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See detailSuicide Prevention: Using the Number of Health Complaints as an Indirect Alternative for Screening Suicidal Adolescents
Heinz, Andreas UL; Catunda, Carolina UL; van Duin, Claire UL et al

in Journal of Affective Disorders (2020), 260

Background: Suicide is the second leading cause of death in adolescents. Screening for persons at risk usually includes asking about suicidal ideation, which is considered inappropriate in some societies ... [more ▼]

Background: Suicide is the second leading cause of death in adolescents. Screening for persons at risk usually includes asking about suicidal ideation, which is considered inappropriate in some societies and situations. To avoid directly addressing suicide, this paper investigates whether the Health Behaviour in School-aged Children Symptom Checklist (HBSC-SCL), a validated non-clinical measure of eight subjective health complaints (e.g. headache, feeling low), could be used as a tool for screening suicidal ideation and behavior in adolescents. Methods: 5262 secondary school students aged 12-18 answered the Luxembourgish HBSC 2014 survey, including the HBSC-SCL items and suicidal ideation and behavior questions. Results: Each HBSC-SCL item correlates with suicidal ideation and behavior. A sum score was calculated ranging from zero to eight health complaints to predict respondents who considered suicide (area under the ROC curve = .770). The ideal cut-off for screening students who consider suicide is three or more health complaints: sensitivity is 66.3%, specificity is 75.9% and positive predictive value is 32.9%. Limitations: One limitation is HBSC-SCL's low positive predictive value. This is a general problem of screening rare events: the lower the prevalence, the lower the positive predictive value. Sensitivity and specificity could be improved by taking age-, gender- and country-specific cut-off values, but such refinements would make the score calculation more complicated. Conclusions: The HBSC-SCL is short, easy to use, with satisfactory screening properties. The checklist can be used when suicide cannot be addressed directly, and also in a more general context, e.g. by school nurses when screening adolescents. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 130 (21 UL)
Peer Reviewed
See detailTrends in cannabis consumption among youth in Luxembourg
Catunda, Carolina UL; van Duin, Claire UL; Heinz, Andreas UL et al

Scientific Conference (2019, September)

Background: Cannabis is the most widely consumed illegal drug worldwide. Among adolescents, cannabis use is a risk factor for cognitive decline, mental illness, social problems, and the use of other ... [more ▼]

Background: Cannabis is the most widely consumed illegal drug worldwide. Among adolescents, cannabis use is a risk factor for cognitive decline, mental illness, social problems, and the use of other psychoactive drugs. The current study presents trends in cannabis consumption among adolescents in Luxembourg. Methods: The Health Behaviour in School Aged Children (HBSC) Study in Luxembourg collected data in 2006, 2010, 2014 and 2018 using a standardized paper-pencil questionnaire. In total, 23,346 secondary schools students aged 11 to 18 years old (M=15.51, SD=1.53) responded to questions on cannabis, tobacco and alcohol consumption (lifetime and the past 30 days). Findings: In general, students who never used cannabis significantly increased over the four HBSC study waves (78%, 81.2%, 81%, 84%), whereas trends are similar for boys (74.5%, 77%, 78.2%, 81.4%), but not for girls (81.5%, 85%, 83.2%, 86.3%). Cannabis use (past 30 days) significantly differ for girls (94.1%, 94.1%, 92.8%, 93.7%), but not in general (91.7%, 92%, 90.9%, 91.7%), neither for boys (89.3%, 90.1%, 88.6%, 89.6%). Discussion: Cannabis lifetime use remains high for both genders. While consumption in the last 30 days remained stable for boys, it increased for girls over the past years. Tailored preventive interventions, based on health psychological models, are essential to educate adolescents about the social-cognitive risks of cannabis use and strengthen their capacities and resilience to resist experimental drug use and social pressure. In a context where legalization policies are discussed in various European countries, e-health approaches, for example, could be widely implemented in a cost-effective manner. [less ▲]

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See detailCommunication with father and mother differently impacts suicidal behaviour
Catunda, Carolina UL; van Duin, Claire UL; Heinz, Andreas UL et al

Poster (2019, September)

Background: Positive relationships with parents can reduce the risk of suicidal behaviour in adolescents. Previous research has indicated that adolescents who report poor communication with their parents ... [more ▼]

Background: Positive relationships with parents can reduce the risk of suicidal behaviour in adolescents. Previous research has indicated that adolescents who report poor communication with their parents are more likely to display suicidal behaviour. The aim of this study is to find out whether communication with the father or mother is equally important for suicidal behaviour. Methods: A total of 5595 students aged from 12 to 18 years old in secondary school participated in the 2014 HBSC Luxembourg survey. They responded to a questionnaire including, among others: 4 questions regarding sadness, suicide ideation, planning and attempt, and 2 questions about ease of communication with their father and mother. Findings: Adolescents who indicate poorer communication with their mother or father have higher odds for all suicidal behaviours. Poor communication with fathers has a bigger influence on the odds for sadness, whereas poor communication with mothers has a bigger influence on the odds for attempted suicide. Lastly, adolescents who don`t have or don`t see their mother or father are at increased risk for the suicidal behaviours, although the odds are not as high as for those indicating very difficult communication with their parent(s). Discussion: The Luxembourgish findings confirm the results of previous research and go further showing that, as a determinant, communication with mother differs from the communication with father. More studies should confirm these findings and include other variables, such as social support and stress, in order to see their relation with the communication with both parental figures and suicidal behaviours. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 30 (1 UL)
Peer Reviewed
See detail"Are you a boy or girl?" Who are the non-responders
Heinz, Andreas UL; Catunda, Carolina UL; van Duin, Claire UL et al

Scientific Conference (2019, June 20)

Background: In many studies, participants who do not state their gender are excluded from the analysis. This may be appropriate if they do not answer the questionnaire seriously. However, some ... [more ▼]

Background: In many studies, participants who do not state their gender are excluded from the analysis. This may be appropriate if they do not answer the questionnaire seriously. However, some participants may have understandable reasons for not reporting their gender, e.g. questioning their gender identity. Objective: How many students and which students do not answer the question on gender? Methods: HBSC 2018 raw data from Ireland, Luxembourg, Belgium and France are compared. To explore the reasons for non-response, we divided the participants into 3 groups: 1. Responders answered both sociodemographic questions (age and gender) 2. age non-responders did not answer the question on age. 3. Gender non-responders answered the question on age, but not the one on gender. Results: Between 0.8% (Ireland) and 1.2% (Luxembourg) of participants did not report their gender. About half of them did not answer the age question either. However, the other half belong to the group of gender non-responders and this group is disadvantaged compared to responders: they report lower life satisfaction, lower self-rated health, more health complaints, less peer support and their WHO-5 Well-being score is lower. Not answering the question on gender is rare. If the participants answered the question on age, but not the question on gender, then the variable gender is missing not at random. Implication: The question arises whether the group of gender non-responders should be included in the analysis and whether the question on gender should be asked differently in the future. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 116 (11 UL)
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See detailIs Life Satisfaction Contagious?
Catunda, Carolina UL; Heinz, Andreas UL; van Duin, Claire UL et al

Scientific Conference (2019, June)

Background: Life satisfaction (LS) is a major component of adolescents’ subjective well-being, facilitating adaptive development and influencing health. Literature shows that social support influences ... [more ▼]

Background: Life satisfaction (LS) is a major component of adolescents’ subjective well-being, facilitating adaptive development and influencing health. Literature shows that social support influences adolescents LS. In addition, the social network can affect health-related behaviors of adults - individuals that smoke or exercise tend to group together. However, the effects of others` LS on adolescents’ individual evaluation of LS (the contagion hypothesis) is still to be addressed. Objective(s): To test the contagion hypothesis of adolescents’ life satisfaction (how LS of proxies influences the individual LS appraisal). Method: Data is from 9738 students (aged 9-20) from the 2018 HBSC Luxembourg survey. A multilevel analysis was used to evaluate LS, with the school classes as subjects (model 1) to estimate the influence of being in a certain school class. Later, FAS, age and gender were entered as control variables (model 2). Results: The grand mean (intercept) for LS in model 1 was 7.57 (SE=.03, p<.001). For model 2, FAS (b=.47, SE=.03, p<.001), age (b=-.14, SE=.01, p<.001) and gender (b=-.23, SE=.04, p<.001) were significantly predictive of LS. The grand mean for LS, conditioned on the presence of FAS, age and gender, was 9.02 (SE=.05, p<.001). Interclass Correlation Coefficient decreased from model 1 (ICC=.08) to model 2 (ICC=.04). Conclusions: Results suggest that part of the variance of LS can be explained by the school class level. In other words, school class clusters have an influence on their LS, indicating that the LS of adolescents from a class partially accounts for individual LS. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 53 (4 UL)
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See detailUsing data from the HBSC study for evidence-based suicide prevention in Luxembourg
van Duin, Claire UL; Heinz, Andreas UL; Catunda, Carolina UL et al

in European Journal of Public Health (2019), 29

Detailed reference viewed: 25 (1 UL)
Peer Reviewed
See detailGender differences in risk factors for suicidal behaviours in adolescents
van Duin, Claire UL; Catunda, Carolina UL; Heinz, Andreas UL et al

Scientific Conference (2018, December 07)

Introduction: As the second leading cause of death among young people suicide is a severe public health problem. Previous studies have indicated that risk factors for suicidal behaviours differ for males ... [more ▼]

Introduction: As the second leading cause of death among young people suicide is a severe public health problem. Previous studies have indicated that risk factors for suicidal behaviours differ for males and females, although it remains uncertain whether gender predicts suicidal behaviors. The 2014 HBSC study in Luxembourg has gathered data on the suicidal ideation sequence in adolescents and can contribute to these issues. Purpose: The objective of this study was to examine gender differences within the risk factors for suicidal behaviours within the adolescent population of Luxembourg. Materials and Methods: Data on suicidal ideation among adolescents was collected through written survey. Data from secondary school students aged 12 to 18 was used (N=5595). Bivariate logistic regressions were conducted in order to identify risk factors for the dependent variables of “sadness”, “considering suicide”, “planning suicide” and “suicide attempt” in the last twelve months. Subsequently, multivariate logistic regressions were performed split by gender. 24 independent variables were included in the models. Results: The three significant variables that added most to the models for “sadness” and “suicide attempt” are named. For boys, the odds for sadness were impacted by the number of health complaints (OR: 1.4 for each additional health complaint; CI: 1.4-1.6), life satisfaction (OR: 1.2 for each additional unit; CI: 1.2-1.3) and body image (OR: 1.6 for too thin; CI: 1.1-2.3; OR: 1.7 for too fat; CI: 1.3-2.3). For girls, the variables were the number of health complaints (OR: 1.4; CI: 1.3-1.4), life satisfaction (OR: 1.3; CI: 1.2-1.4) and sexual abuse (OR: 2.5; CI: 2.0-3.1). Considering suicide attempts, for boys the odds were impacted by the physical fighting (OR: 2.9 for 4 fights or more; CI: 1.5-5.5), life satisfaction (OR: 1.2; CI: 1.3-2.1) and substance use (OR: 1.7; CI: 1.3-2.1). For girls, the number of health complaints (OR: 1.3, CI: 1.2-1.4), life satisfaction (OR: 1.3; CI: 1.2-1.4) and type of school (OR: 3.7 for secondary technique; CI: 2.1-5.0) impacted the odds. Conclusion: This study has indicated that differences in risk factors between the genders increase as the severity of suicidal behavior increases. This highlights the need for distinct strategies for the prevention of suicide behaviours that are suitable for the different genders, and their respective risk factors. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 89 (4 UL)
Peer Reviewed
See detailSuicide Prevention in Luxembourg: Using the HBSC Symptom Checklist as an Alternative Tool for Screening
Catunda, Carolina UL; van Duin, Claire UL; Heinz, Andreas UL et al

Poster (2018, December 07)

Introduction: Suicide is one of the leading causes of death of young people and as such, screening for suicidal ideation is a major public health concern. However, there is fear that exposure to suicide ... [more ▼]

Introduction: Suicide is one of the leading causes of death of young people and as such, screening for suicidal ideation is a major public health concern. However, there is fear that exposure to suicide-related content would encourage suicide attempt. This false idea is a great barrier to effectively screen. Hence, the need for tools without suicide content. Purpose: The goal of this study is to present a short tool that could be helpful for suicide screening and prevention. Materials and Methods: This study is based on the 2014 HBSC Luxembourg survey. A total of 5595 students aged from 12 to 18 years old in secondary school responded to a questionnaire translated to both French and German. Among others, it included the HBSC Symptom Checklist, a scale developed to measure eight health complaints (headache, abdominal pain, backache, feeling low, irritability, feeling nervous, sleeping difficulties and dizziness), as well as 4 questions asked in a logical sequence concerning sadness, suicide ideation, suicide planning and suicide attempt. Results: Multivariate Logistic Regression analyses with 24 potential indicators showed the number of health complaints as the most predictive indicator for suicide attempt (OR=1.248; C.I.: 1.175-1.325). Following, a significant ROC curve (area under the curve of 0.76; sensitivity=0.68 and specificity=0.73) and Youden Index (0.41) indicates the optimum cut-off at three complaints, with a predictive value of 17%. An alternative cut off point at four (sensitivity=0.57 and specificity=0.82; Youden Index of 0.39) has a predictive value of 21%. Conclusion: The HBSC Symptom Checklist seems to be a good predictor as each additional health complaint increases the risk of suicide attempt by 25%. In addition, it could be an alternative to traditional suicide screening measures, as its sensitivity, specificity and predictive values are similar to measures more commonly used, such as the Columbia Suicide Screen or the Beck Depression Inventory. Further work should be invested to validate the HBSC Symptom Checklist as a screening tool for suicide prevention. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 91 (11 UL)
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See detailCannabis Use during Adolescence: An Overview in Luxembourg and in Comparison to other European Countries
Catunda, Carolina UL; van Duin, Claire UL; Heinz, Andreas UL et al

Scientific Conference (2018, December 06)

Introduction: Cannabis is the most widely consumed illegal drug worldwide. The use of cannabis is a risk factor for mental illnesses, but also for social problems such as lower educational attainment and ... [more ▼]

Introduction: Cannabis is the most widely consumed illegal drug worldwide. The use of cannabis is a risk factor for mental illnesses, but also for social problems such as lower educational attainment and the use of other drugs. Consumption is considered particularly harmful if it starts early in adolescence, if in a high-dose and if it continues on a regular basis. Purpose: This study aims to give an overview on adolescents’ cannabis consumption in Luxembourg (how often and when they started consuming cannabis) and in comparison with other European countries. Materials and Methods: In 2014, 3461 students in secondary school took part in the HBSC study. The questionnaire translated to both French and German. They answered, among other health related questions, about their cannabis use (30 days and lifetime prevalence), as well as when they started consuming it. Results: Two groups were formed: 15-16 and 17-18 years old. In the 15-16 group, 11.2% used cannabis in the past 30 days and 21.7% tried it at least once in their lives. In the age group of 17-18, 15.2% stated using it in the last month and 38% in lifetime. Regarding the use in the past 30 days split by gender, the prevalence for girls is 8.9% and 13.8% for boys (15-16 age group) and 10.6% and 20.1% respectively (17-18 year-olds). The lifetime prevalence for 15-16 years old is 18% for both girls and boys, higher than the 13% HBSC participant countries (mostly European) mean for girls and 17% for boys. Finally, about the age they first tried cannabis, 6.8% of boys and 5.3% of girls responded the age of 12 (or younger), a similar ascendant curve is found and the prevalence of 25% for boys is reached at the age of 14 years, as for girls it is at 14.2 years old. Conclusion: First, our results highlight the differences between the 30-day versus lifetime consumption, indicating the latter is much more widespread than the regular consumption. Secondly, the older the students are, the higher the proportion of cannabis users, for both boys and girls, with regular consumption being more frequent among boys. In addition, consumption in a lifetime in Luxembourg is higher than other Europeans countries. Finally, a quarter of consumers started at the age of 14 or younger. This data indicates not only that prevention programs still are in need, but they should start early. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 102 (9 UL)
See detailIdéation suicidaire – Les tendances et les groupes à risque chez les adolescents au Luxembourg
Catunda, Carolina UL

Conference given outside the academic context (2018)

Le suicide est l'une des principales causes de décès chez les jeunes et l'adolescence est une période à risque pour le développement des idées suicidaires. L’objectif de cette communication est de ... [more ▼]

Le suicide est l'une des principales causes de décès chez les jeunes et l'adolescence est une période à risque pour le développement des idées suicidaires. L’objectif de cette communication est de présenter les tendances et les groupes à risque chez les adolescents au Luxembourg. Les résultats montrent que le sexe, le niveau socioéconomique, la structure familiale, le type d'école, l'âge et le harcèlement, entre autres sont des variables associés aux idées et comportement suicidaires. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 42 (1 UL)
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See detailGesundheit und Wohlbefinden von Kindern und Jugendlichen - Bericht zur HBSC-Befragung luxemburgischer Schülerinnen und Schüler 2014
Heinz, Andreas UL; van Duin, Claire UL; Catunda, Carolina UL et al

Book published by University of Luxembourg (2018)

The following report contains the results of the Luxembourgish Health Behaviour in School-aged Children (HBSC) study, which was conducted in the year 2014. The HBSC study is a cross-national survey study ... [more ▼]

The following report contains the results of the Luxembourgish Health Behaviour in School-aged Children (HBSC) study, which was conducted in the year 2014. The HBSC study is a cross-national survey study that collects data every four years in school classes across Europe, Asia and Canada. In Luxembourg, students from primary and secondary schools that teach according to the Luxembourgish curriculum were included in the study. This report contains the data of 7233 students aged 11 to 18 years old. The HBSC study inquires about a wide range of topics, including questions on subjective well-being, nutrition, physical activity, social relationships in- and outside of school, use of addictive substances and sexual behaviour. This report examines these topics mainly with regard to socio-demographic characteristics. With regards to gender, neither boys nor girls are at a clear disadvantage for the researched themes. The position of boys and girls depends on the theme, which means that for certain themes boys are at a disadvantage, whereas for other themes girls are at a disadvantage. Boys indicate higher rates of substance use (alcohol, tobacco and cannabis), higher rates of overweight and they watch more television than girls. However, girls report less physical activity, lower rates of breakfast consumption, more health complaints and lower life satisfaction compared to boys. For almost all the indicators examined, the 11-12-year-olds have the best scores and often the next group (13-14-year-olds) is already performing significantly worse. The only exception in this pattern was found for the variable of bullying: the older the students are, the less often they are victims of bullying. The age 12-13 is therefore considered a critical phase of life from a health perspective. Additionally, the social status of students is of relevance for their health. The large majority of indicators show that the higher the family affluence, the better the results reported by students. Students from the Fondamental are younger, and thus obtain better scores for the majority of indicators than the students from secondary schools. Within secondary schools, better scores are obtained by Secondaire classique students compared to Secondaire technique students. In the international comparison, Luxembourgish students are inconspicuous and often placed in the midfield with average scores. Compared to students in other countries, Luxembourgish students report to do more sports and they report fewer occasions of drunkenness in their life. However, Luxembourg obtained low scores for two indicators: Luxembourgish students have a high number of health complaints (e.g. pain, problems falling asleep, nervousness) and their life satisfaction is relatively low. [less ▲]

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See detailKörperliche Aktivität von Schülern in ihrer Freizeit / Activité physique des élèves pendant leur temps libre
Heinz, Andreas UL; Kern, Matthias Robert UL; Residori, Caroline UL et al

E-print/Working paper (2018)

In der HBSC-Studie 2014 wurden die Schüler gefragt, wie häufig sie in ihrer Freizeit so aktiv sind, dass sie außer Atem oder ins Schwitzen kommen. Rund jeder zehnte Schüler ist nach eigenen Angaben nie ... [more ▼]

In der HBSC-Studie 2014 wurden die Schüler gefragt, wie häufig sie in ihrer Freizeit so aktiv sind, dass sie außer Atem oder ins Schwitzen kommen. Rund jeder zehnte Schüler ist nach eigenen Angaben nie körperlich aktiv, rund jeder sechste ist hingegen an 7 Stunden oder häufiger pro Woche aktiv. Im internationalen Vergleich sind die luxemburgischen Schüler überdurchschnittlich häufig körperlich aktiv. Allerdings nimmt die Aktivität im Laufe der Jugend ab und bestimmte Gruppen sind aktiver als andere: Jungen sind in allen Altersgruppen aktiver als Mädchen und Kinder aus wohlhabenden Familien sind aktiver als Kinder aus nicht wohlhabenden Familien. Schüler des Enseignement secondaire sind aktiver als Schüler des Modulaire. [less ▲]

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See detailMobbing in der Schule / Harcèlement à l’école
Heinz, Andreas UL; van Duin, Claire UL; Kern, Matthias Robert UL et al

E-print/Working paper (2018)

In der Kindheit und Jugend gemobbt zu werden ist ein Risikofaktor für schlechtere Schulleistungen, aber langfristig auch für Angststörungen im Erwachsenenalter. Daher wurde in der HBSC-Studie 2014 gefragt ... [more ▼]

In der Kindheit und Jugend gemobbt zu werden ist ein Risikofaktor für schlechtere Schulleistungen, aber langfristig auch für Angststörungen im Erwachsenenalter. Daher wurde in der HBSC-Studie 2014 gefragt, wie häufig die Schüler in den vergangenen Monaten in der Schule gemobbt wurden. 73 % waren nicht von Mobbing betroffen, 16 % wurden 1- bis 2-mal gemobbt und 11 % wurden mindestens 2-mal pro Monat gemobbt. Ältere Schüler waren seltener Opfer von Mobbing als jüngere Schüler, wobei Jungen und Mädchen in allen Altersgruppen ähnlich häufig betroffen waren. Dementsprechend waren die Schüler des Fondamental und des Modulaire häufiger betroffen als die Schüler des Secondaire technique und des Secondaire. Schüler, die aus Familien mit einem geringen Wohlstandsniveau stammen, waren häufiger Mobbingopfer als Schüler aus wohlhabenden Familien. Mit der Häufigkeit des Mobbings sinkt die Lebenszufriedenheit und die Zahl der Gesundheitsbeschwerden steigt. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 436 (15 UL)
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See detailBewertung des Klassenklimas / Climat de classe
van Duin, Claire UL; Heinz, Andreas UL; Kern, Matthias Robert UL et al

E-print/Working paper (2018)

In der HBSC-Studie 2014 sollten die Schüler die folgende Aussage zum Klassenklima bewerten: „Die meisten Schüler in meiner Klasse sind nett und hilfsbereit.“ 72 % stimmen dieser Aussage zu, 10 % lehnen ... [more ▼]

In der HBSC-Studie 2014 sollten die Schüler die folgende Aussage zum Klassenklima bewerten: „Die meisten Schüler in meiner Klasse sind nett und hilfsbereit.“ 72 % stimmen dieser Aussage zu, 10 % lehnen sie ab und 18 % wählen die neutrale Mittelkategorie. Getrennt nach Alter und Geschlecht zeigen sich kaum Unterschiede im wahrgenommenen Klassenklima. Allerdings bewerten Schüler des Fondamental und des Secondaire das Klassenklima besser als Schüler des Secondaire technique und des Modulaire. Je besser das Klassenklima bewertet wird, desto zufriedener sind die Schüler mit ihrem Leben und desto mehr mögen sie die Schule. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 155 (9 UL)
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See detailQualität der Kommunikation in der Familie / Qualité de la communication au sein de la famille
Heinz, Andreas UL; Kern, Matthias Robert UL; Residori, Caroline UL et al

E-print/Working paper (2018)

In der HBSC-Studie 2014 sollten die Schüler vier Aussagen zur Qualität der Kommunikation in ihrer Familie auf einer Skala von 1 (= niedrige Qualität) bis 5 (= hohe Qualität) bewerten. Über 80 % vergeben ... [more ▼]

In der HBSC-Studie 2014 sollten die Schüler vier Aussagen zur Qualität der Kommunikation in ihrer Familie auf einer Skala von 1 (= niedrige Qualität) bis 5 (= hohe Qualität) bewerten. Über 80 % vergeben gute Bewertungen im Bereich von 4 oder 5. Rund 12 % der Schüler bewerten die Qualität der Familienkommunikation im mittleren Bereich (3) und 5 % vergeben niedrige Bewertungen (1 oder 2). Ältere Schüler bewerten die Familienkommunikation schlechter als jüngere. Dementsprechend bewerten Schüler des Fondamental die Familienkommunikation besser als Schüler von Sekundarschulen. Schüler, die eine hohe Qualität angeben, berichten eine geringere Zahl von Gesundheitsbeschwerden. [less ▲]

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See detailFernsehkonsum von Schülern / Consommation de télévision
van Duin, Claire UL; Heinz, Andreas UL; Kern, Matthias Robert UL et al

E-print/Working paper (2018)

In der HBSC-Studie 2014 wurden die Schüler gefragt, wie lange sie an einem Wochentag fernsehen. Knapp 8 % geben an, nicht fernzusehen, weitere 19 % schauen eine halbe Stunde fern. 57 % schauen 2 Stunden ... [more ▼]

In der HBSC-Studie 2014 wurden die Schüler gefragt, wie lange sie an einem Wochentag fernsehen. Knapp 8 % geben an, nicht fernzusehen, weitere 19 % schauen eine halbe Stunde fern. 57 % schauen 2 Stunden oder mehr fern, was als häufiger TV-Konsum definiert wird. Bei Schülern im Alter von 13-18 ist häufiger TV-Konsum weiter verbreitet als bei Schülern im Alter von 11-12. Des Weiteren ist häufiger TV-Konsum verbreiteter bei Schülern des Secondaire technique als bei Schülern des Fondamental sowie des Secondaire. Schüler, die davon ausgehen, dass ihre Lehrer sie für leistungsschwach halten, schauen häufiger Fernsehen als Schüler, die denken, dass ihre Lehrer sie für überdurchschnittlich leistungsfähig halten. [less ▲]

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See detailTägliches Essen von Obst und Gemüse / Consommation quotidienne de fruits et de légumes
van Duin, Claire UL; Residori, Caroline UL; Kern, Matthias Robert UL et al

E-print/Working paper (2018)

Ein hoher Gemüse- und Obstverzehr ist Teil eines gesunden Lebensstils. In der HBSC-Studie 2014 wurden die Schüler daher gefragt, wie häufig sie Obst und Gemüse essen: 37 % gaben an, täglich Obst zu essen ... [more ▼]

Ein hoher Gemüse- und Obstverzehr ist Teil eines gesunden Lebensstils. In der HBSC-Studie 2014 wurden die Schüler daher gefragt, wie häufig sie Obst und Gemüse essen: 37 % gaben an, täglich Obst zu essen und 32 % gaben den täglichen Verzehr von Gemüse an. Schüler der Altersgruppe 11-12 essen häufiger Obst und Gemüse als Schüler im Alter von 13-18. Der tägliche Konsum von Obst und Gemüse ist bei Mädchen häufiger als bei Jungen. Des Weiteren ist der tägliche Konsum bei Schülern aus wohlhabenden Familien weiter verbreitet als bei Schülern aus nicht wohlhabenden Familien. Schüler des Fondamental und des Enseignement secondaire geben einen täglichen Verzehr häufiger an als Schüler des Enseignement secondaire technique und des Modulaire. [less ▲]

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See detailAlkoholkonsum von Schülern in Luxemburg / La consommation d’alcool des élèves au Luxembourg
Catunda, Carolina UL; van Duin, Claire UL; Kern, Matthias Robert UL et al

E-print/Working paper (2018)

In der HBSC-Studie 2014 wurden die Schüler gefragt, ob sie in den vergangenen 30 Tagen Alkohol getrunken haben. Von den 11-12-Jährigen gaben dies 4 % an, in der Altersgruppe 17-18 waren es 68 %. Bis zum ... [more ▼]

In der HBSC-Studie 2014 wurden die Schüler gefragt, ob sie in den vergangenen 30 Tagen Alkohol getrunken haben. Von den 11-12-Jährigen gaben dies 4 % an, in der Altersgruppe 17-18 waren es 68 %. Bis zum Alter von 16 Jahren geben Jungen und Mädchen ähnlich häufig Alkoholkonsum an. In der Altersgruppe 17-18 haben männliche Jugendliche häufiger als weibliche Jugendliche Alkohol getrunken (73 % vs. 63 % in den vergangenen 30 Tagen). Ältere Jugendliche aus wohlhabenden Familien gaben häufiger Alkoholkonsum an als Jugendliche aus Familien mit geringem Wohlstand (74 % vs. 63 %). Zudem konsumieren die 15-18-jährigen Schüler des Enseignement secondaire häufiger Alkohol als die Schüler des Enseignement secondaire technique. Verglichen mit 15-jährigen Schülern aus anderen Ländern geben die luxemburgischen Schüler seltener an, bereits zweimal oder häufiger in ihrem Leben betrunken gewesen zu sein. [less ▲]

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See detail« Actuellement que penses-tu de l’école? »
van Duin, Claire UL; Heinz, Andreas UL; Kern, Matthias Robert UL et al

E-print/Working paper (2018)

L'école est un lieu important de socialisation dans lequel les élèves passent beaucoup de temps. Les expériences positives en lien avec l’école peuvent favoriser leur développement social et celui de leur ... [more ▼]

L'école est un lieu important de socialisation dans lequel les élèves passent beaucoup de temps. Les expériences positives en lien avec l’école peuvent favoriser leur développement social et celui de leur santé, tandis que les expériences négatives peuvent perturber leur développement. Par conséquent, l'étude HBSC de 2014 a demandé à quel point les élèves aimaient leur école. Parmi les 11-12 ans, 30 % disent aimer beaucoup l'école et 52 % l'aiment un peu. Dans le groupe des 15-16 ans, 11 % disent aimer beaucoup l'école et 15 % ne l'aiment pas du tout. En conséquence, les élèves du fondamental sont plus nombreux à aimer beaucoup l’école que les élèves du secondaire. Cependant, il n'y a pratiquement pas de différences entre les écoles secondaires classique, technique et modulaire. En outre, plus les élèves se sentent stressés par les devoirs, moins ils aiment l'école. Ils ont également tendance à ne pas l’aimer quand ils soupçonnent que leurs enseignants les considèrent comme n’étant pas assez performants. Enfin, moins les élèves aiment leur école, plus ils signalent de problèmes de santé. [less ▲]

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