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See detailThe role of parental control practices in explaining children’s diet, activity and BMI
Brown, Kerry A.; Ogden, Jane; Vögele, Claus UL et al

in Appetite (2008), 50

This paper aimed to investigate which parents use which types of parenting control practices to manage their children's diets and to assess the impact of these practices on children's dietary patterns and ... [more ▼]

This paper aimed to investigate which parents use which types of parenting control practices to manage their children's diets and to assess the impact of these practices on children's dietary patterns and their BMI. A cross-sectional survey of 518 parents with children aged 4-7 years was carried out in 18 primary schools across the South of England. Measures included aspects of parental control practices and the child's diet. Results showed that older parents with a lower BMI and who were stay at home parents used more "snack overt control", "snack covert control" and "meal covert control" and those with more education used more covert control strategies. In contrast, male, non-white parents with younger children used more "pressure to eat". In terms of the children's diet, the results showed links between parental and child demographics and aspects of unhealthy and healthy food intake. In addition, links were also found for parental control practices. For example, eating more unhealthy snacks was related to less covert control and more pressure to eat, eating fruit and vegetables was related to higher levels of both overt and covert control over meals and less pressure to eat and being neophobic was related to less covert control over meals and more pressure to eat. The children's BMIs were unrelated to any variables measured in the study. [less ▲]

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See detailDaily hassles and emotional eating in obese adolescents under restricted dietary conditions – the role of ruminative thinking
Kubiak, Thomas; Vögele, Claus UL; Siering, Mareike et al

in Appetite (2008), 51

Emotional eating is conceptualized as eating in response to negative affect or distress and is discussed as a mechanism leading to eating binges. Recent evidence suggests that eating may not only be ... [more ▼]

Emotional eating is conceptualized as eating in response to negative affect or distress and is discussed as a mechanism leading to eating binges. Recent evidence suggests that eating may not only be triggered by negative affect, but also ruminative thinking. We report results of an experience sampling study examining the role of rumination for emotional eating in 16 obese adolescents (M=15.5 years, S.D.=1.4; range 14-17, body mass index M = 31.1 kgm(-2), S.D.=5.5) under restricted dietary conditions. We hypothesized that daily hassles type of stress predicted the individuals' desire to eat, with the predictive value further increased when negative affect and rumination were accounted for. The results of mixed regression modeling were in line with our predictions, suggesting a significant contribution of ruminative thinking to the mechanisms of negative affect induced eating. [less ▲]

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See detailElektrodermale Aktivität
Vögele, Claus UL

in Gauggel, S.; Herrmann, M. (Eds.) Handbuch der Neuro- und Biopsychologie (2007)

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See detailGesundheitsförderung und Gesundheitserziehung
Vögele, Claus UL

in Kerr, J.; Weitkunat, R.; Moretti, M. (Eds.) ABC der Verhaltensänderung (2007)

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See detailKardiovaskuläre Aktivität
Vögele, Claus UL

in Gauggel, S.; Herrmann, M. (Eds.) Handbuch der Neuro- und Biopsychologie (2007)

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See detailKardiovaskuläre Reaktivität und Bluthochdruck
Vögele, Claus UL

in Leupoldt, A.v.; Ritz, T. (Eds.) Verhaltensmedizin – Perspektiven aus Psychobiologie, Psychopathologie und klinischer Anwendung (2007)

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See detailSurgery
Vögele, Claus UL

in Ayers, S.; Baum, A.; McManus, C. (Eds.) et al Cambridge Handbook of Psychology, Health & Medicine (2007)

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See detailSurgery and stress
Vögele, Claus UL

in Fink, G. (Ed.) Encyclopedia of Stress, 3 (2007)

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See detailCue reactivity in male restrained eaters: the role of negative cognitions as predictors of food intake
Hilbert, Anja; Vögele, Claus UL; Himmelmann, Uta

in Eating and Weight Disorders (2007), 12

OBJECTIVE: While restrained eating is one of the most well-established risk factors of eating disorders in females, its role for eating disturbances in males remains largely unclear. The present study ... [more ▼]

OBJECTIVE: While restrained eating is one of the most well-established risk factors of eating disorders in females, its role for eating disturbances in males remains largely unclear. The present study investigates eating behaviour in response to food cues and negative cognitions in male restrained eaters. METHODS: Twenty-four restrained eaters and 21 unrestrained eaters volunteered in a cue reactivity experiment consisting of two exposure trials with and without response prevention. Food and macronutrient intake were monitored, and negative cognitions were assessed using a self-report cognition inventory. RESULTS: Male restrained eaters consumed a larger amount of food, specifically carbohydrates, than unrestrained eaters. This greater food intake was predicted by negative cognitions about self-esteem and occurred in restrained eaters who had reported binge eating episodes in the diagnostic interview. DISCUSSION: Results suggest marked cue reactivity in male restrained eaters with an increased risk of overeating in those who experience low situational self-esteem and who are binge eaters. [less ▲]

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See detailSexualverhalten
Vögele, Claus UL

in Lohaus, A.; Jerusalem, M.; Klein-Heßling, J. (Eds.) Gesundheitsförderung im Kindes- und Jugendalter (2006)

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See detailSport und körperliche Aktivität
Lippke, Sonja UL; Vögele, Claus UL

in Renneberg, B.; Hammelstein, P. (Eds.) Gesundheitspsychologie (2006)

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See detailErnährung, Über- und Untergewicht
Vögele, Claus UL; Ellrott, Thomas

in Lohaus, A.; Jerusalem, M.; Klein-Heßling, J. (Eds.) Gesundheitsförderung im Kindes- und Jugendalter (2006)

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See detailChronic illness as a stimulus to eupraxia in patient-centred medicine: The example of long-term diagnosis with HIV
Whitaker, Rupert; Vögele, Claus UL; McSherry, Kevin et al

in Chronic Illness (2006), 2

The biopsychosocial challenges of living with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) have changed over time and they dictate the need for relevant medical services. The meaning of an HIV diagnosis has moved ... [more ▼]

The biopsychosocial challenges of living with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) have changed over time and they dictate the need for relevant medical services. The meaning of an HIV diagnosis has moved from a terminal to a manageable condition with the development of antiretrovirals, bringing profound changes to the experience of living with HIV and the meaning and use of diagnostic labels. Six biological stage-related categories in the literature of psychological medicine of HIV are critiqued. Long-term HIV highlights the inadequacy of physician-centred, acute-care medicine in chronic illness and its exclusion of preventive, psychological and rehabilitative modalities. ‘Eupraxia’ is presented as a conceptual framework for chronic care medicine, referring to best practice, wellbeing, best interests, and (public) welfare, through facilitated but collaborative approaches. A public-centred service model is proposed, using idiographic assessment and treatment by clinicians as patient delegates (proxies), monitoring joined-up care, providing group-based biopsychosocial treatment, facilitating autonomous and self-managing behaviour by the public, removing professional and practice hierarchies, and implementing real-time clinical and managerial accountability with public ownership and involvement. This model is superior in its health- and cost-effectiveness but can only work within a nationalized system that focuses equally on standardized outcomes and evidential and personalized health outcomes. [less ▲]

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See detailBlood phobia with and without a history of fainting: disgust sensitivity does not explain the fainting response
Gerlach, Alexander L.; Spellmeyer, Gerd; Vögele, Claus UL et al

in Psychosomatic Medicine (2006), 68

Objective: Individuals diagnosed with blood-injury phobia respond to venipuncture with strong psychophysiological responses. We investigated whether disgust sensitivity contributes to the fainting ... [more ▼]

Objective: Individuals diagnosed with blood-injury phobia respond to venipuncture with strong psychophysiological responses. We investigated whether disgust sensitivity contributes to the fainting response and is associated with parasympathetic activation, as suggested by previous research. Methods: Twenty individuals diagnosed with blood-injury phobia (9 with a history of fainting to the sight of blood, 11 without such a fainting history) and 20 healthy controls were compared. Psychophysiological responses and self-report measures of anxiety, disgust, and embarrassment were monitored during rest, a paced breathing task, and venipuncture. In addition, trait disgust sensitivity and blood-injury fears were assessed. Results: Blood-injury phobics reported enhanced anxiety, disgust, and embarrassment during venipuncture. They also experienced heightened arousal, as indicated by heart rate, respiration rate, and minute ventilation. Blood-injury phobics without a fainting history tended toward higher anxiety and disgust scores. There was no evidence for increased parasympathetic activation in either blood-injury phobic subgroup or of an association of disgust and parasympathetic activation. Conclusion: The tendency to faint when exposed to blood-injury stimuli may suffice as a conditioning event leading into phobia, without specific involvement of disgust sensitivity and parasympathetic activation. [less ▲]

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See detailEducation
Vögele, Claus UL

in Kerr; Moretti, M.; Weitkunat, R. (Eds.) ABC of Behaviour Change (2005)

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See detailEtiology of Obesity
Vögele, Claus UL

in Munsch, S.; Beglinger, P. (Eds.) Obesity and Binge Eating Disorder (2005)

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See detailKinder und Heranwachsende mit HIV oder AIDS
Vögele, Claus UL

in Schlottke, P. F.; Silbereisen, R. K.; Schneider, S. (Eds.) et al Enzyklopädie der Psychologie,D/II/6: Störungen im Kindes- und Jugendalter (2005)

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See detailKörperliche Inaktivität als Risikofaktor für die Entstehung von Übergewicht
Vögele, Claus UL

in Stehle, P.; Matissek, R. (Eds.) Ernährung, Süßwaren und Lebensstil: eine interdisziplnäre Betrachtung (2005)

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See detailKörperbild, Diätverhalten und körperliche Aktivität bei 9-10 jährigen Kindern
Vögele, Claus UL; Woodward, Heidi

in Kindheit und Entwicklung (2005), 14

The aim of the present study was to investigate body dissatisfaction and eating attitudes and the moderating role of gender, parental influences, body-mass index (BMI), and physical activity in 9 ± 10 ... [more ▼]

The aim of the present study was to investigate body dissatisfaction and eating attitudes and the moderating role of gender, parental influences, body-mass index (BMI), and physical activity in 9 ± 10-year-old children. Sixty-eight 9 ± 10-year-old children (36 boys, 32 girls) were asked to indicate their perceived and ideal body size using the figure drawing scale of Childress et al. (1993). Physical activity levels were assessed with a diary method over 7 consecutive days. Questionnaires were used to collect information on children's eating habits and children's perception of parental weight, parental attitudes towards body size, and eating habits. Children's weight and height were measured and the BMI calculated. 44 % of boys and 34 % of girls wanted to be thinner than they perceived themselves to be. Multiple regression analyses indicated that this desire was predicted by children's BMI, perceived overweight of mother, and eating patterns indicating restraint eating style. Given that only 13 % were overweight, the percentage of children wanting to be thinner is of concern. The current results indicate that there may be an increasing trend for a thinner body ideal in boys compared to previous reports. [less ▲]

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See detailElemente der Konfrontationsbehandlung im Ernährungsmanagement und beim Umgang mit Heißhungerattacken bei Frauen mit Bulimia nervosa
Legenbauer, Tanja; Vögele, Claus UL

in Neudeck, P.; Wittchen, H.-U. (Eds.) Reader Konfrontationstherapie (2005)

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