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See detailLusophone migration into Luxembourg
Tavares, Bernardino UL

E-print/Working paper (2021)

This is the third research brief in the DisPOSEG Project. DisPOSEG stands for “Disentangling postcolonial encounters in globalisation: a sociolinguistic-ethnographic study of Lusophone migrant workers’ ... [more ▼]

This is the third research brief in the DisPOSEG Project. DisPOSEG stands for “Disentangling postcolonial encounters in globalisation: a sociolinguistic-ethnographic study of Lusophone migrant workers’ positioning in third space,” a three-year CORE project funded by the FNR, Luxembourg. This multi-sited project contributes to the fields of postcolonialism, migration studies, sociolinguistics and workplace studies by investigating language, history and migration from Portuguese-speaking countries (Portugal and its former colonies) into Luxembourg, with a focus on migrants’ social, linguistic and work interactions. It problematises the relation between concomitant populations of those countries that form this dichotomic colonial matrix of former coloniser and former colonised, and their descendants in Luxembourg, a geographical spaces traditionally perceived as non-colonial. In this third research brief we review lusophone migration into Luxembourg. [less ▲]

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See detailRevisiting conceptual tools at the crossroad of postcolonial and sociolinguistic studies
Tavares, Bernardino UL; Tavares Vieira, Aleida Evandra UL

E-print/Working paper (2021)

This is the first research brief in the DisPOSEG Project. DisPOSEG stands for “Disentangling postcolonial encounters in globalisation: a sociolinguistic-ethnographic study of Lusophone migrant workers’ ... [more ▼]

This is the first research brief in the DisPOSEG Project. DisPOSEG stands for “Disentangling postcolonial encounters in globalisation: a sociolinguistic-ethnographic study of Lusophone migrant workers’ positioning in third space,” a three-year CORE project funded by the FNR, Luxembourg. This multi-sited project contributes to the fields of postcolonialism, migration studies, sociolinguistics and workplace studies by investigating language, history and migration from Portuguese-speaking countries (Portugal and its former colonies) into Luxembourg, with a focus on migrants’ work, social and linguistic interactions. It problematises interactions of/between concomitant populations of those countries that form this dichotomic colonial matrix of former coloniser and former colonised, and their descendants in Luxembourg, a geographical spaces traditionally perceived as non-colonial. In this first research brief we outline and revisit four interlinked key concepts guiding the project. [less ▲]

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See detailCompounding forms of inequality: Cape Verdean migrants' struggles in education and beyond in Luxembourg
Tavares, Bernardino UL

in European Journal of Applied Linguistics (2020), 8(2), 307-332

This paper seeks to show how language, combined with other social variables, exacerbates migrants’ and their descendants’ struggles at school and beyond in Luxembourg. To a certain extent, the official ... [more ▼]

This paper seeks to show how language, combined with other social variables, exacerbates migrants’ and their descendants’ struggles at school and beyond in Luxembourg. To a certain extent, the official trilingualism of Luxembourg – French, German and Luxembourgish – corresponds to an ‘elite multilingualism’ (Garrido 2017; Barakos and Selleck 2018) which defines who can access certain resources, e. g. education, work etc., and who can be left playing catch-up. The latter are those migrants who I here conceive as multilinguals on the margins. The elitist system is a form of domination and power over those whose language repertoire is less valued. Migrants’ disadvantage is further impacted by other indicators of their identity that can go beyond their educational qualifications and language repertoire per se, such as their country of origin, ethnicity, race, gender, citizenship etc. Language intersects with other forms of disadvantage or privileges. From an ethnographic sociolinguistic perspective, drawing on interviews and participant observations, this paper will illustrate this intersection of language, race and ethnicity, and struggles from the ground-level educational realities and aspirations of Cape Verdean migrants and their descendants in Luxembourg. This helps cast light on the social organisation in Luxembourg and understand the effects of multilingualism in creating ‘abyssal lines’ (Santos 2007) between the nationals, certain European migrants, Lusophone and African migrants in terms of social and economic mobility. [less ▲]

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See detailMultilingualism in Luxembourg:(Dis)empowering Cape Verdean migrants at work and beyond
Tavares, Bernardino UL

in International Journal of the Sociology of Language (2020), 2020(264), 95-114

This paper explores the entanglement of language with issues such as discrimination and the reproduction of social hierarchies. It unpacks this interplay to show how the use and abuse of language serve as ... [more ▼]

This paper explores the entanglement of language with issues such as discrimination and the reproduction of social hierarchies. It unpacks this interplay to show how the use and abuse of language serve as the main mechanism of inclusion, exclusion and limitation of migrants in the labour market, contributing to certain migrant groups and their descendants remaining in the bottom stratum of society. It investigates how language use can both empower and disqualify migrants, creating ethnic pools of work. This paper draws on interviews with a successful middle-aged Cape Verdean man, Pedrinhu, to illustrate this language impact. He came to Luxembourg at a young age and his sports skills helped him to be fast-tracked to acquire Luxembourgish citizenship. He talks about his migration trajectories, his sociolinguistic life and his job interactions with Cape Verdean workers at a private employment enterprise where he now holds a high position. He seeks “to empower” Cape Verdean migrants, challenging some of the institutionalised linguistic demands of the state employment agency he collaborates with; at the same time, he is aware of the reproduction of inequality and the ethnic stratification of his enterprise. The paper concludes by highlighting the ambivalences of multilingualism and empowerment interventions in accessing resources, such as work, in the condensed migration contexts of Luxembourg. [less ▲]

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See detailLanguage and (Im)mobility as a Struggle: Cape Verdean Trajectories into Luxembourg
Tavares, Bernardino UL; Juffermans, Kasper

in Multilingualism, (Im)mobilities and Spaces of Belonging (2019)

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See detailCape Verdean Migration Trajectories into Luxembourg: A Multisited Sociolinguistic Investigation
Tavares, Bernardino UL

Doctoral thesis (2018)

This thesis investigates Cape Verdean migration trajectories into Luxembourg from a multisited sociolinguistic point of view. Approaching migration as both emigration and immigration, the thesis examines ... [more ▼]

This thesis investigates Cape Verdean migration trajectories into Luxembourg from a multisited sociolinguistic point of view. Approaching migration as both emigration and immigration, the thesis examines sociolinguistic aspects of both aspiring and accomplished Cape Verdean migrants to Luxembourg. Based on a narrative and the material ethnography, the thesis seeks to understand migration and its inequalities from the colonial past to the current episode of globalisation. As a starting point, the thesis historicises Cape Verdean migration to Luxembourg as initially entangled in colonisation and labour policies. It has shown that, Cape Verdean movements to Luxembourg derived indirectly from Portuguese colonisation and unexpectedly meddled in Luxembourg foreign labour policies during the 1960s and 70s. This thesis explores this entanglement and unexpectedness of migration from the perspective of individual migrants. It explores what happened in between those points of departure and arrival by means of a multisited ethnographic linguistic landscape approach (MELLA). This approach consists of a material and narrative ethnography that studied traces of migrant presences and absences in public and private spaces on both ends of the trajectory. It was found that the linguistic landscape of Cape Verde contained numerous references to Luxembourg (e.g. Avenida Luxemburgo in Santo Antão) and vice versa (e.g. Epicerie Créole in Bonnevoie) and that some participants in the study, like myself, routinely went back and forth, sustaining relationships and engagements in both countries. However, findings also showed how unequal and exclusive South-North mobilities have become. It is obvious that as life in general is, South-North migration is a struggle, with language being a crucial dimension of this struggle. The thesis shows how migration is a struggle from the start in the country of origin with prospective migrants making considerable efforts and investments to travel North, often in vain, and continues to be a struggle for those who succeed to arrive North. Language duties are always demanded and migrants are constructed from a linguistic deficit perspective rather than addressing the systemic and structural conditions that contribute to unequal struggles among migrant groups and between the locals and migrants, intersecting with gender, class and race. This study provides an account of how multilingualism itself is also a struggle for Cape Verdeans, as Luxembourg’s trilingualism is often used as a gatekeeping device and as a proxy for race in a ‘colour-blind’ racism. It is my hope that this first book-length study of Cape Verdean migration to Luxembourg has opened a new empirical field of research, and will be followed by many more studies to come. [less ▲]

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See detailCommodification of language in migration and transnational contexts
Tavares, Bernardino UL

in Transnational Social Review (2017)

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See detailSouth-North trajectories and language repertoires
Juffermans, Kasper UL; Tavares, Bernardino UL

in Kerfoot, Caroline; Hyltenstam, Kenneth (Eds.) Entangled Discourses: South-North Orders of Visibility (2017)

This chapter explores language in global South-North migration from the perspective of aspiring migrants in Lusophone West Africa within the context of increasingly restrictive European immigration ... [more ▼]

This chapter explores language in global South-North migration from the perspective of aspiring migrants in Lusophone West Africa within the context of increasingly restrictive European immigration regimes and their consequence of involuntary immobility in the South. While sociolinguistic scholarship has successfully engaged with globalization, mobility, and movement of people, it has insufficiently engaged with that which and those who don’t travel well. We argue that a sociolinguistics of globalization needs to develop multi-sited methods and tools for investigating and understanding these absent presences – the invisibly excluded – and propose that repertoires and trajectories are useful tools in such undertaking. The paper attempts a theoretical review of these concepts and illustrates their analytical potential with three cases from ongoing fieldwork in Cape Verde and Guinea-Bissau as part of a larger ethnographic project at the University of Luxembourg that explores the language lives, learning histories, (unfinished) travels, further mobile aspirations and changing social status of young West Africans on the move. The paper concludes by arguing that South-North mobilities are shaped by as well as shaping multilingual repertoires, and are entangled in complex desires and strategies of mobility. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 244 (17 UL)
See detailTrajectories and repertoires as conceptual tools for a sociolinguistics of globalization
Juffermans, Kasper UL; Tavares, Bernardino UL

E-print/Working paper (2014)

This is the third in a series of research briefs in the STAR project. STAR stands for “Sociolinguistic trajectories and repertoires: Luso-Luxo-African identifications, interactions and imaginations”, and ... [more ▼]

This is the third in a series of research briefs in the STAR project. STAR stands for “Sociolinguistic trajectories and repertoires: Luso-Luxo-African identifications, interactions and imaginations”, and is a three-year CORE research project funded by FNR, Luxembourg. This multi-sited project contributes to the field of sociolinguistics of globalization by investigating language and migration between the global South (Cape Verde and Guinea Bissau) and North (Luxembourg) from the perspective of both accomplished and aspiring migrants. In this third research brief we outline the key conceptual concepts guiding the project, sociolinguistic trajectories and repertoires. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 255 (34 UL)
See detailLanguage and migration into Luxembourg
Tavares, Bernardino UL; Jurdana, Martin; Juffermans, Kasper UL

E-print/Working paper (2014)

This is the second in a series of research briefs in the STAR project. STAR stands for “Sociolinguistic trajectories and repertoires: Luso-Luxo-African identifications, interactions and imaginations”, and ... [more ▼]

This is the second in a series of research briefs in the STAR project. STAR stands for “Sociolinguistic trajectories and repertoires: Luso-Luxo-African identifications, interactions and imaginations”, and is a three-year CORE research project funded by FNR, Luxembourg. This multi-sited project contributes to the field of sociolinguistics of globalization by investigating language and migration between the global South (Cape Verde and Guinea Bissau) and the global North (Luxembourg) from the perspective of both accomplished and aspiring migrants. In this second research brief we outline sociolinguistic aspects of migration into Luxembourg, with a focus on its Lusophone population. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 237 (31 UL)
See detailMigration from West Africa, with special reference to Cape Verde and Guinea Bissau
Tavares, Bernardino UL; Juffermans, Kasper UL

E-print/Working paper (2014)

This is the first in a series of research briefs in the STAR project. STAR stands for “Sociolinguistic trajectories and repertoires: Luso-Luxo-African identifications, interactions and imaginations”, and ... [more ▼]

This is the first in a series of research briefs in the STAR project. STAR stands for “Sociolinguistic trajectories and repertoires: Luso-Luxo-African identifications, interactions and imaginations”, and is a 3-year CORE research project funded by FNR, Luxembourg. The multi-sited project, meant as contribution to the field of sociolinguistics of globalization, investigates language and migration between the global South (Cape Verde and Guinea Bissau) and North (Luxembourg) from the perspective of both accomplished and desired migrants. In this first research brief we review literature on flows of migration from West Africa. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 127 (14 UL)
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See detailThe Verbal System of the Cape Verdean Creole of Tarrafal, Santiago: A Semantic Analysis of the Tense, Mood and Aspect Markers
Tavares, Bernardino UL

Book published by Lincom Europa (2012)

This book deals with the verbal markers of tense, mood and aspect (TMA) in Cape Verdean Creole (CVC), focussing on the influence of context and time adverbials in determining the markers’ meaning. It is ... [more ▼]

This book deals with the verbal markers of tense, mood and aspect (TMA) in Cape Verdean Creole (CVC), focussing on the influence of context and time adverbials in determining the markers’ meaning. It is based on a corpus recorded in Fazenda, a small fishing community in the Tarrafal district of Santiago Island (cf. Appendix). CVC verbal markers have often been described in the literature but the present work shows that context, adverbials of time and intonation must also be considered to determine the verbal marker’s semantics. Chapter One outlines the role of Santiago Island in the genesis of CVC and presents the structure and methodology of this thesis. Chapter Two offers a review of the literature on TMA markers in CVC. These previous studies are discussed in chronological order and some new insights are offered. Chapter Three presents an analysis of the meaning of CVC verbs when they are unmarked, showing that stativity is crucially relevant and that many verbs can be stative in one context and non-stative in others. Thus, CVC verbs fall into three groups according to whether their unmarked form indicates present, past or both. Chapter Four presents the range of the functions of the marker ta with particular focus on its role in indicating habitual aspect. Chapter Five examines the following CVC progressive markers: (i) the markers sta ta and sta na focussing on the importance of the particles ta and na; (ii) the inland markers sata and ata; and (iii) the occurrence of ta in certain contexts with perception verbs indicating progressivity. Chapter Six offers a semantic and syntactic analysis of –ba (a suffixed anterior marker), dja (which can also be an adverb) and the least described verbal marker, al. Chapter Seven presents an exhaustive inventory of combination patterns involving all the markers referred to above, showing that there are strict rules concerning the markers’ position within verb phrase. Finally, Chapter Eight presents the main accomplishments of this thesis and suggests further research needed to help us better understand the CVC verb system, one of the most complex aspects of the language. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 181 (14 UL)