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See detailEarly Childhood Education and Care in Luxembourg - Is attendance influenced by immigration background and socioeconomic status?
Kaufmann, Lena Maria UL; Fischbach, Antoine UL; Ottenbacher, Martha UL et al

Poster (2022, November 10)

For decades, researchers have been raising awareness of the issue of educational inequalities in the multilingual Luxemburgish school system. Especially children from families with a migration background ... [more ▼]

For decades, researchers have been raising awareness of the issue of educational inequalities in the multilingual Luxemburgish school system. Especially children from families with a migration background or a lower socio-economic status show large deficits in their language and mathematics competences in comparison to their peers. The same applies to children who do not speak Luxemburgish or German as their first language (Hornung et al., 2021; Sonnleitner et al., 2021). One way to reduce such educational inequalities might be an early and extensive participation in early childhood education and care (ECEC). Indeed, participation in ECEC was found to be positively connected to language and cognitive development in other countries, especially for children from disadvantaged families (Bennett, 2012). However, these children attend ECEC less often (Vandenbroeck & Lazzari, 2014). There are indications that lower parental costs might go hand in hand with a greater attendance of ECEC in general (for a Luxembourgish study, see Bousselin, 2019) and in particular by disadvantaged families (Busse & Gathmann, 2020). The aim of this study is to spotlight the attendance of ECEC in Luxembourg during the implementation of the ECEC reform after 2017 which increased free ECEC hours for all families from 3 to 20 hours a week. We draw on a large dataset of about 35.000 children from the Épreuves Standardisées (ÉpStan, the Luxemburg school monitoring programme) from 2015 to 2021 and investigate which children attend any kind of regulated ECEC service (public, private or family daycare) in which intensity, taking socio-economic and cultural family factors into account. The findings might help to understand in which contexts ECEC attendance should be further encouraged. Implications for future policy decisions are discussed with the goal of further promoting equal educational opportunities for all children. [less ▲]

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See detailTechnostress During COVID-19: Action Regulation Hindrances and the Mediating Role of Basic Human Needs among Psychology Students
Schauffel, Nathalie; Kaufmann, Lena Maria UL; Rynek, Mona et al

in Psychology Learning and Teaching (2022)

The COVID-19 pandemic led to an abrupt change from in-person to online teaching in higher education, resulting in increased use of information and communication technology (ICT) and students’ stress and ... [more ▼]

The COVID-19 pandemic led to an abrupt change from in-person to online teaching in higher education, resulting in increased use of information and communication technology (ICT) and students’ stress and uncertainty. Integrating theories of human motivation, stress, and humane work design, we investigated whether different types of action regulation hindrances (ARH) pertaining to human (ICT competence deficits), technology (technical problems), interaction (coordination difficulties), and task aspects (work overload) related to technostress (H1). Furthermore, we examined if this relationship was mediated by satisfaction of the basic human needs for competence, autonomy, and relatedness (H2). Our analysis of causes and mechanisms of technostress is based on cross-sectional survey data (self-report) from 205 psychology students attending an organizational psychology class that was switched from an in-person to an online format due to the COVID-19 pandemic. Structural equation modeling revealed that different types of ARH (i.e., ICT competence deficits, technical problems, coordination difficulties, work overload) positively predicted technostress (β  =  .17 to β  =  .42, p <.05). The effects were (partially) mediated by satisfaction of the need for autonomy (β  =  .11 to β  =  .15, p <.05), for all ARH except technical problems (β  =  .01, p  =  .86). We discuss implications for online course planning, technostress prevention as well as potential interventions beyond pandemic times. [less ▲]

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See detailTechnostress during COVID-19: Action regulation hindrances and the mediating roles of basic human needs among psychology students.
Schauffel, Nathalie; Kaufmann, Lena Maria UL; Ellwart, Thomas et al

Scientific Conference (2021, September)

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