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See detailThe health, well-being and life satisfaction of young people in Luxembourg before the COVID-19 pandemic and during deconfinement
Residori, Caroline UL; Schomaker, Léa UL; Samuel, Robin UL

Scientific Conference (2020, November 10)

Background: During 2020, most aspects of young people’s lives have been altered by the COVID-19 pandemic and the measures being implemented to contain it. Early studies on the effects of the COVID-19 ... [more ▼]

Background: During 2020, most aspects of young people’s lives have been altered by the COVID-19 pandemic and the measures being implemented to contain it. Early studies on the effects of the COVID-19 pandemic suggest that confinement (so-called “lockdowns”) affect health, well-being and life satisfaction. However, the current situation in many countries is not confinement but prolonged deconfinement with less strict but still considerable measures and recommendations. Objectives: The possible effects of this deconfinement on the health, well-being and life satisfaction of young people is the focus of this oral presentation, which is based on the YAC-Young Adults and COVID-19 study (see Residori et al., 2020). Methods: The study relies on data collected from a random sample of residents of Luxembourg for the Youth Survey Luxembourg in Mai-July 2019 (age-range: 16-29, n=2.800) and in July 2020 (age-range: 12-29, n=3768, preliminary data). The data was gathered via online survey and using the same items as the HBSC study (self-rated health, life satisfaction (Cantril ladder) and the WHO-5 Well-being Index) (Sozio et al., 2020). Results: The cross-sectional comparison of this representative data, explores the health, wellbeing and life satisfaction of young people in Luxembourg before and during the COVID-19 pandemic. The results are presented for the overall population and detailed by socio-demographic groups. For the 12-15-year-olds, the observed proportion reporting a low life satisfaction (<6) was, for example, 31.3% in 2020. This proportion has increased from 19.9% in 2019 to 25.5 % in 2020 for the 16-20-year-olds, from 23.9% to 35.3 % for the 21-25-year-olds and from 20.2% to 32.8% for the 26-29-year-olds. Conclusion: The presentation will conclude on a reflection of the links between the observed differences and the measures implemented to during deconfinement as well as the scientific and political relevance of the observed differences for Luxembourg and other countries. Literature: Residori, Caroline; Sozio, Maria E.; Schomaker, Lea; Samuel, Robin (2020): YAC – Young People and COVID-19. Preliminary Results of a Representative Survey of Adolescents and Young Adults in Luxembourg. University of Luxembourg: Esch-sur-Alzette Sozio, M., Procopio, A., & Samuel, R. (2020). Youth Survey Luxembourg – Technical Report 2019. Esch-sur-Alzette: University of Luxembourg. [less ▲]

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See detailThe application of factorial surveys to study recruiters’ hiring intentions: comparing designs based on hypothetical and real vacancies
Gutfleisch, Tamara Rebecca UL; Samuel, Robin UL; Sacchi, Stefan

in Quality and Quantity (2020)

Factorial survey experiments have been widely used to study recruiters’ hiring intentions. Respondents are asked to evaluate hypothetical applicant descriptions, which are experimentally manipulated, for ... [more ▼]

Factorial survey experiments have been widely used to study recruiters’ hiring intentions. Respondents are asked to evaluate hypothetical applicant descriptions, which are experimentally manipulated, for hypothetical job descriptions. However, this methodology has been criticized for putting respondents in hypothetical situations that often only partially correspond to real-life hiring situations. It has been proposed that this criticism can be overcome by sampling real-world vacancies and the recruiters responsible for filling them. In such an approach, only the applicants’ descriptions are hypothetical; respondents are asked about a real hiring problem, which might increase internal and external validity. In this study, we test whether using real vacancies triggers more valid judgments compared to designs based on hypothetical vacancies. The growing number of factorial survey experiments conducted in employer studies makes addressing this question relevant, both for methodological and practical reasons. However, despite the potential implications for the validity of data, it has been neglected so far.We conducted a factorial survey experiment in Luxembourg, in which respondents evaluated hypothetical applicants referring either to a currently vacant position in their company or to a hypothetical job. Overall, we found little evidence for differences in responses by the design of the survey experiment. However, the use of real vacancies might prove beneficial depending on the research interest.We hope that our comparison of designs using real and hypothetical vacancies contributes to the emerging methodological inquiry on the possibilities and limits of using factorial survey experiments in research on hiring. [less ▲]

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See detailValuing Creativity, Feeling Overworked and Working Hours: Male Workers and the New Spirit of Capitalism
Samuel, Robin UL; Kanji, Shireen

in Time & Society (2020), 29(1), 51-73

Boltanski and Chiapello argued that creativity is a required attribute of managers emanating from the ideology of the ‘New Spirit of Capitalism’. Ideology provides the justification for work practices and ... [more ▼]

Boltanski and Chiapello argued that creativity is a required attribute of managers emanating from the ideology of the ‘New Spirit of Capitalism’. Ideology provides the justification for work practices and brings material consequences in relation to the experience of time. This article explores both the ideology and the links between the ideological and the experience of time by assessing whether male managers prioritise creativity and whether this is related to their working hours, driving them to work longer hours than other workers and longer hours than they actually want. Men’s dominant position in work organisations puts them at the centre of this exploration. Using multilevel logistic and linear models on 2010 data from the European Social Survey (N = 7049), we show that male managers prioritise creativity more than other workers do. There are consequences for the experience of time as valuing creativity in combination with being a manager increases working hours above the large and significant effect of being a manager. The feeling of overwork is raised independently for those who value creativity and for those who are managers. [less ▲]

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See detailYouth Survey Luxembourg – Technical Report 2019
Sozio, Maria Eugenia; Procopio, Alessandro UL; Samuel, Robin UL

Report (2020)

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See detailYAC – Young People and COVID-19. Preliminary Results of a Representative Survey of Adolescents and Young Adults in Luxembourg
Residori, Caroline UL; Sozio, Maria Eugenia; Schomaker, Léa UL et al

Report (2020)

Overall, the preliminary results of the representative survey of adolescents and young adults in Luxembourg paint a complex picture. In general, young people seem to be aware of their responsibility to ... [more ▼]

Overall, the preliminary results of the representative survey of adolescents and young adults in Luxembourg paint a complex picture. In general, young people seem to be aware of their responsibility to contain the coronavirus. The majority have the necessary information and opportunities to act in a way that reflects this responsibility. There are suggestions of negative impacts stemming from COVID-19 and measures to combat COVID-19, but these do not appear to be the prevailing dynamic at the time of completing the survey. However, it is likely that negative effects will increase the longer the COVID-19 pandemic lasts and the more individual and social resources are depleted. There are already detectable beginnings of sociodemographic and socioeconomic differences in how people are coping with the COVID-19 pandemic. It is therefore important to continue to provide young people with support for mastering the transition between childhood and adulthood despite COVID-19 and to responsibly provide them with the opportunities and spaces this requires. This process must pay particular attention to inequalities that are developing and being reinforced. [less ▲]

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See detailNeurologists, neurosurgeons, and psychiatrists' personality traits: a comparison
Surbeck, Werner; Samuel, Robin UL; Spieler, Derek et al

in Acta Neurochirurgica (2020)

Background: Clinicians in neuroscientific disciplines may present distinct personality profiles. Despite of potential relevance to clinical practice, this has not yet been studied. We therefore aimed to ... [more ▼]

Background: Clinicians in neuroscientific disciplines may present distinct personality profiles. Despite of potential relevance to clinical practice, this has not yet been studied. We therefore aimed to compare personality profiles of physicians working in the three main disciplines of clinical neuroscience, i.e., neurologists, neurosurgeons, and psychiatrists, between each other, across levels of training and to other specialties. Methods:An online survey using the Ten-Item Personality Inventory (TIPI), an internationally validated measure of the five-factor model of personality dimensions, was distributed to board-certified physicians, residents, and medical students in several European countries and Canada. Differences in personality profiles were analyzed using multivariate analysis of variance and canonical linear discriminant analysis on age- and sex-standardized z-scores of personality traits. Single personality traits were analyzed using robust t tests. Results: Of the 5148 respondents who completed the survey, 723 indicated the specialties neurology, neurosurgery, or psychiatry. Compared to all other specialties, personality profiles of training and trained physicians in these three main clinical neuroscience disciplines (“NN&P”) significantly differed, with significantly higher scores in openness to experience. Within NN&P, there were significant differences in personality profiles, driven by lower neuroticism in neurosurgeons, higher conscientiousness in neurosurgeons and neurologists, and higher agreeableness in psychiatrists. Across levels of training, NN&P personality profiles did not differ significantly. Conclusion: The distinct clinical neuroscience personality profile is characterized by higher levels of openness to experience compared to non-neuroscience specialties. Despite high variability within each discipline, moderate, but solid differences in the personality profiles of neurologists, neurosurgeons and psychiatrists exist. [less ▲]

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See detailHiring Processes in Male- and Female-Dominated Occupations: Evidence for Gendered Scarring due to Unemployment
Gutfleisch, Tamara Rebecca UL; Samuel, Robin UL

Presentation (2019, September 14)

Spells of unemployment have been shown to negatively affect the hiring chances of job applicants. These so-called "scarring effects" might be gender-specific due to gender bias in recruiters' hiring ... [more ▼]

Spells of unemployment have been shown to negatively affect the hiring chances of job applicants. These so-called "scarring effects" might be gender-specific due to gender bias in recruiters' hiring decisions. However, systematic analyses of the conditions under which scarring effects become gender-specific are missing. Against this background, we examine how gender and the duration of unemployment interactively shape recruiters' hiring decisions. We use data from a multinational factorial survey experiment among recruiters conducted in Switzerland and Norway. By focusing on a male-dominated (mechanics) and a female-dominated occupation (nursing), we test the hypothesis that gendered role expectations affect recruiters' hiring decisions towards unemployed men and women. We find, overall, evidence for heterogeneous scarring effects. By constituting new evidence on gender differences in scarring due to unemployment, this study contributes to our understanding of the demand-side barriers to successful and "gender-equal" transitions to employment. [less ▲]

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See detailEmployers’ hiring decisions in relation to young people in Luxembourg (EDYPOLU)
Gutfleisch, Tamara Rebecca UL; Samuel, Robin UL

Report (2019)

In this report, we present a selection of preliminary descriptive results from the EDYPOLU research project funded by the University of Luxembourg (2017-2020). The research project examines the labour ... [more ▼]

In this report, we present a selection of preliminary descriptive results from the EDYPOLU research project funded by the University of Luxembourg (2017-2020). The research project examines the labour market for young people in Luxembourg with an interest in operational staffing needs, general human resource requirements and selection processes of recruiters. The main objective of the project is to identify possible obstacles for a successful entry into the labor market for young job seekers in Luxembourg by studying the general mechanisms in recruiters’ evaluation of young job candidates. To this end, we conducted an online survey among recruiters working in different occupational fields in Luxembourg between November 2018 and January 2019. A pilot study was conducted in spring 2018. The EDYPOLU recruiter survey builds on the Horizon 2020 project NEGOTIATE (https://negotiate-research.eu/). In the context of NEGOTIATE, a recruiter survey was conducted in four countries: Bulgaria, Greece, Norway, and Switzerland. EDYPOLU surveys a number of topics that have also been examined in NEGOTIATE. This makes it possible to draw some comparisons between the results of both studies. [less ▲]

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See detailUsing Hypothetical Vacancies in Factorial Surveys to Study Employers' Hiring Decisions – A Valid Approach?
Gutfleisch, Tamara Rebecca UL; Samuel, Robin UL

Presentation (2019, July 18)

Factorial survey experiments are increasingly employed by scholars interested in understanding the general mechanisms underlying employers' hiring decisions in relation to specific applicant ... [more ▼]

Factorial survey experiments are increasingly employed by scholars interested in understanding the general mechanisms underlying employers' hiring decisions in relation to specific applicant characteristics. Usually, a sample of human resource professionals is asked to rate the hiring chances of hypothetical applicants for a hypothetical job. However, using hypothetical job descriptions for the evaluation of applicants in factorial surveys may reduce the internal and external validity of the results. For example, employers might apply different evaluation standards when assessing the quality of applicant profiles for a hypothetical job (put less/more weight on certain characteristics) because it is difficult to put themselves in the actual hiring situation – affecting the internal validity. In this paper, we contextualize prior factorial survey experiments by examining whether there is a difference in employers' hiring intentions when confronted with real versus hypothetical hiring problems. Despite the growing number of factorial surveys and the potential implications for the validity of these data, this question has been widely neglected so far. We employ a factorial survey experiment among recruiters in different occupational sectors in Luxembourg. Recruiters evaluate the hiring chances of several profiles of hypothetical applicants with varying characteristics either referring to a real vacancy in their company or to a hypothetical (but similar) job type. Preliminary findings suggest no differences in employers hiring decisions based on the type of evaluation used in the factorial survey. The results partly contradict previous findings from pretest data which showed significant differences between the average hiring chances in the two groups. By examining the internal validity of presenting hypothetical vacancies, this study contributes to methodological research on factorial surveys as well as to the literature studying employers' hiring decisions. [less ▲]

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See detailAre Cox Regression Models a Valuable Tool for Social Stratification Research on Health? A Simulation Study.
Procopio, Alessandro UL; Samuel, Robin UL

Presentation (2019, July 17)

In our contribution, we assess the possibilities and limits of Cox regression models in social stratification research in the area of health. We are motivated by the need for a structured analytical ... [more ▼]

In our contribution, we assess the possibilities and limits of Cox regression models in social stratification research in the area of health. We are motivated by the need for a structured analytical strategy through which researchers can deal with health inequality. Previous findings suggest considering health as a relevant resource but also one, which is unequally distributed among the members of a population. Along these lines, we focus on the inequality of risks distribution and the social stratification of (non) access to health as a resource. Using the substantive example of health inequality, we perform five Monte Carlo simulations in constructed longitudinal data. Each setting simulates a different source of bias. Specifically: a) Measurement error (misspecification of time measurement); b) Linear dependency between class of origin, destination and mobility effects; c) Omitted variables bias; d) Disentangle of timing/probability effects, namely speed/overall occurrence likelihood of an event; and e) Unobserved heterogeneity among groups. The health-related risks approach in analysing health inequalities has a twofold advantage: a) it splits the health outcome in a true differential and in a stochastic component due to chance and b) it considers only the first – and in most cases more interesting part – as a source of inequality. Moreover, Cox regression models allow for a flexible parameterization conditional to the specific research settings. For instance, addition of frailty parameters to the regression equation can help social scientists to reduce unobserved heterogeneity. This problem is especially encountered in social stratification research when comparing logit transition probabilities. In summary, this study contributes to the current literature by demonstrating the flexibility of Cox regression models in social stratification research in the area of health. It further provides valuable analytic avenues for theory-driven empirical research in social scientific health research as it uncovers how various sources of bias affect estimates. [less ▲]

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See detailUnemployment Scarring and Gendered Occupations: Evidence from a Cross-Country Factorial Survey
Gutfleisch, Tamara Rebecca UL; Samuel, Robin UL

Presentation (2019, January 18)

The experience of early unemployment has been linked to a wide range of subsequent outcomes such as lower levels of well-being, lower wages and a host of other disadvantages in the labor market ... [more ▼]

The experience of early unemployment has been linked to a wide range of subsequent outcomes such as lower levels of well-being, lower wages and a host of other disadvantages in the labor market ("unemployment scarring"). As youth unemployment continues to be one of the main challenges of our time, it is important to anlayse the determinants affecting transitions to employment for young individuals. Empirical evidence from recent experimental studies emphasizes the long-neglected role of recruiters in the reintegration of individuals into the labor market. However, these studies rarely address potential gender differences in unemployment scarring by employing experimental designs that do not allow for extensive gender comparisons - potentially leaving important mechanisms behind recruiters' role in the reproduction of gender inequalities widely unexplored. Moreover, these studies differ in the context in which they were conducted making it difficult to draw conclusions regarding the extent to which unemployment might have different consequences for men and women. We extend the previous literature by examining how unemployment and gender interactively shape recruiters' evaluation of young applicants' hiring chances. Speci fically, we aim at addressing the shortcomings of previous research by comparing the hiring chances for young male and female jobseekers between different occupations and national contexts. Drawing on established labor market theories and social psychological theories about gendered role expectations and their impact on the evaluation of behavior ("role congruity theory"), we expect to find differences in unemployment scarring across gender. In particular, we expect that the gendered stereotypes associated with certain occupations affect recruiters' evaluation of unemployment for men and women. Recruiters might use unemployment as justifi cation to discriminate against workers when applying for gender-atypical jobs (e.g. women applying for traditionally and culturally male-typed jobs). On the other hand, recruiters might apply a more lenient standard towards the opposite-sex unemployed worker in order to overcompensate for the low share of e.g. women in male-typed jobs. To test our hypotheses, we use data from a large-scale factorial survey experiment among recruiters in four European countries and different occupational sectors. We focus on a male-typed and a female-typed occupational sector (mechanics and nursing, respectively) to explore the workings of gendered stereotypes. The multifactorial experimental design of the factorial survey allows us to compare different types of unemployment (timing and duration) and to hold unemployment orthogonal to other factors (e.g. education). Employing linear multilevel regression models, we fi nd, overall, heterogeneous scarring effects of unemployment across gender. Especially current unemployment spells seem to negatively affect the hiring chances for men applying for nursing jobs. Our preliminary findings constitute new evidence on gender differences in scarring due to unemployment. Moreover, they demonstrate that ignoring contextual factors in studying heterogeneous scarring effects across gender potentially leaves important mechanisms in recruiters' hiring decisions undetected. This study further contributes to the literature on transitions to employment as well as on gender inequalities in the labor market more generally by studying the demand-side mechanisms leading recruiters to discriminate against men and women in gendered-occupations. [less ▲]

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See detailLebenssituationen und Erfahrungen von lesbischen, schwulen, bisexuellen und trans* Jugendlichen in Luxemburg
Meyers, Christiane UL; Reiners, Diana; Samuel, Robin UL

Report (2019)

Diese von der Universität Luxemburg im Auftrag des Ministeriums für Bildung, Kinder und Jugend durchgeführte Studie ist explorativ angelegt. Mit einem Mixed-Methods-Ansatz wurden einerseits internationale ... [more ▼]

Diese von der Universität Luxemburg im Auftrag des Ministeriums für Bildung, Kinder und Jugend durchgeführte Studie ist explorativ angelegt. Mit einem Mixed-Methods-Ansatz wurden einerseits internationale Datenerhebungen zu Einstellungen der Gesamtbevölkerung und eine LGBT*-Befragung sekundär für Luxemburg ausgewertet. Zweitens wurde der politische und mediale Diskurs mittels einer qualitativen Dokumentenanalyse untersucht. Den dritten Teil bildet eine Analyse von qualitativen Interviews mit acht Jugendlichen (davon zwei trans* Personen), sowie sieben Expert_innen. Durch die geringe Fallzahl sind die vorgestellten Ergebnisse als Einblick in die Lebenssituationen, jedoch nicht als abschließende Gesamtuntersuchung der Situation von lesbischen, schwulen, bisexuellen und trans* Jugendlichen in Luxemburg einzuordnen. [less ▲]

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See detailNegative life events, self-efficacy, and social support: Risk and protective factors for school dropout intentions and dropout
Samuel, Robin UL; Burger, Kaspar

in Journal of Educational Psychology (2019)

Prior studies have noted several risk and protective factors for school dropout; however, only a few have examined longer-term vulnerabilities alongside temporary risk and protective factors. Consequently ... [more ▼]

Prior studies have noted several risk and protective factors for school dropout; however, only a few have examined longer-term vulnerabilities alongside temporary risk and protective factors. Consequently, we focused on the role that both stable and time-varying psychosocial risk and protective factors play in dropout intentions and actual dropout, using a 4-year longitudinal design. We investigated to what extent dropout intentions and dropout can be predicted by an interplay between negative life events, general self-efficacy, and perceived social support. We distinguished between time-averaged levels of self-efficacy and social support, and within-person change in self-efficacy and social support over time. This enabled us to establish whether dropout intentions and dropout were sensitive to fluctuations in perceived self-efficacy and social support over time when controlling for person-specific levels of these psychosocial resources. Calculating multilevel models with data from a prospective cohort study (N = 4,956, 43 male), we found that negative life events were significantly associated with an increase in dropout intentions and the likelihood of school dropout. Furthermore, time-averaged levels of self-efficacy and social support, and a within-person (situational) increase in these characteristics relative to their time-averaged levels, were related to lower levels of dropout intentions but did not prevent dropout. The positive relationship between negative life events and dropout intentions was attenuated for individuals who perceived higher levels of self-efficacy than usual. Our findings suggest future research should further investigate time-averaged and situational psychosocial drivers of school dropout in combination. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2019 APA, all rights reserved) [less ▲]

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See detailConscious Experience and Psychological Consequences of Awake Craniotomy
Hejrati, N.; Spieler, D.; Samuel, Robin UL et al

in World Neurosurgery (2019)

Background Experiencing cranial surgery under awake conditions may expose patients to considerable psychological strain. Methods This study aimed to investigate the occurrence and course of psychological ... [more ▼]

Background Experiencing cranial surgery under awake conditions may expose patients to considerable psychological strain. Methods This study aimed to investigate the occurrence and course of psychological sequelae following awake craniotomy (AC) for brain tumors in a series of 20 patients using a broad, validated psychological assessment pre-, intra-, postoperatively and a standardized follow-up of 3 months. In addition, the association of the preoperative psychological condition (including, but not limited to, anxiety and fear) with perioperative pain perception and interference was assessed. Results AC did not induce any shift in the median levels of anxiety, depression, and stress symptoms already present prior to the procedure. Furthermore, anxiety and depression were all moderately to strongly associated over time (all p<0.05). Stress symptoms also correlated positively over all times of measurement. Stress three days after surgery was strongly associated with stress three months after surgery (p<0.001), while the correlation between pre- and immediate postoperative stress showed a statistical trend (p=0.07). Preoperative fear was not related to intraoperative pain, but to pain and its interference with daily activity on the third postoperative day (p<0.001 and p<0.01, respectively). Conclusion Postoperative psychological symptoms clearly correlated with their corresponding preoperative symptoms. Thus, mental health was not negatively affected by the awake craniotomy experience in our series. Intraoperative fear and pain were not related to the preoperative psychological condition. However, preoperative fear and anxiety were positively related with pain and its interference with daily activity in the immediate postoperative period [less ▲]

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