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See detailEuropäisches Kapitalmarktrecht: Grundlagen (§ 12)
Zetzsche, Dirk Andreas UL; Veidt, Robin UL

in Enzyklopädie des Europarechts, Europäisches Privat- und Unternehmensrecht, Band 6 (in press)

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See detailEuropäisches Kapitalmarktrecht: Unternehmenskapitalmarktrecht (§ 15)
Zetzsche, Dirk Andreas UL

in Enzyklopädie des Europarechts, Europäisches Privat- und Unternehmensrecht, Band 6 (in press)

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See detailEinleitung, §§ 4 -9, 16, 29 bis 39c, 59 bis 68 des Wertpapiererwerbs- und Übernahmegesetzes
Zetzsche, Dirk Andreas UL; Noack, Ulrich

in Schwark; Zimmer (Eds.) Kapitalmarktrechtskommentar (in press)

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See detail§ 53 WpHG betreffend Leerverkäufe
Zetzsche, Dirk Andreas UL; Lehmann, Mattias

in Schwark; Zimmer (Eds.) Kapitalmarktrechtskommentar (in press)

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See detail§§ 6 bis 15 WpHG betreffend die Eingriffsbefugnisse der BaFin und Positionskontrollen
Zetzsche, Dirk Andreas UL; Lehmann, Mattias

in Schwark; Zimmer (Eds.) Kapitalmarktrechtskommentar (in press)

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See detailThe AIFM Directive– European Regulation of Alternative Investment Funds
Zetzsche, Dirk Andreas UL

Book published by Kluwer Law International - 3rd ed. (in press)

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See detailRegulating Libra
Zetzsche, Dirk Andreas UL; Buckley; Arner

in Oxford Journal of Legal Studies (in press)

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See detailThe EU’s Future of Data-Driven Finance
Zetzsche, Dirk Andreas UL; Buckley, Ross; Arner, Douglas et al

in Common Market Law Review (in press)

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See detailThe Dark Side of Digital Financial Transformation: The New Risks of FinTech and the Rise of TechRisk
Zetzsche, Dirk Andreas UL; Arner, Douglas; Buckley, Ross

in Singapore Journal of Legal Studies (in press)

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See detailDual-Use Research In Ransomware Attacks: A Discussion on Ransomware Defence Intelligence
Genç, Ziya Alper UL; Lenzini, Gabriele UL; Sgandurra, Daniele

in Proceedings of the 6th International Conference on Information Systems Security and Privacy (in press)

Previous research has shown that developers rely on public platforms and repositories to produce functional but insecure code. We looked into the matter for ransomware, enquiring whether also ransomware ... [more ▼]

Previous research has shown that developers rely on public platforms and repositories to produce functional but insecure code. We looked into the matter for ransomware, enquiring whether also ransomware engineers re-use the work of others and produce insecure code. By methodically reverse-engineering 128 malware executables, we have found that, out of 21 ransomware samples, 9 contain copy-paste code from public resources. Thanks to this finding, we managed to retrieve the decryption keys with which to nullify the ransomware attacks. From this fact, we recall critical cases of code disclosure in the recent history of ransomware and, arguing that ransomware are components in cyber-weapons, reflect on the dual-use nature of this research. We further discuss benefits and limits of using cyber-intelligence and counter-intelligence strategies that could be used against this threat. [less ▲]

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See detailA Spatially explicit ABM of Central Place Foraging Theory and its explanatory power for hunter-gatherers settlement patterns formation processes
Sikk, Kaarel UL; Caruso, Geoffrey UL

in Adaptive Behaviour (in press)

The behavioural ecological approach to anthropology states that the density and distribution of resources determine optimal patterns of resource use and also sets its constraints to grouping, mobility and ... [more ▼]

The behavioural ecological approach to anthropology states that the density and distribution of resources determine optimal patterns of resource use and also sets its constraints to grouping, mobility and settlement choice. Central Place Foraging (CPF) models have been used for analysing foraging behaviours of hunter-gatherers and to draw a causal link from the volume of available resources in the environment to the mobility decisions of hunter-gatherers. In this study we propose a spatially explicit agent-based CPF mode. We explore its potential for explaining formation of settlement patterns and test its robustness to the configuration of space. Building on a model assuming homogeneous energy distributions we had to add several new parameters and an adaptation mechanism for foragers to predict the length of their stay, together with a heterogeneous environment configuration. The validation of the model shows that the spatially explicit CPF is generally robust to spatial configuration of energy resources. The total volume of energy has a significant effect on constraining sedentism as predicted by aspatial model and thus can be used on different environmental conditions. Still the spatial autocorrelation of resource distribution has a linear effect on optimal mobility decisions and needs to be considered in predictive models. The effect on settlement choice is not substantial and is more determined by other characteristics of settlement location. This limits the CPF models in analysing settlement pattern formation processes. [less ▲]

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See detailSustainability, FinTech and Financial Inclusion
Zetzsche, Dirk Andreas UL; Veidt, Robin UL; Buckley, Ross et al

in European Business Organization Law Review (in press)

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See detailThe EU’s Impact on Data-driven Finance
Zetzsche, Dirk Andreas UL; Buckley, Ross; Arner, Douglas et al

in Common Market Law Review (in press)

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See detailNous l'avions attendu pendant des mois
Cicotti, Claudio UL

in Malvetti, Massimo (Ed.) Dante et Henri VII de Luxembourg: de l'utopie au prophetisme (in press)

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See detailBiased perception of physiological arousal in child social anxiety disorder before and after cognitive behavioral treatment
Asbrand, Julia; Schulz, André UL; Heinrichs, Nina et al

in Clinical Psychology in Europe (in press)

Background: A biased perception of physiological hyperreactivity to social-evaluative situations is crucial for the maintenance of social anxiety disorder (SAD). Alterations in interoceptive accuracy (IAc ... [more ▼]

Background: A biased perception of physiological hyperreactivity to social-evaluative situations is crucial for the maintenance of social anxiety disorder (SAD). Alterations in interoceptive accuracy (IAc) when confronted with social stressors may play a role for SAD in children. We expected a biased perception of hyperarousal in children with SAD before treatment and, consequently, a reduced bias after successful cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT). Method: In two centers, 64 children with the diagnosis of SAD and 55 healthy control (HC) children (both 9 to 13 years) participated in the Trier Social Stress Test for Children (TSST-C), which was repeated after children with SAD were assigned to either a 12-week group CBT (n = 31) or a waitlist condition (n = 33). Perception of and worry about physiological arousal and autonomic variables (heart rate, skin conductance) were assessed. After each TSST-C, all children further completed a heartbeat perception task to assess IAc. Results: Before treatment, children with SAD reported both a stronger perception of and more worry about their heart rate and skin conductance than HC children, while the objective reactivity of heart rate did not differ. Additionally, children with SAD reported heightened perception of and increased worry about trembling throughout the TSST-C compared to HC children, but reported increased worry about blushing only after the stress phase of the TSST-C compared to HC children. Children with and without SAD did not differ in IAc. Contrary to our hypothesis, after treatment, children in the CBT group reported heightened perception of physiological arousal and increased worry on some parameters after the baseline phase of the TSST-C, whereas actual IAc remained unaffected. IAc before and after treatment were significantly related. Conclusions: Increased self-reported perception of physiological arousal may play a role in childhood SAD and could be an important target in CBT. However, further studies should examine if this is an epiphenomenon, a temporarily occurring and necessary condition for change, or indeed an unwanted adverse intervention effect. [less ▲]

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See detailBlockchain and GS1 Standards in the Food Chain: A Review of the Possibilities and Challenges
Keogh, John G.; Rejeb, Abderahman; Khan, Nida UL et al

in Building the Future of Food Safety Technology, 1st Edition, Blockchain and Beyond (in press)

The globalization of food systems has engendered significant changes to the operation and structure of food supply chains (FSCs). Alongside increasing consumer demands for safe and sustainable food ... [more ▼]

The globalization of food systems has engendered significant changes to the operation and structure of food supply chains (FSCs). Alongside increasing consumer demands for safe and sustainable food products, FSCs are challenged with issues related to information transparency and consumer trust. Uncertainty in matters of transparency and trust arises from the growing information asymmetry between food producers and food consumers. In particular: how and where food is cultivated, harvested, processed, and under what conditions. FSCs are tasked with guaranteeing the highest standards in food quality and food safety-ensuring the use of safe and authentic ingredients, limiting product perishability, and mitigating the risk of opportunism such as quality cheating or falsification of information. A sustainable, food-secure world will require multidirectional sharing of information and enhanced information symmetry between food producers and food consumers. The need for information symmetry will drive transformational changes in FSCs methods of practice and will require a coherent standardized framework of best practice recommendations to manage logistic units in the food chain A standardized framework will enhance food traceability, drive FSC efficiencies, enable data interoperability, improve data governance practices, and set supply chain identification standards for products and assets (what), exchange parties (who), locations (where), business processes (why) and sequence (when). FSCs began to adopt industry-driven supply chain standards in 1974 when the first barcode was scanned at a point-of-sale at Marsh's Supermarket in Troy, Ohio. However, the adoption of standards alone will not adequately address the challenges created by the information asymmetry between food producers and food consumers. Therefore, this paper examines the integration of GS1 standards with the functional components of Blockchain technology as an approach to realize a coherent standardized framework of industry-based tools for successful FSC transformation. [less ▲]

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See detailThe Future Food Chain: Digitization as an Enabler of Society 5.0
Keogh, John G.; Dube, Laurette; Rejeb, Abderahman et al

in Building the Future of Food Safety Technology, 1st Edition, Blockchain and Beyond (in press)

Food systems and food supply chains (FSCs) have undergone significant changes in their operations and structure over the last decade as globalization expands both food choice and availability. As FSCs ... [more ▼]

Food systems and food supply chains (FSCs) have undergone significant changes in their operations and structure over the last decade as globalization expands both food choice and availability. As FSCs lengthen, and food passes through extended trading relationships, transparency on food origins, methods of cultivation, harvest, processing as well as labor conditions and sustainability is reduced, along with food trust. Moreover, while the rapid pace of technology innovation benefits FSCs, we are witness to the usage of social media platforms by citizen-consumers to amplify the rhetoric related to recurring incidents and crises in food quality, food safety, food fraud, food security, sustainability, and other ethical lapses. Furthermore, we are witness to new evidence on the global burden of foodborne diseases, including non-communicable diseases that range from severe malnutrition to morbid obesity and from severe illnesses requiring hospitalization to mortality. The World Health Organization claims that thirty-one foodborne hazards cause six-hundred million illnesses and four-hundred and twenty thousand deaths annually. Overcoming these challenges requires a holistic reframing of our food systems and societal challenges. The emergence of the United Nations (UN) Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) provides an overarching framework for collaboration and alignment. Japan has put forward a vision for a human-centric, technology-enabled future branded as "Society 5.0". Increasingly, the redesign of FSCs necessitates a concerted, multi-stakeholder effort and the development of digitization strategies in order to cope with the evolution toward the vision of Society 5.0 and to achieve the UN SDGs. [less ▲]

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