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See detailMember, Management Board, European Banking Center Network
Wolff, Christian UL

Diverse speeches and writings (2020)

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See detailClarifying the Role of Negative Emotions in the Origin and Control of Impulsive Actions.
Eben, Charlotte; Billieux, Joël UL; Verbruggen, Frederick

in Psychologica Belgica (2020), 60(1), 1-17

This critical review elaborates on the origin of impulsive actions and how these can be controlled. We focus in particular on the role of negative events. First, we outline how impulsive actions often ... [more ▼]

This critical review elaborates on the origin of impulsive actions and how these can be controlled. We focus in particular on the role of negative events. First, we outline how impulsive actions often originate from negative events that are (emotionally) appraised. A discrepancy between this current state and a desired goal state leads to action tendencies. The urgency of the resulting action depends on the importance of the goal and the size of the discrepancy. Second, we discuss how such impulsive actions can be regulated or controlled e.g. by biasing competition between different options, or by completely suppressing all motor output. Importantly, such control mechanisms might also depend on emotional factors. To reconcile these findings, we present a coherent theoretical framework, taking into account various cognitive, affective, and motivational mechanisms as well as contextual factors that play a crucial role in the origin and control of impulsive actions. [less ▲]

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See detailModeling and Implementation of 5G Edge Caching over Satellite
Vu, Thang Xuan UL; Poirier, Yannick; Chatzinotas, Symeon UL et al

in International Journal of Satellite Communications and Networking (2020)

The fifth generation (5G) wireless networks have to deal with the high data rate and stringent latency requirements due to the massive invasion of connected devices and data-hungry applications. Edge ... [more ▼]

The fifth generation (5G) wireless networks have to deal with the high data rate and stringent latency requirements due to the massive invasion of connected devices and data-hungry applications. Edge caching is a promising technique to overcome these challenges by prefetching the content closer to the end users at the edge node’s local storage. In this paper, we analyze the performance of edge caching 5G networks with the aid of satellite communication systems. Firstly, we investigate the satellite-aided edge caching systems in two promising use cases: a) in dense urban areas, and b) in sparsely populated regions, e.g., rural areas. Secondly, we study the effectiveness of satellite systems via the proposed satellite-aided caching algorithm, which can be used in three configurations: i) mono-beam satellite, ii) multi-beam satellite, and iii) hybrid mode. Thirdly, the proposed caching algorithm is evaluated by using both empirical Zipf-distribution data and the more realistic Movielens dataset. Last but not least, the proposed caching scheme is implemented and tested by our developed demonstrators which allow real-time analysis of the cache hit ratio and cost analysis. [less ▲]

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See detailApproximation-Refinement Testing of Compute-Intensive Cyber-Physical Models: An Approach Based on System Identification
Menghi, Claudio UL; Nejati, Shiva UL; Briand, Lionel UL et al

in Proceedings of the 42st International Conference on Software Engineering (2020)

Black-box testing has been extensively applied to test models of Cyber-Physical systems (CPS) since these models are not often amenable to static and symbolic testing and verification. Black-box testing ... [more ▼]

Black-box testing has been extensively applied to test models of Cyber-Physical systems (CPS) since these models are not often amenable to static and symbolic testing and verification. Black-box testing, however, requires to execute the model under test for a large number of candidate test inputs. This poses a challenge for a large and practically-important category of CPS models, known as compute-intensive CPS (CI-CPS) models, where a single simulation may take hours to complete. We propose a novel approach, namely ARIsTEO, to enable effective and efficient testing of CI-CPS models. Our approach embeds black-box testing into an iterative approximation-refinement loop. At the start, some sampled inputs and outputs of the CI-CPS model under test are used to generate a surrogate model that is faster to execute and can be subjected to black-box testing. Any failure-revealing test identified for the surrogate model is checked on the original model. If spurious, the test results are used to refine the surrogate model to be tested again. Otherwise, the test reveals a valid failure. We evaluated ARIsTEO by comparing it with S-Taliro, an open-source and industry-strength tool for testing CPS models. Our results, obtained based on five publicly-available CPS models, show that, on average, ARIsTEO is able to find 24% more requirements violations than S-Taliro and is 31% faster than S-Taliro in finding those violations. We further assessed the effectiveness and efficiency of ARIsTEO on a large industrial case study from the satellite domain. In contrast to S-Taliro, ARIsTEO successfully tested two different versions of this model and could identify three requirements violations, requiring four hours, on average, for each violation. [less ▲]

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See detailNormal approximation for functions of hidden Markov models
Kerchev, George UL

E-print/Working paper (2020)

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See detailNouvelles perspectives sur les maternités. Regards croisés des Sciences et de la littérature
Barthelmebs, Hélène UL; Raguin, Marjolaine

Book published by Peter Lang (2020)

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See detailAttribute evaluation on attack trees with incomplete information
Buldas, Ahto; Gadyatskaya, Olga UL; Lenin, Aleksandr et al

in Computers and Security (2020), 88(101630),

Attack trees are considered a useful tool for security modelling because they support qualitative as well as quantitative analysis. The quantitative approach is based on values associated to each node in ... [more ▼]

Attack trees are considered a useful tool for security modelling because they support qualitative as well as quantitative analysis. The quantitative approach is based on values associated to each node in the tree, expressing, for instance, the minimal cost or probability of an attack. Current quantitative methods for attack trees allow the analyst to, based on an initial assignment of values to the leaf nodes, derive the values of the higher nodes in the tree. In practice, however, it shows to be very difficult to obtain reliable values for all leaf nodes. The main reasons are that data is only available for some of the nodes, that data is available for intermediate nodes rather than for the leaf nodes, or even that the available data is inconsistent. We address these problems by developing a generalisation of the standard bottom-up calculation method in three ways. First, we allow initial attributions of non-leaf nodes. Second, we admit additional relations between attack steps beyond those provided by the underlying attack tree semantics. Third, we support the calculation of an approximative solution in case of inconsistencies. We illustrate our method, which is based on constraint programming, by a comprehensive case study. [less ▲]

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See detailIntegrating Topological Proofs with Model Checking to Instrument Iterative Design
Menghi, Claudio UL; Rizzi, Alessandro Maria; Bernasconi, Anna

in Proceedings of the 23rd International Conference on Fundamental Approaches to Software Engineering, FASE 2020 (2020)

System development is not a linear, one-shot process. It proceeds through refinements and revisions. To support assurance that the system satisfies its requirements, it is desirable that continuous ... [more ▼]

System development is not a linear, one-shot process. It proceeds through refinements and revisions. To support assurance that the system satisfies its requirements, it is desirable that continuous verification can be performed after each refinement or revision step. To achieve practical adoption, formal verification must accommodate continuous verification efficiently and effectively. Model checking provides developers with information useful to improve their models only when a property is not satisfied, i.e., when a counterexample is returned. However, it is desirable to have some useful information also when a property is instead satisfied. To address this problem we propose TOrPEDO, an approach that supports verification in two complementary forms: model checking and proofs. While model checking is typically used to pinpoint model behaviors that violate requirements, proofs can instead explain why requirements are satisfied. In our work, we introduce a specific notion of proof, called Topological Proof. A topological proof produces a slice of the original model that justifies the property satisfaction. Because models can be incomplete, TOrPEDO supports reasoning on requirements satisfaction, violation, and possible satisfaction (in the case where satisfaction depends on unknown parts of the model). Evaluation is performed by checking how topological proofs support software development on 12 modeling scenarios and 15 different properties obtained from 3 examples from literature. Results show that: (i) topological proofs are ≈60% smaller than the original models; (ii) after a revision, in ≈78% of cases, the property can be re-verified by relying on a simple syntactic check. [less ▲]

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See detailCross-border everyday lives on the Luxembourg border? An empirical approach: the example of cross-border commuters and residential migrants
Wille, Christian UL; Roos, Ursula

in Wille, Christian; Nienaber, Birte (Eds.) Border Experiences in Europe. Everyday Life - Working Life - Communication - Languages (2020)

Luxembourg is characterized by phenomena of mobility that includecross-border commuters and residential migrants. While both groups havebeen mainly examined from a socioeconomic perspective, this ... [more ▼]

Luxembourg is characterized by phenomena of mobility that includecross-border commuters and residential migrants. While both groups havebeen mainly examined from a socioeconomic perspective, this paperadopts a sociocultural approach. We will focus on the question of the ex-tent to which cross-border mobility in everyday life promotes cross-borderlifeworlds. This will involve examining people’s social contacts at theirplace of work and/or place of residence as well as the spatial organizationof practices of the everyday life of both groups. The paper gives insights in-to everyday lives at the EU’s internal borders, whose organization into na-tion states is subordinate and at the same time constitutive. [less ▲]

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See detailHeart and brain: cortical representation of cardiac signals is disturbed in borderline personality disorder, but unaffected by oxytocin administration
Schmitz, M.; Müller, L. E.; Schulz, André UL et al

in Journal of Affective Disorders (2020), 264(1), 24-28

Background: Emotional dysregulation, a core feature of borderline personality disorder (BPD) has recently been linked to deficits in the cortical representation of bodily signals. Oxytocin modulates the ... [more ▼]

Background: Emotional dysregulation, a core feature of borderline personality disorder (BPD) has recently been linked to deficits in the cortical representation of bodily signals. Oxytocin modulates the salience of external social cues. However, its role in interoception is still not fully understood. The aim of the current study was to replicate reduced heartbeatevoked potentials (HEPs) as a marker for the cortical representation of cardiac signals in BPD and to explore potential effects of oxytocin on HEP amplitude. Methods: Fifty-three medication-free women with a DSM-IV diagnosis of BPD and sixty healthy female controls (HCs) participated in the study. In a randomized, double-blind placebo-controlled trial, participants self-administered either 24 I.U. of oxytocin or placebo and took part in a 5-minute resting-state electrocardiogram (ECG) with parallel electroencephalogram (EEG) measurement. In addition, emotional dysregulation and BPD symptomatology were assessed with self-report questionnaires. Results: Patients with BPD had significantly lower mean HEP amplitudes than HCs. Furthermore, HEP amplitudes were negatively correlated with emotional dysregulation in the whole sample. However, oxytocin had no significant effect on HEP amplitude. Limitations: Only female participants were investigated and no clinicial controls were included. Conclusions: This is the first replication from an independent sample showing a reduced cortical representation of cardiac signals in BPD patients. This, together with other bodyrelated symptoms, suggests deficits in the processing of bodily signals, which seem to be associated with emotional dysregulation. Whether oxytocin influences HEP during emotion regulation tasks needs to be investigated in future studies. [less ▲]

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See detailBrentanos Klingding. Eine Kulturpolitik der Buchstäblichkeit in der Romantik
Dembeck, Till UL

in Geisenhanslüke, Achim (Ed.) Buchstäblichkeit (2020)

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See detailCortisol rapidly increases baroreflex sensitivity of heart rate control, but does not affect cardiac modulation of startle
Schulz, André UL; Richter, Steffen; Ferreira de Sá, Diana S. et al

in Physiology and Behavior (2020), 215(1), 112792

Cortisol, the final product of human HPA axis activation, rapidly modulates the cortical processing of afferent signals originating from the cardiovascular system. While peripheral effects have been ... [more ▼]

Cortisol, the final product of human HPA axis activation, rapidly modulates the cortical processing of afferent signals originating from the cardiovascular system. While peripheral effects have been excluded, it remains unclear whether this effect is mediated by cortical or subcortical (e.g. brainstem) CNS mechanisms. Cardiac modulation of startle (CMS) has been proposed as a method to reflect cardio-afferent signals at subcortical (potentially brainstem-) level. Using a single blind, randomized controlled design, the cortisol group (n = 16 volunteers) received 1 mg cortisol intravenously, while the control group (n = 16) received a placebo substance. The CMS procedure involved the assessment of eye blink responses to acoustic startle stimuli elicited at six different latencies to ECG-recorded R-waves (R + 0, 100, 200, 300, 400 and 500 ms). CMS was assessed at four measurement points: baseline, -16 min, +0 min, and +16 min relative to substance application. Baroreflex sensitivity (BRS) of heart rate (HR) control was measured non-invasively based on spontaneous beat-to-beat HR and systolic blood pressure changes. In the cortisol group, salivary cortisol concentration increased after IV cortisol administration, indicating effective distribution of the substance throughout the body. Furthermore, BRS increased in the cortisol group after cortisol infusion. There was no effect of cortisol on the CMS effect, however. These results suggest that low doses of cortisol do not affect baro-afferent signals, but central or efferent components of the arterial baroreflex circuit presumably via rapid, non-genomic mechanisms. [less ▲]

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See detailUnderstanding Walking Meetings: Drivers and Barriers
Damen, Ida; Lallemand, Carine UL; Brankaert, Rens et al

Scientific Conference (2020)

There is increased interest in reducing sedentary behavior of office workers to combat the negative health effects of prolonged sitting. Walking meetings offer a promising solution to this problem as they ... [more ▼]

There is increased interest in reducing sedentary behavior of office workers to combat the negative health effects of prolonged sitting. Walking meetings offer a promising solution to this problem as they facilitate a physically active way of working. To inform future development of technologies supporting these type of meetings, in-depth qualitative insights into people’s experiences of walking meetings are needed. We conducted semi-structured walking interviews (N=16) to identify key drivers and barriers for walking meetings in a living lab setting by using the ‘WorkWalk’. The ‘WorkWalk’ is a 1.8 km walking route indicated by a dotted blue line with outdoor meeting points, integrated into the room booking system. Our findings provide insights into how walking meetings are experienced and affect the set-up and social dynamics of meetings. We propose design recommendations for the development of future technologies and service design elements to support walking meetings and active ways of working. [less ▲]

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See detailMeeting Designers Where They Are: Using Industry Events as a Research Venue for HCI and Design Methods Development
Lockton, Dan; Lallemand, Carine UL

Scientific Conference (2020)

There is much work in the CHI community about the ‘industry-academia divide’, and how to bridge it. One key crossover between HCI/UX scientists and practitioners is the development and use of tools and ... [more ▼]

There is much work in the CHI community about the ‘industry-academia divide’, and how to bridge it. One key crossover between HCI/UX scientists and practitioners is the development and use of tools and methods—boundary objects between academia and practice. Among other forms of collaboration, there is an underdeveloped opportunity for academics to make use of industry events (conferences, meetups, design jams) as a research venue in the context of tool and method development. This paper describes three cases from work in academia-industry engagement over the last decade, in which workshops or experiments have been run at industry events as a way of trialling and developing tools directly with practitioners. We discuss advantages of this approach and extract key insights and practical implications, highlighting how the CHI community might use this method more widely, gathering relevant research outcomes while contributing to knowledge exchange between academia and practice. [less ▲]

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See detailInterference Exploitation via Symbol-Level Precoding: Overview, State-of-the-Art and Future Directions
Li, Ang; Spano, Danilo UL; Krivochiza, Jevgenij UL et al

in IEEE Communications Surveys and Tutorials (2020)

Interference is traditionally viewed as a performance limiting factor in wireless communication systems, which is to be minimized or mitigated. Nevertheless, a recent line of work has shown that by ... [more ▼]

Interference is traditionally viewed as a performance limiting factor in wireless communication systems, which is to be minimized or mitigated. Nevertheless, a recent line of work has shown that by manipulating the interfering signals such that they add up constructively at the receiver side, known interference can be made beneficial and further improve the system performance in a variety of wireless scenarios, achieved by symbol-level precoding (SLP). This paper aims to provide a tutorial on interference exploitation techniques from the perspective of precoding design in a multi-antenna wireless communication system, by beginning with the classification of constructive interference (CI) and destructive interference (DI). The definition for CI is presented and the corresponding mathematical characterization is formulated for popular modulation types, based on which optimization-based precoding techniques are discussed. In addition, the extension of CI precoding to other application scenarios as well as for hardware efficiency is also described. Proof-of-concept testbeds are demonstrated for the potential practical implementation of CI precoding, and finally a list of open problems and practical challenges are presented to inspire and motivate further research directions in this area. [less ▲]

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See detailDomain-specific views on aging and preparation for age-related changes – Development and validation of three brief scales.
Kornadt, Anna Elena UL; Hess, Thomas M; Rothermund, Klaus

in Journals of Gerontology. Series B, Psychological Sciences and Social Sciences (2020), 75(2), 303-307

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See detailComparative Education in an Age of Competition and Collaboration
Powell, Justin J W UL

in Comparative Education (2020), 56

Comparative education relies on experiences, expertise, data, and criticism derived from multiple contexts and diverse levels to generate insights, facilitate understanding, and explain change. Marked by ... [more ▼]

Comparative education relies on experiences, expertise, data, and criticism derived from multiple contexts and diverse levels to generate insights, facilitate understanding, and explain change. Marked by connectivity, our contemporary era vastly increases the (potential) diffusion of ideas essential for scientific advance. Three interlocking trends emphasise the growing relevance of comparative educational research. Firstly, competition has become more potent – among scholars, their organisations, and within as across countries. Secondly, educational studies, as science more generally, are increasingly conducted in collaboration – across disciplinary, cultural, linguistic, and organisational boundaries – enhancing the potential for discovery while producing influential scholarship. Thirdly, while educational research and policymaking are increasingly comparative, comparative knowledge stores are often only selectively used. To counter such reductionism, in-depth comparative institutional analyses across divides of academy, policymaking, and practice remain crucial. The multidisciplinary field must claim its relevance more persuasively, even as scholarly exchange, mobilities, and cultural knowledge endure as vital foundations. [less ▲]

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See detailReview of Elizabeth Guffey (2018): Designing Disability: Symbols, Space and Society. London: Bloomsbury.
Powell, Justin J W UL

in Design Issues (2020), 36(1), 100-101

In her pathbreaking book Designing Disability: Symbols, Space and Society, Elizabeth Guffey provides vital insights into decades of social and design processes that ultimately produced the most ubiquitous ... [more ▼]

In her pathbreaking book Designing Disability: Symbols, Space and Society, Elizabeth Guffey provides vital insights into decades of social and design processes that ultimately produced the most ubiquitous symbol of disability—and accessibility—worldwide: The International Symbol of Access (ISA). Building on existing scholarship from a range of disciplines coupled with original historical research, this book uncovers the origins and evolving (largely transatlantic) architectural and design discourse, and several moments of serendipity, that led to its creation. The ISA has since diffused to become part of the built environment in all corners of the world. Richly illustrated and charting at times vitriolic debates, protest activities, and artistic interventions up to the contemporary era, Guffey weaves together activist and aesthetic perspectives into a tapestry of social and design history relating to disability and accessibility. Structured in historical phases, the book’s chapters progress across larger and shorter stretches over more than a century of wheelchair design, social and welfare policies and programs (mostly in the US, UK, and Scandinavia), architectural standards, and symbols relating to barriers and accessibility measures. Guffey engages the reader in what is necessarily a multidisciplinary, multilevel investigation, with unexpected twists and turns. On one level, the book focuses on the politics of highest office, with US Presidents Franklin D. Roosevelt and Dwight D. Eisenhower (who permanently or temporarily used wheelchairs) sketched against the backdrop of the lack of accessible government buildings in Washington, DC, and the social consensus then to hide impairment for fear of stigmatization (shifted marginally by disabled Veterans). On another level, welfare state provisions in the US, UK, and Scandinavia are discussed in light of progressive legislation and the persistent challenges of implementation. Finally, at ground level, the utmost significance of individuals devoted to universal design writ large becomes manifestly evident. Guffey recounts how, in US universities, inspirational figures such as Timothy Nugent (at Illinois), Ron Mace (at North Carolina State), and Viktor Papanek (at Purdue, CalArts, Kansas, etc.), campus planners, and students designed and constructed new worlds on the drawing board and poured in concrete. We follow design professionals, such as architect Selwyn Goldsmith in the UK, who was a strident arbiter of accessibility. Academic initiatives went hand-in-fist with advocacy activities in organizations and protest and artistic actions in the streets. Indeed, to raise general awareness of the ever-present attitudinal and structural barriers—institutionalized discrimination—that disabled people face daily and to secure disability rights, disability protests and cross-national organizing have repeatedly been necessary. The long and bumpy road to universal design extends into the future. Integral to this history of design development, revision, and critiques of various symbols of disability have been international events (world expositions, Olympics & Paralympics) and organizations (Rehabilitation International), artistic inspiration, design competitions, and guerilla art interventions. Tracing the convoluted process of designing what would become the ISA—fifty years ago now—leads to Susanne Koefoed, a Danish design student, and Karl Montan, leader of the Swedish Institute for the Handicapped, but also to international negotiations and chance. The on-going questioning of the official ISA, especially, its “misfit” nature as an amalgam of technical aid and person, emphasizes the shift from invisibility to ubiquity of disability via social change and political activism as well as cultural representations and the need for signs of identity. In the new century, newer initiatives in the US, such as Brendan Murphy’s and the Accessible Icon Project (developed by Sara Hendren and Brian Glenney), have challenged the official ISA, revealing both persistence and change in understandings of disability and accessibility. When integrated into signage, the ISA designates accessible spaces and facilities. If the ISA has become present in public buildings and spaces everywhere, cultural notions of disability and access remain understudied across the social sciences, with especially the Global South remaining a blank page. Research is needed to chart the diverse local interpretations that mirror shifts from exclusion to inclusion of disabled people as the human rights revolution witnessed since the end of WWII continues, but also suffers backlash, even in the Global North. Paradoxically, this global icon refers simultaneously to disability, and its ameliorating factor, accessibility. Yet, the ambivalence and debate surrounding the ISA persist, as Guffey emphasizes especially in the later chapters, focusing on proposed alternatives to the existing ISA, codified as it is in law and conforming to the guidelines of the International Organization for Standardization (ISO). Until universal design (and the universalizing social policies likely needed to support it) succeeds in reducing the barriers in environments and in attitudes and in maximizing the usefulness of products and services during the design stage, identity formation processes are among the most positive aspects of the ISA. The icon’s influence and implementation extend far beyond marking modifications to the built environment. Whether taken-for-granted, modified or critiqued, the current ISA has spread globally. It can now be found wherever people move in physical space, finding their way. The symbol testifies to the on-going shift from exclusion, along a slow and winding road, to social inclusion and full participation of disabled people. In sum, Guffey brings scholarship on the ISA to the next stage. It complements studies that chart the influence of disabled peoples’ organizations and of international organizations as they facilitated remarkable shifts in disability paradigms. Yet institutionalized discrimination abounds, with the ISA marking that accessibility and universal design are far from achieved. If a few imprecisions tarnish the literature list, this historical work reconstructing a largely Western process cannot be faulted for not providing a complete global analysis of ISA implementation and adjustment. In that vein, with contributions from Guffey herself, the current exhibition “Viktor Papanek: The Politics of Design” (Kries, Klein & Clarke, 2018) indeed extends the discussion to the Global South and across further disciplines, rightfully embedding the dialogue about symbols of disability and enhancing access within broader contexts. Footnote: Kries, Matteo, Amelie Klein & Alison J. Clarke (eds.) (2018). Viktor Papanek: The Politics of Design. Weil am Rhein, Germany: Vitra Design Museum. ISBN: 978-3-945852-26-2. The exhibition is currently on view at Germany’s Vitra Design Museum (20 September 2018–10 March 2019), then at Barcelona Design Museum (20 October 2019–2 February 2020). [less ▲]

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See detailLämdliche Räume Europas
Nienaber, Birte UL

in Gebhardt, Hans; Glaser, Rüdiger; Radtke, Ulrich (Eds.) et al Geographie - Physische Geographie und Humangeographie (2020)

The chapter of a university textbook explains the diversity of European rural areas and their development.

Detailed reference viewed: 5 (1 UL)