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See detailGaussian model selection with an unknown variance
Baraud, Yannick UL; Giraud, Christophe; Huet, Sylvie

in Ann. Statist. (2009), 37(2), 630--672

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See detailEstimating the intensity of a random measure by histogram type estimators
Baraud, Yannick UL; Birgé, Lucien

in Probab. Theory Related Fields (2009), 143(1-2), 239--284

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See detailMechanical behaviour of standardized, endoskeleton-including hip spacers implanted into composite femurs
Thielen, T.; Maas, S.; Zuerbes, A. et al

in International Journal of Medical Sciences (2009)

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See detailThe moderating role of working memory load on affective attentional processes in health anxiety
Kornadt, Anna Elena UL; Witthoeft, Michael; Rist, Fred et al

in ZEITSCHRIFT FUR KLINISCHE PSYCHOLOGIE UND PSYCHOTHERAPIE (2009), 38(3), 194-202

Background: Cognitive-behavioral models of health anxiety propose selective attention as an important factor in the development and maintenance of the disorder. However, experimental evidence for this ... [more ▼]

Background: Cognitive-behavioral models of health anxiety propose selective attention as an important factor in the development and maintenance of the disorder. However, experimental evidence for this assumption is equivocal. It is possible that subjects with sub-threshold health anxiety are able to control attention to threat stimuli (cognitive compensation hypothesis). Simultaneous working memory load (WML) may be a factor restricting this control and increasing the attentional bias. Objectives: The aim of the current study was to investigate the cognitive compensation hypothesis for health anxiety in a student analog sample. Method: An emotional Stroop task (EST) with symptom and illness words was administered to students with elevated HA (N = 27), elevated depression (DY; N = 29), and controls (CG; N = 28). Compared to the standard condition, WML was increased by simultaneous rehearsing of a number. Results: A stronger attentional bias toward symptom words for the health anxious participants compared to the other two groups was only apparent in the no WML condition at the beginning of the experiment. Contrary to our assumptions, this group difference disappeared in the high WML condition. Conclusions: There was no experimental evidence for the cognitive compensation hypothesis in this study. WML might reduce the threat potential of symptom words for health anxious participants. This moderating role of WML in the context of affective attentional processes is in line with recent findings in emotion research. [less ▲]

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See detailFamilies, Foreignness, Migration
Venken, Machteld UL; Beyers, Leen; Goddeeris, Idesbald

in History of the Family (2009), 14(2),

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See detailFamilies, Foreignness, Migration. An Introduction.
Venken, Machteld UL; Beyers, Leen; Goddeeris, Idesbald

in History of the Family (2009), 4

See detailSeminar: Straddling the Iron Curtain? Migrants’ War Memories
Venken, Machteld UL

Presentation (2009)

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See detailLecture: Families, Foreignness, Migration. Now and Then
Venken, Machteld UL

Presentation (2009)

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See detailWeakness analysis of a key stream generator based on cellular automata
Pinel, Frédéric UL; Bouvry, Pascal UL

in International Conference on Parallel Processing and Applied Mathematics (2009)

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See detailBallsportler oder Tänzer? Ballkorobics als Möglichkeit der integrativen Sportvermittlung
Heck, Sandra UL

in Sportunterricht (2009), 58(11), 7-12

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See detailMoral Hazard and Free Riding in Collective Action
Anesi, Vincent UL

in Social Choice and Welfare (2009), 32

Most political and economic theorists point to moral hazard in teams as the main obstacle to lobbies’ collective action. In this paper, we address this important issue with a coalition-formation game. In ... [more ▼]

Most political and economic theorists point to moral hazard in teams as the main obstacle to lobbies’ collective action. In this paper, we address this important issue with a coalition-formation game. In the process of doing so, we characterize equilibrium lobby structures both in the absence and in the presence of moral hazard. Three notable results emerge from such an exercise: (1) an equilibrium lobby structure exists under both specifications of the model, (2) moral hazard in teams may raise large groups’ equilibrium lobby size, and (3) it may also raise the level of collective action of large groups with low organizational costs. [less ▲]

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