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See detailTransforming the World by Transforming the University: Envisioning the University of 2040
König, Ariane UL; Dyball, Robert; Davila, Federico

in Solutions (2016), 7(3), 12-16

This article is part of a regular section in Solutions in which the author is challenged to envision a future society in which all the right changes have been made.

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See detailLearning through evaluation e A tentative evaluative scheme for sustainability transition experiments
Luederitz, Christopher; Schäpke, Niko; Wiek, Arnim et al

in Journal of Cleaner Production (2016), xxx

Transitions towards sustainability are urgently needed to address the interconnected challenges of economic development, ecological integrity, and social justice, from local to global scales. Around the ... [more ▼]

Transitions towards sustainability are urgently needed to address the interconnected challenges of economic development, ecological integrity, and social justice, from local to global scales. Around the world, collaborative science-society initiatives are forming to conduct experiments in support of sustainability transitions. Such experiments, if carefully designed, provide significant learning opportunities for making progress on transition efforts. Yet, there is no broadly applicable evaluative scheme available to capture this critical information across a large number of cases, and to guide the design of transition experiments. To address this gap, the article develops such a scheme, in a tentative form, drawing on evaluative research and sustainability transitions scholarship, alongside insights from empirical cases. We critically discuss the scheme's key features of being generic, comprehensive, operational, and formative. Furthermore, we invite scholars and practitioners to apply, reflect and further develop the proposed tentative scheme e making evaluation and experiments objects of learning. [less ▲]

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See detailChanging requisites to higher education in the face of 21st century sustainability challenges.
König, Ariane UL

in Current Opinion in Environmental Sustainability (2015), 16

Sustainability science aims to enhance our understanding and increase our repertoire of action on urgent complex problems of how to reconcile our societal metabolism with the biophysical carrying capacity ... [more ▼]

Sustainability science aims to enhance our understanding and increase our repertoire of action on urgent complex problems of how to reconcile our societal metabolism with the biophysical carrying capacity of the earth. Sustainability science thus requires new forms of interaction between the natural and social sciences and between science and society. Universities across the globe are re-thinking their mission accordingly. This paper summarizes changing conceptions of science, knowledge and practice and on this basis it identifies a set of requisites to learning, teaching and research in universities that aim to foster systemic change. This set structures the overview on the fourteen contributions to this special issue on how leading universities across five continents stage transformative learning opportunities. These contributions are developed from a wide range of perspectives from diverse academic disciplines and practice. [less ▲]

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See detailChanging requisites to higher education in the face of 21st century sustainability challenges
König, Ariane UL; Budwig, Nancy

in Current Opinion in Environmental Sustainability (2015), 16

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See detailTowards systemic change: On the co-creation and evaluation of a study programme in transformative sustainability science with stakeholders in Luxembourg
König, Ariane UL

in Current Opinion in Environmental Sustainability (2015), 16

This paper examines a study programme in ‘Sustainability and social innovation’ at the University of Luxembourg that was co-created with key external stakeholders in local sustainability transitions.The ... [more ▼]

This paper examines a study programme in ‘Sustainability and social innovation’ at the University of Luxembourg that was co-created with key external stakeholders in local sustainability transitions.The programme’s aim is to equip scientists and citizens for the practice of transformative sustainability science to change human environment interactions. Addressing socially salient, complex problems invites a re-conception of what role universities can play in knowledge production processes in more applied and local contexts. We critically discuss the programme’s ambition to provide a platform for transformative social learning for sustainability and to contribute to fostering systemic change in Luxembourg. We deduce design requisites to achieve these ambitions. The paper also discusses the role of different forms of evaluation in effecting individual programme and systemic change. Research insights were drawn from documentary and literature research, concept-building, programme implementation, observation, analysis, and evaluation by students and contributors. [less ▲]

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See detailWorkplace Relocation and Mobility Changes in a Transnational Metropolitan Area: The Case of the University of Luxembourg
Sprumont, François UL; Viti, Francesco UL; Caruso, Geoffrey UL et al

in Transportation Research Procedia (2014, December), 4

The aim of this paper is to study the utility variation related to the commuting mobility of University staff members due to their future workplace relocation. During the year 2012, a travel survey was ... [more ▼]

The aim of this paper is to study the utility variation related to the commuting mobility of University staff members due to their future workplace relocation. During the year 2012, a travel survey was completed by a total of 397 staff members, representing 36.4% of the university employees, who filled in a questionnaire which revealed complex decision making patterns due to the special traveling scenario involving four countries at once. A Multinomial Logit model has been used to anticipate the impact of university relocation from the capital city to a developing area in the south of the country which will happen between 2015 and 2018 and that will affect most of the employees. The effects of several Travel Demand Management measures are discussed based on the analysis of alternative scenarios [less ▲]

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See detailRegenerative Sustainable Development of Universities and Cities: The Role of Living Laboratories
König, Ariane UL

Book published by Edward ELGAR: A family business in international publishing - 1st edition (2013)

Now that the earth has reached the limits of its biophysical carrying capacity, we have to change technologies, social practices and social norms relating to material production and consumption to ensure ... [more ▼]

Now that the earth has reached the limits of its biophysical carrying capacity, we have to change technologies, social practices and social norms relating to material production and consumption to ensure that e do not further jeopardize the functioning of our planet's life support systems. Through research, education and civic engagement , universities have a pivotal role to play in this transition. this timely book explores how universities are establishing living laboratories for sustainable development, and examines the communication networks and knowledge infrastructures that underpin impact both on and beyond the campus. [less ▲]

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See detailGreen growth in the Benelux: Indicators of local transition to a low-carbon economy in cross-border regions
Bruyninckx, Hans; Martinez-Fernandez; Sharpe, Samantha et al

Report (2013)

This paper discusses the results of a study of measuring green growth in the Benelux countries (Belgium, The Netherlands and Luxembourg). The study paid particular attention to the challenges of measuring ... [more ▼]

This paper discusses the results of a study of measuring green growth in the Benelux countries (Belgium, The Netherlands and Luxembourg). The study paid particular attention to the challenges of measuring the transition to a low-carbon economy in cross-border areas as they have additional levels of complexity when it comes to measuring and monitoring their low-carbon transition. In cross- regions data collection hardly ever coincide with any single data gathering ‘institution’. Moreover, Belgium (Flanders, Brussels, Wallonia), the Netherlands, and Luxembourg have different indicator systems at the national level, and even more so at the more decentralised level which creates problems of data availability, data (in)consistency, and hence comparability. Progress is already noticeable in the two crossborder areas analysed in the study. In Ghent-Terneuzen the bio-base economy is contributing to the value of turnover and growth in employment in the environmental goods and services (EGS) sectors. In Alzette-Belval the construction industry is engaging in resource-efficient building design and certification. In other aspects there is evidence of progress, but this evidence is anecdotal, or patchy in its collection, and not able to be included in the dashboard metrics developed during the study and discussed in the paper. [less ▲]

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See detailIntroduction: Experimenting for sustainable development? Living laboratories, social learning and the role of the university
König, Ariane UL

in König, Ariane (Ed.) Regenerative Sustainable Development of Universities and Cities (2013)

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See detailConclusion: a cross-cultural exploration of the co-creation of knowledge in living laboratories for societal transformation across four continents
König, Ariane UL

in König, Ariane (Ed.) Regenerative Sustainable Development of Universities and Cities (2013)

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See detailWhat might a sustainable university look like? Challenges and opportunities in the development of the University of Luxembourg and its new campus
König, Ariane UL

in König, Ariane (Ed.) Regenerative Sustainable Development of Universities and Cities (2013)

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See detailCompatibility of the SAFE FOODS Risk Analysis Framework with the legal and institutional settings of the EU and the WTO
König, Ariane UL

in Food Control (2010), 21(12), 1638-1652

This paper analyses the compatibility of the SAFE FOODS recommendations with the food safety governance systems of the EU and the World Trade Organisation (WTO), in which standard setting procedures of ... [more ▼]

This paper analyses the compatibility of the SAFE FOODS recommendations with the food safety governance systems of the EU and the World Trade Organisation (WTO), in which standard setting procedures of the Codex Alimentarius Commission (CAC) are considered most relevant. The objective is to better understand the implications from (1) the addition of formalised framing and evaluation stages to the risk analysis process and (2) the expansion of the scope of the risk assessment to comprise the distribution of risks, benefits and costs of regulatory measures. The paper concludes that these recommendations of the SAFE FOODS project are compatible to EU law provided they are fine-tuned to legal provisions on specific roles for agencies, EU Member States and the European Commission services. All recommendations are deemed largely compatible with the rules for procedure of the CAC. [less ▲]

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See detailEnvironmental risk assessment for food-related substances
Smith, M. R.; König, Ariane UL

in Food Control (2010), 21(12), 1588-1600

This report analyses various environmental risk assessment practices that are currently in place for food-related substances in both the EU and the USA. Within the EU, REACH requires the systematic review ... [more ▼]

This report analyses various environmental risk assessment practices that are currently in place for food-related substances in both the EU and the USA. Within the EU, REACH requires the systematic review of the toxicity of chemicals, with varying degrees of extensiveness of testing required based on the quantities of the chemicals used in practice. Genetically modified organisms are another example of how the environmental impacts of food-producing crops are assessed. The requirements for the use of substances in organic agriculture imply that these should also be assessed for environmental impact. In the USA, the FDA requires environmental assessments for food substance requiring this agency’s action. The EPA has elaborated guidelines for ecological risk assessment that show parallels with the food safety assessment, including the stages of problem formulation, analysis (assessment), and risk characterisation. Also the stakeholder involvement and risk management play an important role in the procedures envisaged by these guidelines. The utility of integrated assessments has been further stressed by WHO/IPCS. It is considered that the new integrated risk-analysis approach recommended by SAFE FOODS can benefit from the integration of environmental issues, including their assessment in the risk–benefit stage of the risk analysis cycle. [less ▲]

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See detailEconomic assessment of food safety standards: Costs and benefits of alternative approaches
Traill, W. B.; König, Ariane UL

in Food Control (2010), 21(12), 1611-1619

This article provides an overview of economic methods to measure costs and benefits related to food safety issues. After an introduction on general economic principles, including the distinction between ... [more ▼]

This article provides an overview of economic methods to measure costs and benefits related to food safety issues. After an introduction on general economic principles, including the distinction between social and private costs and benefits, the article highlights the various methods for calculation of costs and benefits, including "willingness to pay", amongst others. Particular attention is paid to the "quality-adjusted life years" (QALY) method for quantitatively expressing health impacts. The practice of Regulatory Impact Assessments as carried out by the UK authorities is explored in more detail as an example of cost-benefit analysis of regulatory measures. The applicability of the approaches to the various stages of the SAFE FOODS model is highlighted. © 2009 Elsevier Ltd. [less ▲]

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See detailThe SAFE FOODS framework for improved risk analysis of foods.
König, Ariane UL; Kuiper, H. A.; Marvin, H. J. P. et al

in Food Control (2010), 21(12), 1566-1587

The SAFEFOODS framework proposes an integrated five-step procedure for the risk analysis. The five steps are: framing, risk assessment, evaluation, risk management, and review. The framework is designed ... [more ▼]

The SAFEFOODS framework proposes an integrated five-step procedure for the risk analysis. The five steps are: framing, risk assessment, evaluation, risk management, and review. The framework is designed to address both risks and benefits. The SAFEFOODS approach introduces a 20-member Interface Committee, headed by a risk manager, to run the procedure. First third of the members is risk managers, second third is independent scientific experts and the last third is stakeholders with economic interests and with consumer interests. The role of the different steps in the procedure and the role of each category of Committee Members during the process are described. The proposal suggests a strict separation of responsibilities between managerial members on one side and scientific members and stakeholder members on the other side. This division of responsibilities in the committee opens up new possibilities for transparency, openness and participation without violation of the delegation-of-power rule. For the communication with the interested parties and the public at large during the process it is foreseen to create an Internet Forum, and use press conferences, press releases and interviews. Overall the SAFEFOODS proposal shall be seen as an invitation for rethinking the current risk assessment/risk management system in EU. [less ▲]

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See detailThe views of key stakeholders on an evolving food risk governance framework: Results from a Delphi study
Wentholt, M.T.A.; Rowe, G.; König, Ariane UL et al

in Food Policy (2009), 34(6), 539-548

Evidence of a decline in public trust associated with food risk governance over recent years has called into question the appropriateness of the current dominant risk analysis framework. Within the EU ... [more ▼]

Evidence of a decline in public trust associated with food risk governance over recent years has called into question the appropriateness of the current dominant risk analysis framework. Within the EU-funded SAFE FOODS project a novel risk analysis framework has been developed that attempts to address potential shortcomings by increasing stakeholder (including consumer) input, improving transparency, and formally incorporating benefit and non-health aspects into the analysis. To assess the viability of this novel framework, the views of food risk experts from the EU and beyond were sought using a distributed online questionnaire process called Delphi. In this paper the main results of this survey are described, revealing varying levels of support for the key innovations of the novel framework. Implications of our results for the new and old frameworks, for the future of risk analysis, and for the policy community more widely, are discussed. [less ▲]

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See detailDemocratizing Decision-Making on Food-Safety in the E.U.: Closing gaps between principles of governance and practice
König, Ariane UL

in Minerva: A Review of Science, Learning and Policy (2007), 45(3), 275-294

Food safety is a preoccupation of the European Commission, but there are major shortcomings in its governance. Reviewing legislation and practice, this paper explores the background of EU food safety ... [more ▼]

Food safety is a preoccupation of the European Commission, but there are major shortcomings in its governance. Reviewing legislation and practice, this paper explores the background of EU food safety institutions, and develops recommendations to make the EU decision process more transparent, accountable, and democratic. [less ▲]

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See detailTowards safer foods and more democratic decisions: Is this a contradictory goal?
König, Ariane UL

in Oléagineux, Corps Gras, Lipides (2007), 14(2), 92-99

Since the mid-1990s and the BSE crisis food safety policy is a priority of the EU. In practise there are however many hurdles towards implementing principles of improved governance, such as transparency ... [more ▼]

Since the mid-1990s and the BSE crisis food safety policy is a priority of the EU. In practise there are however many hurdles towards implementing principles of improved governance, such as transparency and greater participation, especially at EU-level. This paper presents the work of the SAFE FOODS prospect towards the development an improved framework for risk analysis. The final aim is to develop concrete recommendations on how to facilitate coordination between risk assessors, risk managers and stakeholders across the EU, and to keep methods for risk assessment apace with developments in the life sciences. [less ▲]

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See detailGovernance of Food Safety in the European Union
König, Ariane UL

in Carruth, Reba Anne (Ed.) Global Governance of Food and Agriculture Industries: Transatlantic Regulatory Harmonization and Multilateral Policy Cooperation for Food Safety (2006)

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See detailFish consumption and coronary heart disease: A review of data on the dose-response relationship
König, Ariane UL; Cohen, J. T.; Bouzan, C. et al

in American Journal of Preventive Medicine (2005), 29(4), 335-346

Although a rich source of n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) that may confer multiple health benefits, some fish contain methyl mercury (MeHg), which may harm the developing fetus. U.S. government ... [more ▼]

Although a rich source of n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) that may confer multiple health benefits, some fish contain methyl mercury (MeHg), which may harm the developing fetus. U.S. government recommendations for women of childbearing age are to modify consumption of high-MeHg fish to reduce MeHg exposure, while recommendations encourage fishconsumption among the general population because of the nutritional benefits. The Harvard Center for Risk Analysis convened an expert panel (see acknowledgments) to quantify the net impact of resulting hypothetical changes in fishconsumption across the population. This paper estimates the impact of fishconsumption on coronaryheartdisease (CHD) mortality and nonfatal myocardial infarction (MI). Other papers quantify stroke risk and the impacts of both prenatal MeHg exposure and maternal intake of n-3 PUFAs on cognitive development. This analysis identified articles in a recent qualitative review appropriate for the development of a dose–response relationship. Studies had to satisfy quality criteria, quantify fish intake, and report the precision of the relative risk estimates. Relative risk results were averaged, weighted proportionately by precision. CHD risks associated with MeHg exposure were reviewed qualitatively because the available literature was judged inadequate for quantitative analysis. Eight studies were identified (29 exposure groups). Our analysis estimated that consuming small quantities of fish is associated with a 17% reduction in CHD mortality risk, with each additional serving per week associated with a further reduction in this risk of 3.9%. Small quantities of fishconsumption were associated with risk reductions in nonfatal MI risk by 27%, but additional fishconsumption conferred no incremental benefits. [less ▲]

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