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See detailMeeting Designers Where They Are: Using Industry Events as a Research Venue for HCI and Design Methods Development
Lockton, Dan; Lallemand, Carine UL

Scientific Conference (2020)

There is much work in the CHI community about the ‘industry-academia divide’, and how to bridge it. One key crossover between HCI/UX scientists and practitioners is the development and use of tools and ... [more ▼]

There is much work in the CHI community about the ‘industry-academia divide’, and how to bridge it. One key crossover between HCI/UX scientists and practitioners is the development and use of tools and methods—boundary objects between academia and practice. Among other forms of collaboration, there is an underdeveloped opportunity for academics to make use of industry events (conferences, meetups, design jams) as a research venue in the context of tool and method development. This paper describes three cases from work in academia-industry engagement over the last decade, in which workshops or experiments have been run at industry events as a way of trialling and developing tools directly with practitioners. We discuss advantages of this approach and extract key insights and practical implications, highlighting how the CHI community might use this method more widely, gathering relevant research outcomes while contributing to knowledge exchange between academia and practice. [less ▲]

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See detailVisualizing Computer-Based Activity on Ambient Displays to Reduce Sedentary Behavior at Work
Brombacher, Hans; Ren, Xipei; Vos, Steven et al

in 32ND AUSTRALIAN CONFERENCE ON HUMAN-COMPUTER INTERACTION (2020)

Workplace health interventions have predominantly been designed around visualizations of physical activity data in the work routine. Yet, contextual factors, such as computer-based activity, appears to be ... [more ▼]

Workplace health interventions have predominantly been designed around visualizations of physical activity data in the work routine. Yet, contextual factors, such as computer-based activity, appears to be crucial to support healthier behaviors at work. In this research, we explore the effect of visualizing computer-based activity to prompt physical activity at work, through desktop-based ambient displays. Based on our prototypes Yamin and Apphia, we conducted an exploratory qualitative user study in a lab setting with office workers (N=16). Results showed that visualizing one’s computer-based activity could potentially increase the awareness, self-reflection, and social interactions for individuals to become physically active. With our findings, we discuss design implications for using computer activity data in a physical form as a motivational factor to encourage physically active workstyles. We present directions for future field studies to gain further insights on this topic. [less ▲]

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See detailWhich App to Choose? An Online Tool that Supports the Decision-making Process of Recreational Runners to Choose an App
Janssen, Mark; Lallemand, Carine UL; Hoes, Kevin et al

in Proceedings of the 6th International Conference on Design4Health Amsterdam 2020 (2020)

In recent years, there has been an exponential increase in the use of health and sports-related smartphone applications (apps). This is also reflected in App-stores, which are stacked with thousands of ... [more ▼]

In recent years, there has been an exponential increase in the use of health and sports-related smartphone applications (apps). This is also reflected in App-stores, which are stacked with thousands of health- and sports-apps, with new apps launched each day. These apps have great potential to monitor and support people’s physical activity and health. For users, however, it is difficult to know which app suits their needs. In this paper, we present an online tool that supports the decision-making process for choosing an appropriate app. We constructed and validated a screening instrument to assess app content quality, together with the assessment of users’ needs. Both served as input for building the tool through various iterations with prototypes and user tests. This resulted in an online tool which relies on app content quality scores to match the users’ needs with apps that score high in the screening instrument on those particular needs. Users can add new apps to the database via the screening instrument, making the tool self supportive and future proof. A feedback loop allows users to give feedback on the recommended app and how well it meets their needs. This feedback is added to the database and used in future filtering and recommendations. The principles used can be applied to other areas of sports, physical activity and health to help users to select an app that suits their needs. Potentially increasing the long-term use of apps to monitor and to support physical activity and health. [less ▲]

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See detailIvy: A qualitative interface to reduce sedentary behavior in the office context
Menheere, Daphne; Damen, Ida; Lallemand, Carine UL et al

in DIS 2020 Companion - Companion Publication of the 2020 ACM Designing Interactive Systems Conference (2020)

This paper describes Ivy, an office chair that represents sitting time of an office worker through growing ivy strands. The longer one sits, the more strands will grow onto the chair. By means of a ... [more ▼]

This paper describes Ivy, an office chair that represents sitting time of an office worker through growing ivy strands. The longer one sits, the more strands will grow onto the chair. By means of a qualitative interface called Ivy, we illustrate a design approach that is currently underrepresented in sedentary behavior interventions. With this approach, we counter the current trend of digitalization and quantification of health interventions. Instead of graphs and numbers, Ivy uses data physicalization as a qualitative interface that represents sitting. We describe the design, the process, and future research steps of Ivy as a critical perspective on sedentary behavior interventions. We aim to spark discussion amongst designers and researchers in the field of Human-Computer Interaction to use qualitative interfaces as a promising approach to deepen the user's relationship with the targeted behavior and enrich the ability to construct meaning from the feedback. © 2020 Owner/Author. [less ▲]

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See detailIvy: Reading a critical design for sedentary behavior in the office context
Damen, Ida; Menheere, Daphne; Lallemand, Carine UL et al

in DIS 2020 Companion - Companion Publication of the 2020 ACM Designing Interactive Systems Conference (2020)

In this paper, we present and discuss Ivy, a critical artifact offering a novel design perspective on interventions that aim to reduce sedentary behavior in office workers. Ivy is an interactive office ... [more ▼]

In this paper, we present and discuss Ivy, a critical artifact offering a novel design perspective on interventions that aim to reduce sedentary behavior in office workers. Ivy is an interactive office chair that represents the amount of sitting time through growing ivy strands. Using the matrix of common argument types by Bardzell et al., we propose a structured "reading" of Ivy, as an example supporting reasoned and accessible conversations about criticality in design. Our reading of Ivy emphasized that its criticality emerges mainly from data physicalization as a new form of interactivity intended to trigger reflectiveness. The insights of this design study contribute towards a critical perspective on designing interventions to reduce sedentary time and spark discussion amongst designers and researchers in the field of Human-Computer Interaction. © 2020 Owner/Author. [less ▲]

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See detailThe Runner's Journey: Identifying Design Opportunities for Running Motivation Technology
Menheere, Daphne; Lallemand, Carine UL; Van Der Spek, Erik et al

in ACM International Conference Proceeding Series (2020)

Running is a popular recreational sport, yet for many amateur runners it remains challenging to turn intentions into sustainable running behavior. Although the market offers a myriad of running-related ... [more ▼]

Running is a popular recreational sport, yet for many amateur runners it remains challenging to turn intentions into sustainable running behavior. Although the market offers a myriad of running-related devices that aim to motivate runners, these often focus on the training itself and not on overcoming the barriers experienced prior to the run. A better understanding of these barriers to running is essential to identify design opportunities for technologies supporting amateur runners. We conducted two complementary studies among participants of a women-only running event. Combining an online survey (N = 114) and a journey mapping activity (N = 13), we investigated the influence of motivational barriers and enablers in runners' rituals. Based on our findings, we created the Runner's Journey, a visual narrative highlighting actionable design opportunities for running motivation technology. We propose five design recommendations to overcome barriers among amateur runners. © 2020 ACM. [less ▲]

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See detailUnderstanding Walking Meetings: Drivers and Barriers
Damen, Ida; Lallemand, Carine UL; Brankaert, Rens et al

Scientific Conference (2020)

There is increased interest in reducing sedentary behavior of office workers to combat the negative health effects of prolonged sitting. Walking meetings offer a promising solution to this problem as they ... [more ▼]

There is increased interest in reducing sedentary behavior of office workers to combat the negative health effects of prolonged sitting. Walking meetings offer a promising solution to this problem as they facilitate a physically active way of working. To inform future development of technologies supporting these type of meetings, in-depth qualitative insights into people’s experiences of walking meetings are needed. We conducted semi-structured walking interviews (N=16) to identify key drivers and barriers for walking meetings in a living lab setting by using the ‘WorkWalk’. The ‘WorkWalk’ is a 1.8 km walking route indicated by a dotted blue line with outdoor meeting points, integrated into the room booking system. Our findings provide insights into how walking meetings are experienced and affect the set-up and social dynamics of meetings. We propose design recommendations for the development of future technologies and service design elements to support walking meetings and active ways of working. [less ▲]

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See detailA Scoping Review of Digital Tools to Reduce Physical Inactivity in Knowledge Workers
Damen, Ida; Brombacher, Hans; Lallemand, Carine UL et al

in International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health (2020), 17(2),

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See detailHow Do Runners Experience Personalization of Their Training Scheme: The Inspirun E-Coach?
Janssen, Mark; Goudsmit, Jos; Lauwerijssen, Coen et al

in Sensors (2020), 20(16),

Among runners, there is a high drop-out rate due to injuries and loss of motivation. These runners often lack personalized guidance and support. While there is much potential for sports apps to act as (e ... [more ▼]

Among runners, there is a high drop-out rate due to injuries and loss of motivation. These runners often lack personalized guidance and support. While there is much potential for sports apps to act as (e-)coaches to help these runners to avoid injuries, set goals, and maintain good intentions, most available running apps primarily focus on persuasive design features like monitoring, they offer few or no features that support personalized guidance (e.g., personalized training schemes). Therefore, we give a detailed description of the working mechanism of Inspirun e-Coach app and on how this app uses a personalized coaching approach with automatic adaptation of training schemes based on biofeedback and GPS-data. We also share insights into how end-users experience this working mechanism. The primary conclusion of this study is that the working mechanism (if provided with accurate data) automatically adapts training sessions to the runners' physical workload and stimulates runners' goal perception, motivation, and experienced personalization. With this mechanism, we attempted to make optimal use of the potential of wearable technology to support the large group of novice or less experienced runners and that by providing insight in our working mechanisms, it can be applied in other technologies, wearables, and types of sports. [less ▲]

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See detailRunner's Perceptions of Reasons to Quit Running: Influence of Gender, Age and Running-Related Characteristics.
Menheere, Daphne; Janssen, Mark; Funk, Mathias et al

in International journal of environmental research and public health (2020), 17(17),

Physical inactivity has become a major public health concern and, consequently, the awareness of striving for a healthy lifestyle has increased. As a result, the popularity of recreational sports, such as ... [more ▼]

Physical inactivity has become a major public health concern and, consequently, the awareness of striving for a healthy lifestyle has increased. As a result, the popularity of recreational sports, such as running, has increased. Running is known for its low threshold to start and its attractiveness for a heterogeneous group of people. Yet, one can still observe high drop-out rates among (novice) runners. To understand the reasons for drop-out as perceived by runners, we investigate potential reasons to quit running among short distance runners (5 km and 10 km) (n = 898). Data used in this study were drawn from the standardized online Eindhoven Running Survey 2016 (ERS16). Binary logistic regressions were used to investigate the relation between reasons to quit running and different variables like socio-demographic variables, running habits and attitudes, interests, and opinions (AIOs) on running. Our results indicate that, not only people of different gender and age show significant differences in perceived reasons to quit running, also running habits, (e.g., running context and frequency) and AIOs are related to perceived reasons to quit running too. With insights into these related variables, potential drop-out reasons could help health professionals in understanding and lowering drop-out rates among recreational runners. [less ▲]

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See detailA Diary Study on the Exercise Intention-Behaviour Gap: Implications for the Design of Interactive Products
Menheere, Daphne; Funk, Matthias; van der Spek, Erik et al

in DRS International Conference 2020 (2020)

Increasingly aware of the importance of active lifestyles, many people intend to exercise more. One of the main challenges is to translate exercise intentions into actual exercise behaviour, the so-called ... [more ▼]

Increasingly aware of the importance of active lifestyles, many people intend to exercise more. One of the main challenges is to translate exercise intentions into actual exercise behaviour, the so-called intention-behaviour gap. To investigate barriers and enablers that affect this gap, we conducted a 7-day diary study with 16 participants. In this study, participants indicated what their exercise intentions and behaviour were per day, and whether and why they changed retrospectively during the day. Through the diary study, we gain insights into (i) the intention-behaviour interplay, and (ii) the experienced barriers and enablers that influence this interplay throughout the day. Based on the findings, we contribute new implications for design in supporting people translating their intentions into exercise behaviour, and propose three design concepts as examples. In these, the focus is on positively influencing the interplay of enablers and barriers of exercising and how these can be exemplified through design. [less ▲]

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See detailThe office jungle: A vision for wildness to turn offices into jungles
Nieuweboer, I.; Damen, I.; Brombacher, H. et al

in DIS 2020 Companion - Companion Publication of the 2020 ACM Designing Interactive Systems Conference (2020)

The Office Jungle is an experimental office environment designed to make offices more "wild". Through this demonstration and associated design vision, we make a first attempt to reflect on and to define ... [more ▼]

The Office Jungle is an experimental office environment designed to make offices more "wild". Through this demonstration and associated design vision, we make a first attempt to reflect on and to define what characterizes wildness and how it could empower people in more playful and active lifestyles, particularly in the workplace. In our understanding, wildness is not an exclusive property of nature, but rather a condition that can be designed for. How wildness can be designed is described here in a set of design principles called "Design for Wildness", inspired by the work of Gibson. The Office Jungle, a large geodesic sphere of 2 meters in diameter, is part and parcel of these design principles and can be used as a tool to design other wild environments. Such environments could benefit people working in the office, many of whom have been suffering the consequences of a sedentary lifestyle. © 2020 Owner/Author. [less ▲]

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See detailThe hub: Facilitating walking meetings through a network of interactive devices
Damen, Ida; Kok, Anika; Vink, Bas et al

in DIS 2020 Companion - Companion Publication of the 2020 ACM Designing Interactive Systems Conference (2020)

Walking meetings are a promising means to improve healthy behavior at work. By providing a physically active way of working, walking meetings can reduce our sitting time. Several obstacles that limit the ... [more ▼]

Walking meetings are a promising means to improve healthy behavior at work. By providing a physically active way of working, walking meetings can reduce our sitting time. Several obstacles that limit the social acceptance and wider adoption of walking meeting practice have been highlighted in previous research. Amongst these, the difficulty to take notes or present files is a recurring concern for office workers. To address these barriers, we designed the Hub, a network of stand-up meeting stations that accommodate different work-related tasks during walking meetings. We report on two pilot user tests investigating users' experiences and ideas for improvement, and present future research steps. We discuss the usefulness and relevance of the Hub concept to overcome the obstacles associated with walking meetings. © 2020 Owner/Author. [less ▲]

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See detailPositionPeak: Stimulating position changes during meetings
Damen, Ida; Heerkens, Lidewij; Van Den Broek, Annabel et al

in Proceedings of Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems (2020)

In office environments, workers spend the majority of their workday sitting in a static position behind a desk or around a meeting table. Prolonged sitting time and sedentary behavior have severe negative ... [more ▼]

In office environments, workers spend the majority of their workday sitting in a static position behind a desk or around a meeting table. Prolonged sitting time and sedentary behavior have severe negative health effects. Through this explorative study, we studied how different postures can be stimulated during meetings. We designed PositionPeak: three pieces of furniture aimed at composing a 'dynamic meeting room', subtly encouraging participants to avoid static postures. We video-recorded 5 meetings (N=16) and coded the number of position changes per participant. Participants also filled out a pre- and post-questionnaire about their experience. Our findings show that PositionPeak triggers people to adopt a variety of postures. Participants on average experienced a more efficient meeting but reported physical discomfort with some objects. We discuss the influence of PositionPeak on the meetings' social dynamics, the acceptance of new conventions and design recommendations for new meeting facilities. © 2020 Owner/Author. [less ▲]

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See detailFaye: An Empathy Probe to Investigate Motivation Among Novice Runners
Menheere, D.; Lallemand, Carine UL; Funk, M. et al

in Communications in Computer and Information Science (2020), 1294

The popularity of recreational sports such as running, has increased substantially due to its low threshold to start and it is attractive for a wide range of people. However, despite the growing ... [more ▼]

The popularity of recreational sports such as running, has increased substantially due to its low threshold to start and it is attractive for a wide range of people. However, despite the growing popularity, running has a high drop-out rate due to injuries and motivational loss, especially among novice runners. To investigate factors influencing motivation among novice runners and design opportunities, we deployed an empathy probe at a women-only running event. Faye is a running shirt that reveals motivational feedback on the shirt, during the warm-up phase of the run. In this paper, we both inform on the impact of motivational feedback while warming up on running motivation and reflect on the use of an empathy probe to investigate motivational strategies among novice runners. © 2020, Springer Nature Switzerland AG. [less ▲]

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See detailHow Acceptable Is This? How User Experience Factors Can Broaden our Understanding of the Acceptance of Privacy Trade-Offs
Distler, Verena UL; Lallemand, Carine UL; Koenig, Vincent UL

in Computers in Human Behavior (2019)

Privacy is a timely topic that is increasingly scrutinized in the public eye. In spite of privacy and security breaches, people still frequently compromise their privacy in exchange for certain benefits ... [more ▼]

Privacy is a timely topic that is increasingly scrutinized in the public eye. In spite of privacy and security breaches, people still frequently compromise their privacy in exchange for certain benefits of a technology or a service. This study builds on both technology acceptance (TA) and user experience (UX) research in order to explore and build hypotheses regarding additional dimensions that might play a role in the acceptability of privacy tradeoffs that are not currently accounted for in TA models. Using four scenarios describing situations with potential privacy trade-offs, we conducted a focus group study with 8 groups of participants (N = 32). Our results suggest that factors influencing privacy trade-offs go beyond existing TA factors alone. A technology's perceived usefulness plays an important role, as well as dimensions related to context, previous experiences, perceived autonomy and the feeling of control over the data being shared. [less ▲]

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See detailMeaningful technology : à la recherche du sens perdu
Lallemand, Carine UL

Conference given outside the academic context (2019)

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See detailGraceful Interactions and Social Support as Motivational Design Strategies to Encourage Women in Exercising
Menheere, Daphne; Lallemand, Carine UL; Faber, Ilse et al

Scientific Conference (2019, November)

Increasingly aware of the importance of active lifestyles, many people intend to exercise more. Yet the main challenge remains to translate these intentions into action. Wearable devices supporting ... [more ▼]

Increasingly aware of the importance of active lifestyles, many people intend to exercise more. Yet the main challenge remains to translate these intentions into action. Wearable devices supporting exercise regrettably tend to adopt a one-size-fits-all approach by monitoring activity through quantified data as a motivation strategy. Since certain individuals are driven by social motives to exercise, less addressed through quantification, the impact of these devices on user experience and motivation is questionable. We contribute to the field by defining interaction attributes of graceful interactions in product design. We then embedded these in designing Grace, a piece of jewelry enabling women to share exercise intentions with friends to encourage social support. Instead of focusing on quantification, we rely on a qualitative approach using graceful interaction. Through this we extend the design space of sport-related wearables for women and inform how to design for exercise motivation through social support and graceful interactions. [less ▲]

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See detailUser Experience Design for E-Voting: How mental models align with security mechanisms
Zollinger, Marie-Laure UL; Distler, Verena UL; Roenne, Peter UL et al

in Electronic Voting (2019, October)

This paper presents a mobile application for vote-casting and vote-verification based on the Selene e-voting protocol and explains how it was developed and implemented using the User Experience Design ... [more ▼]

This paper presents a mobile application for vote-casting and vote-verification based on the Selene e-voting protocol and explains how it was developed and implemented using the User Experience Design process. The resulting interface was tested with 38 participants, and user experience data was collected via questionnaires and semi-structured interviews on user experience and perceived security. Results concerning the impact of displaying security mechanisms on UX were presented in a complementary paper. Here we expand on this analysis by studying the mental models revealed during the interviews and compare them with theoretical security notions. Finally, we propose a list of improvements for designs of future voting protocols. [less ▲]

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See detailExploring the value of user-generated app data to design and improve urban running environments
van Renswouw, Loes; Bogers, Sander; Lallemand, Carine UL et al

Scientific Conference (2019, October)

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