Results 1-20 of 137.
Bookmark and Share    
Full Text
See detailL’épreuve de la démocratie ou la démocratie à l’épreuve ?
Danescu, Elena UL

Article for general public (2021)

Considérée parmi les valeurs et principes universels et indivisibles, la démocratie fournit le cadre juste pour l’exercice et la protection des droits humain. C’est ainsi que les Nations Unies adoptent le ... [more ▼]

Considérée parmi les valeurs et principes universels et indivisibles, la démocratie fournit le cadre juste pour l’exercice et la protection des droits humain. C’est ainsi que les Nations Unies adoptent le 15 septembre 1997 la Déclaration universelle sur la démocratie, dont le 10e anniversaire donne lieu la Journée internationale de la démocratie, marquée chaque année depuis 2007, pour sensibiliser à ce sujet les gouvernements et citoyens du monde entier. Depuis 2020, la crise du Covid-19 avec ses défis sociaux, politiques et juridiques majeurs à l'échelle mondiale, ne cesse de mettre la démocratie à l’épreuve en attaquant certains de ses principes constitutifs, notamment la liberté, l’équité, la justice, l’état de droit. Une prise de conscience s’impose. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 19 (0 UL)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailDemocracy, Freedom and Truth at a Time of Digital Disruption: An equation with three unknowns?
Danescu, Elena UL

in IntechOpen (2021)

The pattern of a knowledge-based society relies to a large extent on digital technologies and intangible outputs and generate considerable transnational financial flows and gains. These technologies also ... [more ▼]

The pattern of a knowledge-based society relies to a large extent on digital technologies and intangible outputs and generate considerable transnational financial flows and gains. These technologies also play a key role in providing free access to data and information, encouraging citizen participation in public decision-making, fostering transparency and scrutiny of government action and mobilising new players capable of identifying alternative means of civic and political participation worldwide. At the same time, the increasingly impact of online platforms in manipulating transnational public debates, and the surge in extremist groups using the digital ecosystem to incite hatred, hostility and violence are a warning sign that these modes of communication may be having an adverse effect on democracy and that the boundary between fact and fiction is not as clear as we may like to think. The US presidential election campaign and the Brexit referendum (2016), the theories about COVID-19 (that have flooded the web since 2019), the terrorist attack against French teacher Samuel Paty (16 October 2020) all highlight these trends. When the majority of the world’s citizens are using online media as their main source of information, the proliferation of disinformation and the related threat of radicalism and extremism have led to a growing awareness of these issues at international- and European Union level. What can be done to tackle the situation? How should the democratic states with new forms of private power in the algorithmic society? Where should the line be drawn between freedom of expression and media pluralism on the one hand, and intrusion and censorship of dissenting opinions on the other? How should information be defended as a fundamental right? Is there a moral or ethical code when it comes to information? How can be created an environment that is conducive to inclusive, pluralistic public debate? How to equip citizens to develop a critical approach and to take informed decisions? How to balance innovation with the need to ensure transparency and fairness? Could we be witnessing a situation in which algorithms are “dissolving” democracy? Drawing on the archives of the international and European multilateral organisations (UN/UNESCO, Council of Europe, the Organisation for Security and Cooperation in Europe, the European Union) and several public and private stakeholders worldwide, this chapter proposes: a) to take stock of the issues and challenges raised by the proliferation of fake news, social media and algorithms, and their impact on freedom and democracy; b) to review the regulatory provisions implemented in this area at European and international level; and c) to identify future prospects. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 94 (4 UL)
Full Text
See detailL’émergence de la nouvelle diplomatie luxembourgeoise - enjeux, stratégies, personnalités
Danescu, Elena UL; Schroeder, Corinne; Schmit, Paul et al

Presentation (2021, June 30)

Dans le contexte des nouvelles relations internationales forgées par la Seconde Guerre mondiale, le Grand-Duché de Luxembourg s’affirme comme un acteur de marque du multilatéralisme, en tant que membre ... [more ▼]

Dans le contexte des nouvelles relations internationales forgées par la Seconde Guerre mondiale, le Grand-Duché de Luxembourg s’affirme comme un acteur de marque du multilatéralisme, en tant que membre fondateur de la plupart des grandes institutions internationales - l’Organisation des Nations unies (1945), l’Organisation du traité de l’Atlantique du Nord (1949), le Conseil de l’Europe (1949),- ainsi que de l’intégration européenne, à commencer par la Communauté européenne du Charbon et de l’Acier (1951), dont les premières institutions sont accueillies à Luxembourg. L’adhésion aux systèmes d’alliances atlantique et européennes s’accompagne d’une nouvelle politique extérieure luxembourgeoise sous l’impulsion du légendaire ministre des Affaires étrangères Joseph Bech (1887-1975). Après la Libération, il porte une attention particulière à l’organisation institutionnelle du ministère des Affaires étrangères, à la professionnalisation de la diplomatie nationale et à la formation d’un corps diplomatique d’excellence, pour représenter le pays dans le monde, pour promouvoir ses valeurs et pour défendre ses intérêts à travers la coopération internationale bi- et multilatérale. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 22 (0 UL)
Full Text
See detailLuxembourg: from steel to the knowledge economy and beyond
Danescu, Elena UL; Clément, Franz; Golini, Sonia

Presentation (2021, June 22)

Despite its small size in terms of geography (2,586km2) and population (626,100 people on 1 January 2020), Luxembourg has an open, dynamic, innovative economy that is one of the most successful at ... [more ▼]

Despite its small size in terms of geography (2,586km2) and population (626,100 people on 1 January 2020), Luxembourg has an open, dynamic, innovative economy that is one of the most successful at international level – in 2019 its GDP per capita was 261% the European average and its growth rate was the third highest of the EU’s then 28 Member States – and also one of the least affected by the COVID-19 crisis. This can be explained by its sector-based structure, in which activities and services related to the financial centre, together with information and communication technologies, transport and non-market services, play a key role; by the existence of a highly qualified, multilingual, mobile (cross-border) workforce; and also by the proactive economic policy pursued by the country’s authorities throughout its history. Looking back, we can see that Luxembourg has gone through several transitions and dealt with a number of serious crises. Following on from the predominantly rural economy of the 19th century, the first half of the 20th century was characterised by an industrial economy based on the iron and steel industry and the latter part of the century by a service-based economy centred around the financial centre, ultimately leading to the emergence of an information and knowledge economy which is gradually taking shape in the 21st century. References. 1)STATEC (2021), “Luxembourg in figures, 2020”. Source: https://statistiques.public.lu/catalogue-publications/luxembourg-en-chiffres/2020/luxembourg-figures.pdf; 2). To find out more about the historical development of the Luxembourg economy, see Gérard Trausch (2012), “Les mutations économiques et sociales de la société luxembourgeoise depuis la révolution française [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 37 (1 UL)
Full Text
See detailTHE ORIGINS OF THE EUROPEAN IDEA - LOOKING BACK TO LEAP FORWARD
Danescu, Elena UL

Presentation (2021, May 29)

Abstract_THE ORIGINS OF THE EUROPEAN IDEA Despite its historical divisions, Europe was built on a shared set of ideas, ranging from Greco-Latin humanism to the principles of the French Revolution. Before ... [more ▼]

Abstract_THE ORIGINS OF THE EUROPEAN IDEA Despite its historical divisions, Europe was built on a shared set of ideas, ranging from Greco-Latin humanism to the principles of the French Revolution. Before the people of Europe achieved the unification of their continent by the force of law, several other figures – emperors, princes and conquerors – envisaged a single space “ruled by one Crown”. Over the centuries, many philosophers, writers and legal experts developed theories on the rapprochement of the peoples of Europe. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 8 (0 UL)
Full Text
See detailLuxembourg, la première capitale de l’Europe unie
Danescu, Elena UL; Pallage, Stéphane UL; Bettel, Xavier et al

Presentation (2021, May 06)

Préfigurée par la Déclaration que Robert Schuman prononce le 9 mai 1950, la Communauté européenne du Charbon et de l’Acier (CECA) devient réalité le 18 avril 1951, lorsque les représentants de six États ... [more ▼]

Préfigurée par la Déclaration que Robert Schuman prononce le 9 mai 1950, la Communauté européenne du Charbon et de l’Acier (CECA) devient réalité le 18 avril 1951, lorsque les représentants de six États fondateurs – Allemagne, Belgique, France, Italie, Luxembourg et Pays-Bas – concluent, pour une durée de 50 ans, le traité de Paris. L’architecture institutionnelle de cette première communauté européenne dessine l’actuel équilibre des pouvoirs de l’Union européenne reposant sur: la Haute Autorité (la Commission européenne) ; le Conseil spécial de ministres; l’Assemblée commune (le Parlement européen); la Cour de justice – indépendante. En juillet 1952, Luxembourg-ville est choisie comme lieu de travail provisoire de la CECA. Dès le 10 août 1952, la Haute Autorité s’installe dans le bâtiment qui abrite ac-tuellement la Spuerkeess. Le 10 décembre, la Cour de justice de la CECA tient sa séance d’ouverture solennelle au Cercle Municipal, à la place d’Armes. Luxembourg-ville devient siège européen aux côtés de Strasbourg (qui accueille l’Assemblée commune) et de Bruxelles, qui s’y rajoute en 1958, après la création de la Communauté économique européenne et l’Euratom. La fusion des exécutifs com-munautaires (1965) confirme Luxembourg comme siège judiciaire et financier européen. Ce n’est qu’en 1992 que le Conseil européen d’Édimbourg consacre la tripolarité Luxembourg – Bruxelles – Strasbourg comme « capitales permanentes de l’Union européenne. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 22 (1 UL)
Full Text
See detailRomania and Luxembourg – Connecting Memory, Sharing History
Danescu, Elena UL

Presentation (2021, April 24)

In spite of their fondamental geopolitical differences and their contrasting trajectories through the history, modern-day Romania and Luxembourg have always enjoyed a unique relationship, which started in ... [more ▼]

In spite of their fondamental geopolitical differences and their contrasting trajectories through the history, modern-day Romania and Luxembourg have always enjoyed a unique relationship, which started in the 12th century, when a number of Siebenbürger Sachsen could migrate eastwards (in Transylvania). A second migratory movement occurs in the 18th century when inhabitants of the then Duchy of Luxembourg set off towards the Danubian plains (the Banat of Timisoara), establishing themselves as settlers on this land previously conquered by the Habsburgs from the Turks and today part of Romania. Bilateral diplomatic relations between Romania and Luxembourg were first established on 8 December 1920, and in 1966 their respective diplomatic representations were elevated to the rank of embassy. After the fall of the communist regime, the democratic government of Romania appointed, in 1990, its first resident ambassador in Luxembourg. During its gradual integration into the Euro-Atlantic structures (EU, NATO), Romania and Luxembourg increase their synergies in a bi- and multilateral international framework. Moreover, on 5 April 2005, Romania (and Bulgaria) signed the EU accession treaty in Luxembourg, under the Luxembourg Presidency of the Council of the European Union. Taking into account these elements, and also the fact that Romania and Luxembourg (both, independent and sovereign nation-states) are subjects of the international relations and diplomacy process, this lecture aims to present a insightful foray into a long-centuries common history, by highlighting moments, events and key-figures on both-sides, by means of several undisclosed and unpublished archival documents provided courtesy of the Diplomatic Archives of Romania. (A brief presentation of definitions, concepts and notions specific to the international relations and diplomacy field will ensure a better understanding of the subject). [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 13 (1 UL)
Full Text
See detailLuxembourg Diplomacy at Work
Danescu, Elena UL; Wurth, Hubert; Gomes Samuel, Manuel et al

Speeches/Talks (2021)

After the Second World War, Luxembourg became a leading player in international relations. As a founding member of most of the major international institutions – including the United Nations (1945), the ... [more ▼]

After the Second World War, Luxembourg became a leading player in international relations. As a founding member of most of the major international institutions – including the United Nations (1945), the North Atlantic Treaty Organisation (1949), the Council of Europe (1949), the European Communities (starting with the European Coal and Steel Community in 1951) and then the European Union (1993) –, Luxembourg assumed a key role in European integration and multilateralism. Its constant aim has always been to maintain and strengthen the framework of international law as a basis for democracy, human rights and the values of freedom, peace and security worldwide. Luxembourg’s diplomatic apparatus serves the people of Luxembourg, the country’s institutions, the private sector and civil society by supporting and defending Luxembourg’s political, economic, business, cultural and consular interests abroad. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 60 (5 UL)
Full Text
See detailQuand l’Europe emménageait au Luxembourg
Danescu, Elena UL

Article for general public (2021)

Lorsque le 9 mai 1950, le ministre français des Affaires étrangères (natif du Luxembourg) Robert Schuman (1886-1963) énonce ce que l’Histoire retiendra comme la « Déclaration Schuman » et propose la ... [more ▼]

Lorsque le 9 mai 1950, le ministre français des Affaires étrangères (natif du Luxembourg) Robert Schuman (1886-1963) énonce ce que l’Histoire retiendra comme la « Déclaration Schuman » et propose la création d’une Communauté européenne du charbon et de l'acier (CECA) réunissant les ennemies héréditaires d’antan - la France et l’Allemagne - personne n’imaginait que cette initiative censée forger une paix durable en Europe allait se concrétiser en moins d’un an. Et pourtant, la première Communauté européenne devient réalité le 18 avril 1951, lorsque les représentants de six pays - Robert Schuman (France), Konrad Adenauer (RFA), Paul van Zeeland et Joseph Meurice (Belgique), le comte Carlo Sforza (Italie), Dirk Stikker et Jan Van den Brink (Pays-Bas) et Joseph Bech (Luxembourg) – concluent le traité de Paris. Le traité CECA d’il y a 70 ans, presque jour pour jour, signifie le début du destin européen du Grand-Duché en tant qu’État fondateur et acteur de marque de la construction européenne, et de Luxembourg-ville, en tant que « première capitale de l’Europe ». [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 45 (2 UL)
Full Text
See detailThe Belgium-Luxembourg Economic Union (BLEU) Lessons from the past, future prospects
Danescu, Elena UL

Speeches/Talks (2021)

The Belgium-Luxembourg Economic Union (BLEU) was established on 25 July 1921. Some years later, in 1935, three additional sections were added to the BLEU Convention: on financial and monetary matters, a ... [more ▼]

The Belgium-Luxembourg Economic Union (BLEU) was established on 25 July 1921. Some years later, in 1935, three additional sections were added to the BLEU Convention: on financial and monetary matters, a common trade regime and a “special revenue community” with specific excise duties. In 1963, the provisions of the BLEU were revised following the entry into force of the European Economic Community (EEC) and Benelux. The two countries renewed the Convention in a new enhanced version on 18 December 2002, reflecting a determination to extend their collaboration beyond the economic and monetary field and paving the way for closer political and administrative cooperation, especially in the areas of justice, citizenship, health and cross-border synergies in the Greater Region, and creating a framework for dialogue within the European Union. For one century now, Belgium and Luxembourg have enjoyed a strong bilateral partnership, one that has been marked by various difficulties and tensions but has been deepened and renewed over the years. The centenary of the BLEU, which occurs in a context beset by unprecedented challenges and uncertainties for the Greater Region, Europe and the international community, is an opportunity for discussion and reflection on the lessons that can be learned from the past, the current situation and prospects for the future of this union. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 80 (1 UL)
Full Text
See detailLe genre et l'Europe: Quo Vadis?
Danescu, Elena UL

Article for general public (2021)

L'égalité des genres est un principe fondateur de l'Union européenne (UE) inscrit dans les traités et constamment réaffirmé (Protocole social annexé au Traité de Maastricht, Traité d'Amsterdam, Charte ... [more ▼]

L'égalité des genres est un principe fondateur de l'Union européenne (UE) inscrit dans les traités et constamment réaffirmé (Protocole social annexé au Traité de Maastricht, Traité d'Amsterdam, Charte sociale européenne, Charte européenne des droits fondamentaux). Même si des progrès notables restent à accomplir, l’Europe démocratique constitue une source d’inspiration en matière de l'égalité entre les sexes et le développement des sociétés plus ouvertes et modernes. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 43 (2 UL)
Full Text
See detailWriting the Contemporary History of Europe: Old Concepts, New Tools?
Danescu, Elena UL; Itzel, Constanze; Douglas, McCarthy et al

Speeches/Talks (2021)

Although the idea of Europe dates back to ancient times and was crystallised in the Enlightenment, the plan for European unification emerged in the second half of the 20th century as a consequence of an ... [more ▼]

Although the idea of Europe dates back to ancient times and was crystallised in the Enlightenment, the plan for European unification emerged in the second half of the 20th century as a consequence of an economic process based on a single market and a single currency. European integration is therefore a recent chapter in the history of Europe, one which has been written before our very eyes, but it remains fragmented into disparate national histories. In the 21st century, those writing the history of Europe find themselves confronted with a threefold challenge: they must meet the demands of the digital age, adjust to the paradigm shift within the historical discipline and navigate the geopolitical upheavals that the continent has been experiencing since 1989 (the fall of communism; the enlargement of the European Union; the many crises the EU has faced, including Brexit; the divide between institutions and citizens; the socio-economic consequences of the global crisis, including the COVID-19 health crisis; the new nature of transatlantic relations, etc.). [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 87 (3 UL)
See detailRule of Law, Democracy and the EU-East enlargement:Case Study on Hungary and Poland
Danescu, Elena UL

Presentation (2021, January 18)

The European Communities (founded in 1951) with the ECSC and then the European Union started out as an exclusively west European enterprise. The guarantee of the “rule of law” was one of the criteria for ... [more ▼]

The European Communities (founded in 1951) with the ECSC and then the European Union started out as an exclusively west European enterprise. The guarantee of the “rule of law” was one of the criteria for accession to the European Union which the EU defined at the Copenhagen European Council in 1993, together with stability of institutions guaranteeing democracy, human rights, and respect for and protection of minorities. the existence of a functioning market economy as well as the capacity to cope with competitive pressure and market forces within the Union. Membership presupposes the candidate's ability to take on the obligations of membership including adherence to the aims of political, economic and monetary union. In their Constitutions today, all the countries of Central and East Europe confess to the “rule of law” as either a fundamental prerequisite or one of the highest values/a fundamental value of the constitutional order as stated (by Czech Republic, Slovakia, Slovenia, Poland), or by declaring their country operates under or is based on the “rule of law” as stated (by the Baltic countries, Hungary), or that it is a “law-governed state” as stated by (Bulgaria; Romania). In doing so, the countries confess to the “rule of law” at least in its formalistic understanding.The crucial question is what the “rule of law” as referred to by the EU in the Copenhagen Criteria and by the Constitutions of the countries of Central and Eastern Europe effectively means. What is the state practice? [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 96 (2 UL)
Full Text
See detailBREXIT: état des lieux
Danescu, Elena UL; Esposito, Marie-Claude; Da Silva, Joana

Speeches/Talks (2020)

Au 31 janvier 2020 à minuit (heure de Bruxelles), le Royaume-Uni a quitté l'Union européenne. Cette sortie n'est pourtant pas totale : conformément à l’accord de retrait, le pays est entré dans une ... [more ▼]

Au 31 janvier 2020 à minuit (heure de Bruxelles), le Royaume-Uni a quitté l'Union européenne. Cette sortie n'est pourtant pas totale : conformément à l’accord de retrait, le pays est entré dans une transition qui lui permet de négocier sa future relation avec l’UE, tout en restant provisoirement intégré à un certain nombre de politiques européennes. Cette phase doit prendre fin au 31 décembre 2020 au plus tôt, mais les pourparlers semblent actuellement en impasse. S’il demeure la conséquence directe du référendum organisé le 23 juin 2016 par l’ancien Premier Ministre David Cameron, le « Brexit » reflète de longues décennies de rapports tumultueux avec l’Europe supranationale, qui ont nourri l’euroscepticisme et anti-européenisme des Britanniques.[...] [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 16 (1 UL)
Full Text
See detailL'Europe des droits fondamentaux
Danescu, Elena UL

Article for general public (2020)

Sept décennies après la signature de la Convention européenne des droits de l’homme (Rome, 4 novembre 1950) et vingt ans après la proclamation la Charte des droits fondamentaux de l’Union européenne (Nice ... [more ▼]

Sept décennies après la signature de la Convention européenne des droits de l’homme (Rome, 4 novembre 1950) et vingt ans après la proclamation la Charte des droits fondamentaux de l’Union européenne (Nice, 7 décembre 2000), la sauvegarde des libertés fondamentales et de l’État de droit mis en cause par certains État membres se trouvent parmi les défis majeurs de l’Europe. À l’heure ou l’Union cherche des réponses pour contrecarrer les atteintes portées à son socle des valeurs communes, un regard rétrospectif sur la problématique européenne des libertés et droits fondamentaux permettra de mieux comprendre la gravité des enjeux actuels. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 49 (2 UL)
Full Text
See detailOn the origins of the European idea
Danescu, Elena UL; Leboutte, René; Da Silva, Joana

Speeches/Talks (2020)

Puisant ses racines dans l’antiquité gréco-romaine, forgeant sa teneur dès l’apparition des premiers États-nations au Moyen-Âge, et se profilant de manière résolue à l’époque contemporaine, l’idée ... [more ▼]

Puisant ses racines dans l’antiquité gréco-romaine, forgeant sa teneur dès l’apparition des premiers États-nations au Moyen-Âge, et se profilant de manière résolue à l’époque contemporaine, l’idée européenne s’est effectivement concrétisée au XXe siècle. Avant qu’elle ne devienne un véritable projet politique, l’idée européenne est restée limitée au cercle des visionnaires, qui ambitionnaient de préserver la paix par la construction d’une Europe unie. Ces projets intellectuels sont restés souvent utopiques, tant que les puissances politiques ne les prenaient pas en charge. [...] [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 28 (2 UL)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailLuxembourg Economy Facing Challenges: A Historical Overview
Danescu, Elena UL

in Hartley (Ed.) Western Europe 2021 (2020)

The chapter focused on Luxembourg economy and history will endeavour to explain how Luxembourg managed to achieve transitions from an agrarian economy to a knowledge-driven economy; its current strengths ... [more ▼]

The chapter focused on Luxembourg economy and history will endeavour to explain how Luxembourg managed to achieve transitions from an agrarian economy to a knowledge-driven economy; its current strengths and weaknesses; and its future challenges in an increasingly globalized, competitive international environment [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 57 (4 UL)
See detailEU Blind Date avec Isabel Wiseler-Lima et Sébastien Varrette
Danescu, Elena UL; Da Silva, Joana

Speeches/Talks (2020)

La place du Luxembourg et de l'Europe dans la stratégie des nouvelles technologies, dans le développement 'software', notre dépendance de l’Asie en matière de 'hardware', mais également l'intelligence ... [more ▼]

La place du Luxembourg et de l'Europe dans la stratégie des nouvelles technologies, dans le développement 'software', notre dépendance de l’Asie en matière de 'hardware', mais également l'intelligence artificielle, ses règles et son éthique, la place des femmes dans les métiers de recherche en informatique, ne sont que quelques sujets abordés lors de cette découverte mutuelle. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 25 (1 UL)
Full Text
See detailThe Future of Money in the Digital Age
Brand, Claus; Danescu, Elena UL

Scientific Conference (2020, October 09)

Research Seminar “The Future of Money in the Digital Age" (Blockchain and Cryptocurrencies. Digital Currencies vs Sovereign Currencies: Potential Implications for the Economic and Monetary Union.)

Detailed reference viewed: 73 (1 UL)
Full Text
See detailCrunch time for EMU
Danescu, Elena UL; Thygesen, Niels; Sapir, André et al

Speeches/Talks (2020)

As we mark the 50th anniversary of the Werner Report, it is well worth analysing the role of Economic and Monetary Union at a time of uncertainty as to the wider European project, via an interdisciplinary ... [more ▼]

As we mark the 50th anniversary of the Werner Report, it is well worth analysing the role of Economic and Monetary Union at a time of uncertainty as to the wider European project, via an interdisciplinary approach that draws on historical and archive research and takes into consideration the theoretical debates in the literature and the various methodological challenges.What are the multifaceted future provocation facing Economic and Monetary Union? What steps still need to be taken to complete the project? How can we strengthen the international role of the euro and bolster Europe’s economic and financial autonomy? How can we best tackle technological developments in the field of money and finance? And how is the COVID-19 crisis testing the boundaries of the European integration? [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 119 (2 UL)