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See detailBehavioral Medicine
Vögele, Claus UL

in Wright, James D. (Ed.) International Encyclopedia of the Social and Behavioral Sciences (2015)

Behavioral Medicine is the interdisciplinary field of study of behavior in health and disease. Based on often-experimental investigations of behavior, behavioral medicine contributes to a better ... [more ▼]

Behavioral Medicine is the interdisciplinary field of study of behavior in health and disease. Based on often-experimental investigations of behavior, behavioral medicine contributes to a better understanding of etiological factors and mechanisms, but also to clinical applications aimed at systematically improving health in clinical and at-risk populations. As the literature summarized in this chapter illustrates, behavioral medicine has shown tremendous progress in achieving these goals since its inception in 1977. Nevertheless, the successful translation of research results into clinical practice remains a challenge for the future. [less ▲]

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See detailPersonalized Medicine
Phillips, Robert; Vögele, Claus UL

in Wright, James D. (Ed.) International Encyclopedia of the Social and Behavioral Sciences (2015)

The rapid advances in medical science over the past two decades have already changed the way medicine is practiced, but the acceleration of advances suggests that health care systems worldwide are facing ... [more ▼]

The rapid advances in medical science over the past two decades have already changed the way medicine is practiced, but the acceleration of advances suggests that health care systems worldwide are facing a tsunami of new advances in understanding and in technology that will require radical reorganization of the health care system. The improved possibility of personalizing health care is one of the major drivers of change. Unfortunately, health care systems respond very slowly to innovation, and radical changes are almost impossible. In this article, we outline various changes that are expected to happen in the future in relation to personalized medicine, and discuss why behavioral scientists must participate in the reshaping of health care systems and the successful delivery of personalized care at the individual level. [less ▲]

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See detailDie Rolle von Persönlichkeitszügen für Gesundheit und Krankheit
Vögele, Claus UL

in Rief, Winfried; Henningsen, Peter (Eds.) Psychosomatik und Verhaltensmedizin: Eine Einführung in die Psychosomatische Medizin und Gesundheitspsychologie (2015)

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See detailGastrische Modulation der Schreckreaktion: eine prä-attentive Methode zur Abbildung afferenter Signale aus dem gastrointestinalen System
Schulz, André UL; Van Dyck, Zoé UL; Lutz, Annika UL et al

in Kaiser, J.; Fiebach, C. (Eds.) 41. Tagung Psychologie und Gehirn - Abstracts der Beiträge (2015)

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See detailInterozeptive Sensitivität bei Bulimia Nervosa und Binge-Eating-Störung
Van Dyck, Zoé UL; Schulz, André UL; Blechert, J. et al

in Kaiser, J.; Fiebach, C. (Eds.) 41. Tagung Psychologie und Gehirn - Abstracts der Beiträge (2015)

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See detailEmotions matter: Affektive und kardiale Modulation der Schreckreaktion
Schaan, Violetta UL; Schächinger, H.; Vögele, Claus UL et al

in Kaiser, J.; Fiebach, C. (Eds.) 41. Tagung Psychologie und Gehirn - Abstracts der Beiträge (2015)

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See detailWahrnehmung körperinterner Signale bei Bulimia Nervosa und Binge-Eating-Störung
Van Dyck, Zoé UL; Schulz, André UL; Blechert, J. et al

in Wittchen, H.-U.; Härtling, S.; Hoyer, J. (Eds.) Abstractband - Wieviel Psychologie steckt in der Psychotherapie? (2015)

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See detailZentralnervöse Verarbeitung von Körpersignalen bei Anorexia nervosa
Lutz, Annika UL; Schulz, André UL; Voderholzer, U. et al

in Kaiser, J.; Fiebach, C. (Eds.) 41. Tagung Psychologie und Gehirn - Abstracts der Beiträge (2015)

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See detailInteroception in anorexia nervosa: evidence at cortical and self-report levels
Lutz, Annika UL; Schulz, André UL; Voderholzer, Ulrich et al

in 45th Annual Congress of the European Association for Behavioural and Cognitive Therapies (EABCT) (2015)

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See detailInteroception and symptom reporting: Disentangling accuracy and bias.
Petersen, Sibylle UL; Van Staeyen, Ken; Vögele, Claus UL et al

in Frontiers in Psychology (2015)

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See detailGastrisch-evozierte Potenziale: ein neurophysiologischer Indikator für die kortikale Repräsentation afferenter Signale aus dem gastrointestinalen System
Schaan, L.; Van Dyck, Zoé UL; Lutz, Annika UL et al

in Kaiser, J.; Fiebach, C. (Eds.) 41. Tagung Psychologie und Gehirn - Abstracts der Beiträge (2015)

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See detailAffektive Bewertung von Körperbildern bei Anorexia nervosa
Lutz, Annika UL; Herbert, C.; Schulz, André UL et al

in Wittchen, H.-U.; Härtling, S.; Hoyer, J. (Eds.) Abstractband - Wieviel Psychologie steckt in der Psychotherapie? (2015)

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See detailBody or cup? Alterations in featural and configural body image processing in anorexia nervosa
Lutz, Annika UL; Herbert, Cornelia; Schulz, André UL et al

in Psychophysiology (2015), 52(supplement 1), 123

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See detailAltered patterns of heartbeat-evoked potentials in depersonalization/derealization disorder: neurophysiological evidence for impaired cortical representation of bodily signals
Schulz, André UL; Köster, S.; Beutel, M. E. et al

in Psychosomatic Medicine (2015), 77(5), 506-516

OBJECTIVE: Core features of depersonalization-/derealization disorder (DPD) are emotional numbing and feelings of disembodiment. While there are several neurophysiological findings supporting subjective ... [more ▼]

OBJECTIVE: Core features of depersonalization-/derealization disorder (DPD) are emotional numbing and feelings of disembodiment. While there are several neurophysiological findings supporting subjective emotional numbing, the psychobiology of disembodiment remains unclear. METHODS: Heartbeat-evoked potentials (HEPs), which are considered psychophysiological indicators for the cortical representation of afferent signals originating from the cardiovascular system, were assessed in 23 patients with DPD and 24 healthy control individuals during rest and while performing a heartbeat perception task. RESULTS: Absolute HEP amplitudes did not differ between groups. Nevertheless, healthy individuals showed higher HEPs during the heartbeat perception task than during rest, while no such effect was found in DPD patients (p = .031). DPD patients had higher total levels of salivary alpha-amylase than healthy individuals (9626.6±8200.0 vs. 5344.3±3745.8 kUmin/l; p = .029), but there were no group differences in cardiovascular measures (heart rate: 76.2±10.1 vs. 74.3 ±7.5 bpm, p = .60; nLF HRV: .63±.15 vs. .56 ±.15 n.u., p = .099; LF/HF ratio: 249.3±242.7 vs. 164.8 ±108.8, p = .10), salivary cortisol (57.5±46.7 vs. 55.1±43.6 nmolmin/l, p = .86) or cortisone levels (593.2±260.3 vs. 543.8±257.1 nmolmin/l, p = .52). CONCLUSION: These results suggest altered cortical representation of afferent signals originating from the cardiovascular system in DPD patients, which may be associated with higher sympathetic tone. These findings may reflect difficulties of DPD patients to attend to their actual bodily experiences. [less ▲]

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See detailInterozeption bei Depersonalisations-/Derealisationsstörung: veränderte kortikale Repräsentation afferenter Körpersignale bei intakter Repräsentation auf Hirnstammebene
Schulz, André UL; Matthey, J. H.; Köster, S. et al

in Wittchen, H.-U.; Härtling, S.; Hoyer, J. (Eds.) Abstractband - Wieviel Psychologie steckt in der Psychotherapie? (2015)

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See detailShort-term food deprivation increases amplitudes of heartbeat-evoked potentials
Schulz, André UL; Ferreira de Sá, D. S.; Dierolf, Angelika UL et al

in Psychophysiology (2015), 52(5), 695-703

Nutritional state, i.e. fasting or non-fasting, may affect the processing of interoceptive signals, but mechanisms underlying this effect remain unclear. We investigated 16 healthy women on two separate ... [more ▼]

Nutritional state, i.e. fasting or non-fasting, may affect the processing of interoceptive signals, but mechanisms underlying this effect remain unclear. We investigated 16 healthy women on two separate days: when satiated (standardized food intake) and after an 18 h food deprivation period. On both days, heartbeat-evoked potentials (HEPs) and cardiac and ANS activation indices (heart rate, nLF HRV) were assessed. The HEP is an EEG pattern that is considered an index of cortical representation of afferent cardiovascular signals. Average HEP activity (R-wave +455-595 ms) was enhanced during food deprivation compared to normal food intake. Cardiac activation did not differ between nutritional conditions. Our results indicate that short-term food deprivation amplifies an electrophysiological correlate of the cortical representation of visceral-afferent signals originating from the cardiovascular system. This effect could not be attributed to increased cardiac activation, as estimated by heart rate and nLF HRV, after food deprivation. [less ▲]

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See detailPhysical activity and depression predict event-free survival in heart transplant candidates
Spaderna, Heike; Vögele, Claus UL; Barten, Markus J. et al

in Health Psychology (2014), 33(11), 1328-1336

Objective: This study prospectively evaluated the relationship of physical activity (PA), depression and anxiety to event-free survival during waiting-time for heart transplantation in ambulatory patients ... [more ▼]

Objective: This study prospectively evaluated the relationship of physical activity (PA), depression and anxiety to event-free survival during waiting-time for heart transplantation in ambulatory patients enrolled in the “Waiting for a New Heart Study”. Methods: Data from 227 ambulatory patients newly listed for heart transplantation was analyzed. Everyday PA (number of activities, caloric expenditure), depression, and anxiety at time of listing were assessed via questionnaires. Events were defined as death, high-urgency transplantation, delisting due to clinical deterioration, and mechanical circulatory support device implantation (MCSD). Associations of PA scores, depression and anxiety with event-free survival were analyzed using Cox proportional hazards models. Covariates included age, sex, BMI, and objective indicators of disease severity. Results: After a median follow-up of 478 days (6-1849 days), 132 events occurred (46 deaths, 20 MCSDs, 54 high-urgency transplantations, 12 delistings). A higher number of activities was significantly associated with a reduced hazard ratio (HR) to experience an event (HR=.88, 95% CI .81-.96), while depression increased this risk (HR=1.64, 95% CI 1.16-2.32). Both effects remained significant in multivariate analyses (HR=.91, 95% CI .83-.99; HR=1.60, 95% CI 1.12-2.29, p-values<.02). No significant interactions between PA scores and emotions were observed and anxiety was unrelated to survival. Conclusion: Both everyday physical activity and the absence of depression prolonged event-free survival in ambulatory heart transplant candidates. These findings were independent of objective measures of disease severity. Patients waiting for cardiac transplantation may benefit from interventions focused on increasing their everyday physical activity and reducing depressive symptoms. [less ▲]

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See detailElicitation of Negative Emotions in Adolescents using Video Clips
Ouzzahra, Yacine UL; Vögele, Claus UL

Poster (2014, September 05)

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See detailPerseverative Cognition in Fibromyalgia
Rost, Silke UL; Van Ryckeghem, Dimitri; Sütterlin, Stefan et al

Scientific Conference (2014, September 04)

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See detailDreaming and health (Chapter 37)
Vögele, Claus UL

in Tranquillo, Nicholas (Ed.) Dream consciousness: Allan Hobson's new approach to the brain and its mind (2014)

This book presents three lectures by Allan Hobson, entitled “The William James Lectures on Dream Consciousness”. The three lectures expose the new psychology, the new physiology and the new philosophy ... [more ▼]

This book presents three lectures by Allan Hobson, entitled “The William James Lectures on Dream Consciousness”. The three lectures expose the new psychology, the new physiology and the new philosophy that derive from and support the protoconsciousness hypothesis of dreaming. They review in detail many of the studies on sleep and dreaming conducted since the days of Sigmund Freud. Following the lectures are commentaries written by scholars whose expertise covers a wide range of scientific disciplines including, but not limited to, philosophy, psychology, neurology, neuropsychology, cognitive science, biology, and animal sciences. The commentaries each answer a specific question in relation to Hobson’s lectures and his premise that dreaming is an altered state of consciousness. Capitalizing on a vast amount of data, the lectures and commentaries provide undisputed evidence that sleep consists of a well-organized sequence of subtly orchestrated brain states that undoubtedly play a crucial function in the maintenance of normal brain functions. These functions include both basic homeostatic processes necessary to keep the organism alive as well as the highest cognitive functions including perception, decision making, learning and consciousness. [less ▲]

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