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See detailExamining variables of the job context as predictors of nurses’ demand appraisals
Fernandez de Henestrosa, Martha UL; Sischka, Philipp UL; Steffgen, Georges UL

Scientific Conference (2023, May 26)

Research goals: The present study examined whether (a) time-related factors of the job context, namely working time and job tenure, predict nurses’ challenge/hindrance appraisals alongside job demands ... [more ▼]

Research goals: The present study examined whether (a) time-related factors of the job context, namely working time and job tenure, predict nurses’ challenge/hindrance appraisals alongside job demands themselves, and whether (b) both factors might act as boundary conditions of nurses’ workplace stressor appraisals. Theoretical background: Based on the transactional theory of stress (Lazarus & Folkman, 1984), studies have so far examined employees’ subjective evaluations of workplace stressors as challenging and/or hindering and their associations to different well-being outcomes (e.g., Webster et al., 2011). Although these studies have helped us to get a more nuanced insight into work-related demands and how they may affect employees, little is known on the question of whether the job context itself might shape how employees experience certain workplace stressors (LePine, 2022). Yet, knowing whether contextual factors of the job might impact employees’ stress appraisal may help us to handle the negative effects of such job stressors (LePine, 2022). Thus, the current study aimed to investigate the role specific contextual variables of the job play as regards to nurses’ subjective appraisals of job demands as challenges and/or hindrances. Design/Methodology/Approach/Intervention: The current study was conducted as part of a broad scientific project on nurses’ working conditions in Luxemburg. Cross-sectional data was collected via an online survey (French/German). The effective sample consisted of 460 nurses (76.9 % female, n = 352; Mage = 39.40, SDage = 9.95). Statistical analyses were performed using IBM SPSS (version 25) and the PROCESS macro for SPSS (Hayes, 2018). To examine the associations between job demands, contextual variables and appraisals, a total of four simple moderation analyses (Model#2; Hayes, 2018) were conducted with challenge and hindrance appraisal as the criterion variables. Per criterion variable we performed two moderation analyses (i.e., one including time pressure as predictor, one including emotional demands as predictor). Working time and job tenure were specified as the moderator variables and were jointly introduced into the regression models. Predictor and moderator variables were mean centered prior analysis. Results: Regression analyses showed that time pressure and emotional demands significantly related to their challenge (for time pressure: b = -.19, p < .001; for emotional demands: b = -.11, p < .05) and hindrance appraisals (for time pressure: b = .33, p <.001; for emotional demands: b = .32, p < .001). Moreover, job tenure significantly predicted nurses’ appraisal of time pressure as challenging (b = -.001, p < .05). In other words, an increased job tenure went along with a decreased perception of time pressure as challenging. Yet, working time did not significantly predict nurses’ appraisals of job demands (i.e., time pressure, emotional demands). Furthermore, we did not detect significant interaction effects. Limitations: The current study focused on two time-related factors of the job context (job tenure and working time) as predictors of nurses’ appraisals. Yet, other contextual factors of the job (e.g., shift work, breaks) might affect how employees appraise certain demands. Moreover, we implemented a cross-sectional design precluding a causal interpretation. Conclusions: The current research identified time-related, contextual factors of the job, which contribute to how nurses appraise specific job demands. Results suggest that nurses with a higher job tenure experience time pressure at work as less of a challenge. This might suggest that they may be better at coping/dealing with time pressure at work than their colleagues with fewer years working in nursing. Note, however, that nurses’ self-reported working time was unrelated to their challenge and hindrance appraisals of job demands. These findings suggest that scholars might need to adopt a more differentiated perspective when conducting research on time-related, contextual factors of the job and their role within the stress appraisal process. [less ▲]

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See detailTowards a further Understanding on the Nature and Psychological Effects of Job Demands: Examining the Challenge-Hindrance-Threat Distinction of Job Demands, Demand Appraisals and the Role of Job Resources
Fernandez de Henestrosa, Martha UL

Doctoral thesis (2023)

The experience of work-related stress and ill-/health is of major concern for employers and organizations in the European Union (EU-OSHA, 2022). From an occupational health perspective, work-related ... [more ▼]

The experience of work-related stress and ill-/health is of major concern for employers and organizations in the European Union (EU-OSHA, 2022). From an occupational health perspective, work-related stress is expected to result from employees’ exposure to certain psychological and social characteristics of the work, so called job demands, which are presumed to lead to diminished health and performance among employees (Eurofound & EU-OSHA, 2014). To explain associations between such job characteristics and employees’ health, scholars have generally relied on prominent theoretical frameworks, such as the Job Demands-Resources model (JD-R; Bakker & Demerouti, 2017). Although the JD-R model has successfully contributed to the prediction of work-related health and motivational outcomes in the past years, it has also resulted in a number of unresolved issues (Bakker & Demerouti, 2017). Drawing on multiple theoretical frameworks, the present dissertation examined in greater detail inconsistencies related to the nature and functioning of job demands; and in doing so, aimed to provide a further understanding on work-related demands and their psychological effects. The present thesis encompasses three published articles and addresses open research avenues as regards to (i) the categorization of job demands, (ii) the cognitive appraisal of job demands, and (iii) organizational determinants of demand appraisal. A review of the occupational health literature revealed that most research conducted on the categorization of work-related demands continues to apply a two-fold differentiation of job demands (i.e., Challenge-Hindrance framework, Cavanaugh et al., 2000). However, a more differentiated approach to distinguish between different types of job demands has recently been introduced (i.e., Challenge-Hindrance-Threat framework; Tuckey et al., 2015). Few studies have been conducted on Tuckey et al.'s (2015) extended dimensionality of workplace stressors (e.g., Espedido & Searle, 2018) and not much is known on how job threats, job hindrances and job challenges relate to well-being outcomes, once job resources (i.e., motivational aspects of the job) are taking into account. Therefore, the first aim of the present dissertation (i.e., Article 1) was to examine Tuckey et al.'s (2015) expanded dimensionality of workplace stressors within the JD-R framework by analyzing job threats, job hindrances and job challenges alongside job resources. Results from a heterogenous occupational sample of Luxemburgish employees supported the distinctiveness of Tuckey et al.'s (2015) threefold differentiation of job demands based on their associations with well-being outcomes, while accounting for the effects of job resources. Results further corroborated the health-impairing nature of job threats, job hindrances and job challenges, and supported the motivational nature of job resources. Contrary to expectations, job challenges did not relate to employees’ experiences of vigor. Prior research has often relied on classification frameworks to categorize job demands a priori and to explain their effects (Mellupe, 2020). However, a more recent stream of research has moved towards the examination of employees’ subjective evaluations (i.e., appraisals) of work-related demands (LePine, 2022). Although first studies examining employees’ appraisal of job demands have yielded promising insights into the nature of work-related demands, research does not yet consider appraisal in a systematic manner (Li et al., 2019). In addition, scholars have exclusively considered primary appraisal (i.e., motivational relevance of the stressor) when examining job demands and their associated effects, thereby ignoring the notion of secondary appraisal (i.e., individuals’ assessment to cope with the stressor; Lazarus & Folkman, 1984; Podsakoff et al., 2023). To address these limitations, and taking into account previous findings on the well-being of nurses during the Covid-19 pandemic (e.g., Mo et al., 2020), the second aim of the present dissertation (i.e., Article 2) was to examine how nursing professionals appraise job demand during the health crisis, and to analyze the predictive contribution of nurses’ secondary appraisal of job demands in view of their proximal affective responses. Results from a sample of nursing professionals working in Luxembourg indicated that secondary appraisal was the most important predictor of nurses’ affective states. In addition, negative affective states were predicted by threat appraisals and job demands (i.e., time pressure, emotional demands), whereas positive affect was predicted by challenge appraisals of emotional and physical demands. Results further showed that emotional and physical demands were exclusively appraised as threatening, whereas time pressure associated with challenge and threat appraisal. Lastly, a literature review revealed that not much is known about which organizational factors might contribute to employees’ demand appraisals (LePine, 2022). Therefore, the third aim of the present dissertation (i.e., Article 3) was to investigate determinants and possible boundary conditions of nurses’ demand appraisals among matching job resources. Results showed that corresponding job resources predicted challenge appraisals of job demands. Regarding the prediction of threat appraisal, with the exception of social support, all proposed job resources significantly associated with nurses’ threat appraisal of corresponding job demands. Contrary to expectations, job resources did not moderate the associations between matching job demands and their respective challenge/threat appraisals. In sum, findings of the present dissertation highlight the importance (i) to adopt a threefold understanding of job demands (i.e., challenges, hindrance, threats) while taking into account job resources, (ii) to consider secondary appraisals alongside job demands and their primary appraisals, and (iii) to consider matching job resources as organizational determinants of challenge and threat appraisals. These findings may serve to guide occupational health interventions strategies. [less ▲]

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See detailChallenge, threat, coping potential: How primary and secondary appraisals of job demands predict nurses' affective states during the COVID- 19 pandemic
Fernandez de Henestrosa, Martha UL; Sischka, Philipp UL; Steffgen, Georges UL

in Nursing Open (2023), 0(0), 1-14

Aim: The COVID-19 pandemic has led to a rapid raise of work-related stress among nurses, affecting their emotional well-being. This study examined how nurses appraise job demands (i.e. time pressure ... [more ▼]

Aim: The COVID-19 pandemic has led to a rapid raise of work-related stress among nurses, affecting their emotional well-being. This study examined how nurses appraise job demands (i.e. time pressure, emotional demands and physical demands) during the pandemic, and how primary (i.e. challenge and threat) and secondary appraisals (i.e. coping potential) of job demands predict nurses' affective states (i.e. positive affect, anger and anxiety). Design: A cross- sectional online survey. Methods: 419 nurses completed self-report measures of job demands and related appraisals. Data analyses comprised correlation analysis, factor analysis, hierarchical linear regression analysis and dominance analysis. Results: Emotional and physical demands correlated exclusively with threat appraisal, while time pressure correlated with challenge and threat appraisal. Time pressure, emotional demands and threat appraisals of job demands predicted negative affective states, while challenge appraisals of emotional and physical demands predicted positive affect. Coping potential was identified as the most important predictor variable of nurses' affective states. Public Contribution: The current study identified statistically significant risk and protective factors in view of nurses' affective states experienced during the COVID- 19 pandemic. [less ▲]

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See detailExamining the challenge-hindrance-threat distinction of job demands alongside job resources.
Fernandez de Henestrosa, Martha UL; Sischka, Philipp UL; Steffgen, Georges UL

in Frontiers in Psychology (2023), 14(1011815),

Purpose: Previous research conducted on the Job Demands-Resources model has mostly ignored the newly introduced Challenge-Hindrance-Threat distinction of workplace stressors. Thus, to better understand ... [more ▼]

Purpose: Previous research conducted on the Job Demands-Resources model has mostly ignored the newly introduced Challenge-Hindrance-Threat distinction of workplace stressors. Thus, to better understand the nature of job demands, the present study aimed to explore this distinction of job demands within the framework of the Job Demands-Resources model. Moreover, it examined competing theoretical frameworks by investigating the associations between job characteristics and psychological health variables (i.e., burnout, vigor). Design/methodology/approach: Data were collected via computer assisted telephone interview among a representative sample of employees working in Luxembourg (n = 1,506). Findings: Structural Equation Modeling supported the distinctiveness of the proposed demand categories in terms of their effects. The health impairing nature of threats, hindrances, and challenges, as well as the motivational potential of resources was supported. Yet, scarce support was found for the moderating effects of demands and resources on employees’ well-being. Research implications: Based on these findings, we argue for an extended framework of job characteristics, which will more accurately describe their nature and effects on employees. Practical implications: In order to promote employee’s well-being, occupational health advisors need to be aware of the distinct demand-wellbeing relations when implementing job redesign measures. Originality/value: Combining multiple theoretical frameworks is considered a leading principle in occupational health research. The present study implements an extended classification framework of workplace stressors into one of today’s most influential theoretical framework of job characteristics. [less ▲]

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See detailPredicting Challenge and Threat Appraisal of Job Demands among Nurses: The Role of Matching Job Resources
Fernandez de Henestrosa, Martha UL; Sischka, Philipp UL; Steffgen, Georges UL

in International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health (2023), 20(2), 1288

(1) Background: Empirical studies have started to examine employees’ subjective appraisals of job demands and their relations to employees’ health. However, knowledge of working conditions, which might ... [more ▼]

(1) Background: Empirical studies have started to examine employees’ subjective appraisals of job demands and their relations to employees’ health. However, knowledge of working conditions, which might contribute to how employees appraise specific job demands, is scarce. The present study aimed to examine predictors of nurses’ appraisals of job demands (i.e., time pressure, emotional demands, physical demands, and role ambiguity) as challenges and/or threats among corresponding job resources (i.e., autonomy, social support, physical resources, participation in decision-making). It also examined moderating effects of these predictors. (2) Methods: Cross-sectional data were collected via an online survey in a sample of 425 nurses working in Luxembourg. (3) Results: Multiple regression analyses indicated that matching job resources predicted nurses’ appraisal of job demands as challenging. Threat appraisal was predicted by three out of four kinds of job resources (i.e., autonomy, physical resources, participation in decision-making). However, the current study did not find any moderating effects between job demands and job resources on challenge/threat appraisals. (4) Conclusions: The present study identified domain-specific job resources that contribute to how employees perceive selected job demands. Accordingly, we encourage scholars and practitioners to align job demands with matching job resources to prevent nurses’ threat appraisal of job demands, and to promote their challenge appraisals. [less ▲]

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See detailQuality of Work and Quality of Employment Profiles and their longitudinal impact on well-being
Sischka, Philipp UL; Fernandez de Henestrosa, Martha UL; Steffgen, Georges UL

Scientific Conference (2022, July 06)

Many studies on job quality operationalize job quality as a composite indicator (Munoz de Bustillo et al., 2011) and investigate its link with different well-being outcomes or investigate the incremental ... [more ▼]

Many studies on job quality operationalize job quality as a composite indicator (Munoz de Bustillo et al., 2011) and investigate its link with different well-being outcomes or investigate the incremental effects of specific job characteristics on well-being. However, these variable-centered approaches on job quality ignore the fact that certain job characteristic configurations cluster in specific employee groups (Van Aeren et al., 2014). Thus, the current longitudinal study employs a person-centered approach (i.e., latent profile and transition analysis (LPA/LTA), e.g., Spurk et al., 2020) to identify groups of employees that show different job characteristic profiles (over time). Data were collected via CATI or CAWI within a stratified random sample from Luxembourg’s working population (nWave 1 = 1,689; nWave 2 = 848). The survey contains eleven quality of work and six quality of employment dimensions that were used as indicators for the latent profile analysis. Moreover, the survey contains different mental health and work-related attitudinal outcomes. Fit indices and substantive interpretability/utility were jointly considered to determine the number of profiles. To explore the relationships between the latent categorical variable and the other variables, we followed the three-step procedure (e.g., Asparouhov & Muthén, 2014) LPA revealed five profiles, i.e., poor working conditions (1), medium working conditions, high work intensity (2), high working conditions, medium work intensity (3), high working conditions, high work intensity and physical demands (4), medium working conditions, low work intensity (5). Cross-sectionally, these profiles were meaningfully linked with mental and attitudinal outcomes. LTA suggests the stability of these profiles within one year, with varying impact depending on mental health and work-related attitudinal outcome. Scholars and policy makers need to be aware of job characteristic configurations. To promote employee’s well-being organizations and policy makers need to redesign the ecological contexts of working conditions depending on its profiles. [less ▲]

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See detailLast Man Standing: Battle Royale Games Through the Lens of Self-Determination Theory
Fernandez de Henestrosa, Martha UL; Billieux, Joël; Melzer, André UL

in Games and Culture (2022), 0(0), 1-22

The highly popular video game genre of Battle Royale (BR) games is characterized by survival and exploration elements that feature a last-man-standing gameplay, thus, motivating players to be the final ... [more ▼]

The highly popular video game genre of Battle Royale (BR) games is characterized by survival and exploration elements that feature a last-man-standing gameplay, thus, motivating players to be the final contestant in the game. Drawing on the Self-Determination Theory the present study investigated the role of personal values, psychological needs and well-being in a self-selected sample of 303 BR gamers recruited online. The association between players’ value orientation and well-being was found contingent on players’ BR gaming experience and their need for relatedness. Whereas frequent interaction with this game genre was associated with the basic psychological need satisfaction of autonomy and relatedness, player preference for BR games was related to their need of competence and autonomy. The present study supports the importance of exploring player motives and provides initial insights into the association between BR gaming and basic psychological needs. [less ▲]

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See detailThe Job demands-resources model: A validation with employees working in Luxembourg
Fernandez de Henestrosa, Martha UL; Sischka, Philipp UL; Steffgen, Georges UL

Poster (2020, September 02)

Purpose: The present study aimed to validate the job demands-resources model (Bakker & Demerouti, 2017) among a representative sample of the worker population in Luxembourg. Moreover, our purpose was to ... [more ▼]

Purpose: The present study aimed to validate the job demands-resources model (Bakker & Demerouti, 2017) among a representative sample of the worker population in Luxembourg. Moreover, our purpose was to identify which specific job demands and resources contribute the most to burnout and work engagement, respectively. Design: Data were collected via computer assisted telephone and web interview in a large sample of 1689 employees working in Luxembourg (55.2% male, Mage = 44.1, SDage = 10.3). Most participants worked in academic professions (31.4%, n = 531), followed by technicians and associate professionals (24.0%, n = 406), clerical support workers (11.7%, n = 197) and others (32.86%, n = 555). We employed the Quality of Work Index – Luxembourg (QoWIL) to measure several areas of work, including work intensity, job design, physical and social conditions (Sischka & Steffgen, 2019). Additionally, different employment conditions were measured to get an indicator of the employment quality in Luxembourg. Findings: Results of latent moderated structural equation modelling (LMS) indicated a good fit of the model to the data, χ2(411) = 1738.017, RMSEA = .04 (95% CI = 0.04 - 0.05), CFI =.92, SRMR = .06. All job resources (i.e. social support, autonomy and job security) significantly predicted work engagement, whereas all demands (i.e. workplace mobbing, work-life inference, emotional demands) significantly predicted burnout. Particularly, social support was the most important resource (ß = .29, p < .001, R2 = 11.4%), followed by job security (ß = .17, p < .001, R2 = 3.9%) and autonomy (ß = .11, p < .001, R2 = 1.4%). Workplace mobbing explained the largest percentage of variance in burnout (ß =. 47, p < .001, R2 = 41.6%), followed by work home inference (ß = .30, p < .001, R2 = 13.0%) and emotional demands (ß = 15, p < .001, R2 = 2.2%). While burnout had a negative impact on job performance (ß = -18, p < .001), work engagement did not predict the latter (ß = .07, p > .05). Besides, only one out of nine hypothesized interaction effects had a significant effect on work engagement (i.e. social support x mobbing, ß = 0.15, p < .001) and on burnout (i.e. social support x emotional demands, ß = -0.08, p < .05). Conclusion: Whereas the present findings provided strong support for the motivational and health impairment processes proposed by the JDR model, we found limited support for the interaction hypotheses. The results outline the importance of social conditions in explaining employees’ health, illustrating important starting points for organizational interventions that aim to promote well-being. Contributions: While other studies have tested the propositions of the JDR model by focusing on different work sectors, the present study includes a more comprehensive range of occupations,classified according to the ISCO-08. Given its large data set, it provides enough statistical support to detect interaction effects and allows for the correction of measurement errors using LMS. Furthermore, it follows the parsimony principle by specifying the most important starting points for interventions across occupations. [less ▲]

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See detailThe Quality of Work Index and the Employment Quality Index: A multidimensional approach of job quality and its links to well-being at work
Steffgen, Georges UL; Sischka, Philipp UL; Fernandez de Henestrosa, Martha UL

in International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health (2020)

(1) Background: Job quality is a multidimensional and elusive concept that is back in vogue among social scientists and policymaker. The current study proposes a new job quality approach that is compared ... [more ▼]

(1) Background: Job quality is a multidimensional and elusive concept that is back in vogue among social scientists and policymaker. The current study proposes a new job quality approach that is compared with the EuropeanWorking Conditions Survey framework and structured with the help of the Job Demands-Resources model. Two new measures of job quality, the Quality ofWork Index (QoW) and the Quality of Employment Index (QoE) are developed and validated in three different languages (German, French, Luxembourgish). The QoW is composed of 43 items, focusing on four areas of work—work intensity, job design, social conditions, and physical conditions (subdivided in eleven components)—which are particularly important for employees’ well-being. The QoE is composed of 13 items that cover training opportunities, career advancement, job security, employability, work life conflict, and income satisfaction. (2) Methods: Data were collected via computer-assisted telephone interviews in a representative sample of 1522 employees working in Luxembourg (aged 17–67 years; 57.2% male). (3) Results: Confirmatory factor analysis confirmed the proposed factors structure and scalar measurement invariance for the three different language versions. Internal consistencies were satisfactory for all subscales (Cronbach’s Alpha between 0.70 and 0.87). Correlations and hierarchical regression analyses with different psychological health measures (i.e., burnout, general well-being, psychosomatic complaints, work satisfaction, vigor) and subjective work performance confirmed the construct validity of the new instruments. (4) Conclusions: The QoW and the QoE are globally and on the level of the sub-categories effective tools to measure job quality, which could be used to compare job quality between organizations and different countries. Furthermore, the current study confirms associations between the different components of the QoW and QoE and employees’ health. [less ▲]

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See detailErster Forschungsbericht zur Weiterentwicklung der „Enquête concernant la qualité de vie et la motivation au travail“.
Sischka, Philipp UL; Fernandez de Henestrosa, Martha UL; Steffgen, Georges UL

E-print/Working paper (2019)

Das Ministère de la Fonction publique et de la Réforme administrative hat 2017 eine Befragung mit dem Titel “Enquête concernant la qualité de vie et la motivation au travail” unter den Mitarbeitern des ... [more ▼]

Das Ministère de la Fonction publique et de la Réforme administrative hat 2017 eine Befragung mit dem Titel “Enquête concernant la qualité de vie et la motivation au travail” unter den Mitarbeitern des öffentlichen Dienstes durchgeführt. Die Universität Luxembourg wurde damit betraut, die psychometrische Qualität des Fragebogens zu prüfen, die Zusammenhänge zwischen den Gruppenvariablen zu untersuchen, die gruppenbezogene Vergleiche vorzulegen, die Befunde mit mit denen anderer Studien zu vergleichen sowie Handlungshinweise zur Optimierung der Arbeitsqualitàt vorzulegen (siehe Convention de recherche entre l‘Université du Luxembourg et le Minsitère de la Fonction Publique et de la Réforme administrative du 24. mai 2018). Entsprechend der Vorgaben der Konvention werden in dem vorliegenden ersten Bericht, die Befunde a) zu der psychometrischen Testung der Güte des aktuellen Erhebungsinstruments (Punkt 2.1.1 der Konvention), b) zu den gruppenbezogenen Vergleiche (Punkt 2.1.3, Satz 1 der Konvention) sowie c) zu den Zusammenängen zwischen den Gruppenvariablen (Punkt 2.1.2 der Konvention) vorgelegt. In einem ersten Schritt erfolgt zunächst eine Beschreibung der Items mittels verteilungsbe-schreibender Maßzahlen und Balkendiagramme, wobei die Items auch auf fehlende Werte un-tersucht werden. Ergebnisse der inhaltlichen und psychometrischen Itemprüfung zeigen, dass der Fragebogen z.T. noch wichtige Entwicklungsfelder aufweist. In einem zweiten Schritt werden exploratorische Faktorenanalysen durchgeführt, um einen Überblick über die Faktorstruktur des Fragebogens zu erhalten. Die Faktoranalysen erfolgen bezogen auf die einzelnen Themenblöcke (Zufriedenheit, Motivation, Wohlbefinden, Arbeits-bedingungen). Auf Basis der identifizierten Faktorstruktur wurden geeignete Items aus den vier Bereichen zu 17 Skalen zusammengefasst. In einem dritten Schritt erfolgt eine Analyse der internen Konsistenz der neu gebildeten Skalen. Zudem werden die Inter-Korrelationen dieser Skalen vorgelegt. Befunde zeigen, dass die meisten Skalen akzeptable bis exzellente Reliabilitätskoeffizienten aufweisen. Allerdings lassen sich erhöhte Inter-Korrelationen zwischen einigen Skalen identifizieren, die auf eine vorliegende Redundanz der Skalen deuten. In einem vierten Schritt werden gruppenbezogene Vergleiche hinsichtlich Geschlecht, Alters-gruppen, Beschäftigungssituation, Jahre im öffentlichen Dienst, Gehaltsgruppen, Anzahl Zusammenfassung II zugeordneter Mitarbeiter sowie Länge des Arbeitswegs zu den neu gebildeten Skalen durchgeführt und die Befunde präsentiert. Beispielsweise zeigen Mitarbeiter mit den wenigsten Jahren im öffentlichen Dienst tendenziell günstigere Werte hinsichtlich der vier Themenblöcke auf. In einem fünften Schritt werden Regressionsanalysen durchgeführt, um Zusammenhänge zwischen den Gruppenvariablen, Arbeitsbedingungen und den einzelnen Themenblöcken zu veranschaulichen. Die Befunde verdeutlichen, dass Zufriedenheit, Motivation und Wohl-befinden mit verschiedenen Arbeitsbedingungen assoziiert sind. In einem abschließenden Schritt wird das gesamte Erhebungsinstrument zusammenfassend diskutiert und Empfehlungen bezüglich der weiteren Entwicklung des Fragebogens und der Skalen gegeben. [less ▲]

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See detailThe Quality of Work Index Luxembourg (QoWIL): A multidimensional approach and its links to well-being at work.
Sischka, Philipp UL; Fernandez de Henestrosa, Martha UL; Steffgen, Georges UL

Scientific Conference (2019)

Quality of work is a very often used and complex concept. We will present a new conceptualization of quality of work, compare it with the European Working Conditions Survey framework to measure job ... [more ▼]

Quality of work is a very often used and complex concept. We will present a new conceptualization of quality of work, compare it with the European Working Conditions Survey framework to measure job quality (Eurofund, 2017), and structure it with the help of the Job Demands-Resources model (Bakker & Demerouti, 2017). Based on this conceptualization we developed and validated a new measure of quality of work, the Quality of Work Index – Luxembourg (QoWIL) in three different languages (German, French, Luxembourgish). The QoWIL is composed of 43 items, focusing on four areas of work – work intensity, job design, physical conditions, and social conditions (subdivided in eleven components) – which are particularly important for employees’ well-being. Data were collected via computer-assisted telephone interviews in a representative sample of 1,522 employees working in Luxembourg (aged 17–67 years; 57.2% male). Confirmatory factor analysis confirmed the proposed factors structure and scalar measurement invariance for the three different language versions. Internal consistencies were satisfactory for all subscales (Cronbach’s α between .70 and .87). Correlations and hierarchical regression analysis with different psychological health measures (i.e., burnout, general well-being, psychosomatic complaints, work satisfaction, vigor) and subjective work performance confirmed the construct validity of the new questionnaire. We conclude that the QoWIL is globally and on the level of the sub-categories an effective tool to measure work quality, which could be used to compare work quality between organizations and different countries. Furthermore, the current study confirms associations between the different components of quality of work and employees health. Therefore, this new tool allows to monitor and to benchmark quality of work and health outcomes and compare them with each other, across gender, age, nationality and work sector. [less ▲]

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See detailThe Effects of Sexualized Violence in Video Games on Rape Myth Acceptance
Fernandez de Henestrosa, Martha UL; Melzer, André UL

Scientific Conference (2017, May)

Previous research has tested the effects of video games on players’ Rape Myth Acceptance (RMA) with regard to either sexual or violent contents. The current study aimed at investigating the combined ... [more ▼]

Previous research has tested the effects of video games on players’ Rape Myth Acceptance (RMA) with regard to either sexual or violent contents. The current study aimed at investigating the combined effects of sexual and violent material in video games on players’ RMA. Participants (N = 82) played either a sexualized female game character or a non-sexualized female game character in a violent video game. Participants’ pre-gaming RMA, gender role attitudes and gaming habits were found to predict RMA after the gaming episode, but sexualized game violence did not. Furthermore, no gender differences were found with regard to RMA. The present findings corroborate the important role of pre-existing gender attitudes for the concept of RMA. In addition, future research should also focus on long-term exposure to video games and players’ gaming habits when examining the effects of sexualized violence in video games on RMA. [less ▲]

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