for more efficiently identifying the relevant security controls, and also for decreasing the likelihood that important controls would be overlooked. Further, our survey results suggest that the generated classification models help provide a documented and explicit rationale for choosing the applicable security controls. [less ▲]

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See detailAging, technology, and psychology: Models of assistive device use viewed from an action-theoretical perspective on lifespan development
Abrilahij, Afsaneh UL; Boll, Thomas UL

in European Psychologist (in press)

Many older people suffer from functional declines and activity limitations, which reduce their autonomy and quality of life. Assistive technologies (ATs) could dampen such effects. However, many older ... [more ▼]

Many older people suffer from functional declines and activity limitations, which reduce their autonomy and quality of life. Assistive technologies (ATs) could dampen such effects. However, many older people do not use ATs and it is important to understand, why they give away their benefits. In this article, we look at older peoples´ use of ATs from an action perspective on human development elaborated by Brandtstädter and colleagues. We review from this viewpoint models of AT use created mostly in information systems technology, business administration, and management sciences. The major focus is on the extent to which these models consider the relevant internal (mental) and external context of AT use, possible action alternatives, and autonomous, vicarious, and joint modes of decision-making about ATs use. Systematic literature searches in PsycINFO, MEDLINE, and Google Scholar led us to 23 models. None of them contained as central variables any perceived discrepancies between the actual and desired developmental situation or any goals to reduce these discrepancies. No model included action alternatives to AT use beyond non-use such as trying harder on oneself, making environmental adaptations or using personal support. All models conceive of AT use as an act of the individual user, but neglected decision making about AT use by other persons on his or her behalf or a joint decision making of a potential user together with other persons (e.g., relatives). We discuss the background of these gaps, possibilities of a more comprehensive modeling of AT use, and practical implications (e.g., developmental counseling). [less ▲]

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See detailBiased perception of physiological arousal in child social anxiety disorder before and after cognitive behavioral treatment
Asbrand, Julia; Schulz, André UL; Heinrichs, Nina et al

in Clinical Psychology in Europe (in press)

Background: A biased perception of physiological hyperreactivity to social-evaluative situations is crucial for the maintenance of social anxiety disorder (SAD). Alterations in interoceptive accuracy (IAc ... [more ▼]

Background: A biased perception of physiological hyperreactivity to social-evaluative situations is crucial for the maintenance of social anxiety disorder (SAD). Alterations in interoceptive accuracy (IAc) when confronted with social stressors may play a role for SAD in children. We expected a biased perception of hyperarousal in children with SAD before treatment and, consequently, a reduced bias after successful cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT). Method: In two centers, 64 children with the diagnosis of SAD and 55 healthy control (HC) children (both 9 to 13 years) participated in the Trier Social Stress Test for Children (TSST-C), which was repeated after children with SAD were assigned to either a 12-week group CBT (n = 31) or a waitlist condition (n = 33). Perception of and worry about physiological arousal and autonomic variables (heart rate, skin conductance) were assessed. After each TSST-C, all children further completed a heartbeat perception task to assess IAc. Results: Before treatment, children with SAD reported both a stronger perception of and more worry about their heart rate and skin conductance than HC children, while the objective reactivity of heart rate did not differ. Additionally, children with SAD reported heightened perception of and increased worry about trembling throughout the TSST-C compared to HC children, but reported increased worry about blushing only after the stress phase of the TSST-C compared to HC children. Children with and without SAD did not differ in IAc. Contrary to our hypothesis, after treatment, children in the CBT group reported heightened perception of physiological arousal and increased worry on some parameters after the baseline phase of the TSST-C, whereas actual IAc remained unaffected. IAc before and after treatment were significantly related. Conclusions: Increased self-reported perception of physiological arousal may play a role in childhood SAD and could be an important target in CBT. However, further studies should examine if this is an epiphenomenon, a temporarily occurring and necessary condition for change, or indeed an unwanted adverse intervention effect. [less ▲]

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See detailYoung people feel wise and older people feel energetic: Comparing age stereotypes and self-evaluations across adulthood
Bowen, Catherine E.; Spuling, Svenja M.; Kornadt, Anna Elena UL et al

in European Journal of Ageing (in press)

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See detailBiomedical and Clinical Research Data Management
Ganzinger, Matthias; Glaab, Enrico UL; Kerssemakers, Jules et al

in Wolkenhauer, Olaf (Ed.) Systems Medicine - Integrative, Qualitative and Computational Approaches (in press)

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See detailClimate Finance: The case of developing States and legal readiness towards a transition to climate resilience
Alexandraki, Chrysa UL

in Sustainability (in press)

Climate change poses one of the greatest challenges on an international scale. Responding to this challenge requires the collective effort of all States, however, primary burden has been placed on climate ... [more ▼]

Climate change poses one of the greatest challenges on an international scale. Responding to this challenge requires the collective effort of all States, however, primary burden has been placed on climate finance deriving from developed States, reflecting a dichotomy amongst the member States to the UN climate change regime. The climate finance obligation, albeit justified under the UNFCCC and the principle of differentiation, does not come without challenges for both categories of States. Most of these challenges have focused so far on the donor side, as well as the institutional design and policy weaknesses of the development institutions administering and disbursing climate finance. Considerable challenges, however, also exist on the beneficiary side, especially due to the lack of national climate finance readiness and solid institutional frameworks and policies in recipient countries. This paper focuses on the legal aspects of readiness for climate finance examining the regulatory tools currently deployed by developing States to strengthen their domestic capacities. First, it elaborates on the climate finance obligation per se, while embarking on analyzing this obligation and the challenges it entails under the UN climate change framework. Second, it examines the concept of legal readiness by analyzing what it means to be ready for climate finance, the rationale of legal readiness and the role of law in enhancing developing States’ readiness for climate finance. In doing so, the paper elaborates on the existing taxonomies and guidelines on legal readiness for climate finance, as well as the regulatory and policy tools extensively utilized for this purpose in developing countries. Third, the paper demonstrates the case study of Bangladesh as a country that has advanced and adjusted its national legislation and policies, in order to enhance its legal readiness for climate finance. [less ▲]

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See detailMind the gap: Robotic Mission Planning Meets Software Engineering
Askarpour, Mehrnoosh; Menghi, Claudio UL; Belli, Gabriele et al

in Proceedings of the 8th International Conference on Formal Methods in Software Engineering (in press)

In the context of robotic software, the selection of an appropriate planner is one of the most crucial software engineering decisions. Robot planners aim at computing plans (i.e., blueprint of actions) to ... [more ▼]

In the context of robotic software, the selection of an appropriate planner is one of the most crucial software engineering decisions. Robot planners aim at computing plans (i.e., blueprint of actions) to accomplish a complex mission. While many planners have been proposed in the robotics literature, they are usually evaluated on showcase examples, making hard to understand whether they can be effectively (re)used for realising complex missions, with heterogeneous robots, and in real-world scenarios. In this paper we propose ENFORCE, a framework which allows wrapping FM-based planners into comprehensive software engineering tools, and considers complex robotic missions. ENFORCE relies on (i) realistic maps (e.g, fire escape maps) that describe the environment in which the robots are deployed; (ii) temporal logic for mission specification; and (iii) Uppaal model checker to compute plans that satisfy mission specifications. We evaluated ENFORCE by analyzing how it supports computing plans in real case scenarios, and by evaluating the generated plans in simulated and real environments. The results show that while ENFORCE is adequate for handling single-robot applications, the state explosion still represents a major barrier for reusing existing planners in multi-robot applications. [less ▲]

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See detailBlockchain and GS1 Standards in the Food Chain: A Review of the Possibilities and Challenges
Keogh, John G.; Rejeb, Abderahman; Khan, Nida UL et al

in Building the Future of Food Safety Technology, 1st Edition, Blockchain and Beyond (in press)

The globalization of food systems has engendered significant changes to the operation and structure of food supply chains (FSCs). Alongside increasing consumer demands for safe and sustainable food ... [more ▼]

The globalization of food systems has engendered significant changes to the operation and structure of food supply chains (FSCs). Alongside increasing consumer demands for safe and sustainable food products, FSCs are challenged with issues related to information transparency and consumer trust. Uncertainty in matters of transparency and trust arises from the growing information asymmetry between food producers and food consumers. In particular: how and where food is cultivated, harvested, processed, and under what conditions. FSCs are tasked with guaranteeing the highest standards in food quality and food safety-ensuring the use of safe and authentic ingredients, limiting product perishability, and mitigating the risk of opportunism such as quality cheating or falsification of information. A sustainable, food-secure world will require multidirectional sharing of information and enhanced information symmetry between food producers and food consumers. The need for information symmetry will drive transformational changes in FSCs methods of practice and will require a coherent standardized framework of best practice recommendations to manage logistic units in the food chain A standardized framework will enhance food traceability, drive FSC efficiencies, enable data interoperability, improve data governance practices, and set supply chain identification standards for products and assets (what), exchange parties (who), locations (where), business processes (why) and sequence (when). FSCs began to adopt industry-driven supply chain standards in 1974 when the first barcode was scanned at a point-of-sale at Marsh's Supermarket in Troy, Ohio. However, the adoption of standards alone will not adequately address the challenges created by the information asymmetry between food producers and food consumers. Therefore, this paper examines the integration of GS1 standards with the functional components of Blockchain technology as an approach to realize a coherent standardized framework of industry-based tools for successful FSC transformation. [less ▲]

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See detailNous l'avions attendu pendant des mois
Cicotti, Claudio UL

in Malvetti, Massimo (Ed.) Dante et Henri VII de Luxembourg: de l'utopie au prophetisme (in press)

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See detailUML Consistency Rules:a Case Study with Open-Source UML Models
Torre, Damiano UL; Labiche, Yvan; Genero, Marcela et al

in Proceedings of the 8th International Conference on Formal Methods in Software Engineering (in press)

UML models are standard artifacts used by software engineers for designing software. As software is designed, different UML diagram types (e.g., class diagrams and sequence diagrams) are produced by ... [more ▼]

UML models are standard artifacts used by software engineers for designing software. As software is designed, different UML diagram types (e.g., class diagrams and sequence diagrams) are produced by software designers. Since the various UML diagram types describe different aspects of a software system, they are not independent but strongly depend on each other, hence they must be consistent. Inconsistencies cause faults in the final software systems. It is, therefore, paramount that they get detected, analyzed, and fixed. Consistency rules are a useful tool proposed in the literature to detect inconsistencies. They categorize constraints that help in identifying inconsistencies when violated. This case study aims at collecting and analyzing UML models with OCL consistency rules proposed in the literature and at promoting the development of a reference benchmark that can be reused by the (FM-)research community. We collected 33 UML consistency rules and 206 different UML diagrams contained in 34 open-source UML models presented in the literature. We propose an FM-based encoding of the consistency rules in OCL. This encoding allows analyzing whether the consistency rules are satisfied or violated within the 34 UML models. To assess the proposed benchmark, we analyzed how the UML models, consistency rules, diagram types contained in the benchmark help in assessing the consistency of UML models, and the consistency of diagrams across the different software development phases. Our results show that the considered UML models and consistency rules allowed identifying 2731 inconsistencies and that those inconsistencies refer to different software development phases. We concluded that the considered UML models and consistency rules could be considered as an initial benchmark that can be further extended by the research community. [less ▲]

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See detailThe Future Food Chain: Digitization as an Enabler of Society 5.0
Keogh, John G.; Dube, Laurette; Rejeb, Abderahman et al

in Building the Future of Food Safety Technology, 1st Edition, Blockchain and Beyond (in press)

Food systems and food supply chains (FSCs) have undergone significant changes in their operations and structure over the last decade as globalization expands both food choice and availability. As FSCs ... [more ▼]

Food systems and food supply chains (FSCs) have undergone significant changes in their operations and structure over the last decade as globalization expands both food choice and availability. As FSCs lengthen, and food passes through extended trading relationships, transparency on food origins, methods of cultivation, harvest, processing as well as labor conditions and sustainability is reduced, along with food trust. Moreover, while the rapid pace of technology innovation benefits FSCs, we are witness to the usage of social media platforms by citizen-consumers to amplify the rhetoric related to recurring incidents and crises in food quality, food safety, food fraud, food security, sustainability, and other ethical lapses. Furthermore, we are witness to new evidence on the global burden of foodborne diseases, including non-communicable diseases that range from severe malnutrition to morbid obesity and from severe illnesses requiring hospitalization to mortality. The World Health Organization claims that thirty-one foodborne hazards cause six-hundred million illnesses and four-hundred and twenty thousand deaths annually. Overcoming these challenges requires a holistic reframing of our food systems and societal challenges. The emergence of the United Nations (UN) Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) provides an overarching framework for collaboration and alignment. Japan has put forward a vision for a human-centric, technology-enabled future branded as "Society 5.0". Increasingly, the redesign of FSCs necessitates a concerted, multi-stakeholder effort and the development of digitization strategies in order to cope with the evolution toward the vision of Society 5.0 and to achieve the UN SDGs. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 54 (1 UL)