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See detailWie soziale Herkunft, Geschlecht und Migrationshintergrund den Übergang in Hochschule und höhere Berufsbildung prägen: Die Schweiz und Frankreich im Vergleich
Griga, Dorit; Hadjar, Andreas UL

in Kriesi, Irene; Liebig, Brigitte; Horwath, Ilona (Eds.) et al Gender und Migration an Universitäten, Fachhochschulen und in der höheren Berufsbildung (2016)

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See detailGender and Educational Achievement
Hadjar, Andreas UL; Krolak-Schwerdt, Sabine UL; Priem, Karin UL et al

Book published by Routledge (2016)

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See detailGender differences in educational attainment
Hadjar, Andreas UL; Krolak-Schwerdt, Sabine UL; Priem, Karin UL et al

in Hadjar, Andreas; Krolak, Sabine; Priem, Karin (Eds.) et al Gender and Educational Achievement (2016)

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See detailTheorising the impact of education systems on inequalities
Gross, Christiane; Meyer, Heinz-Dieter; Hadjar, Andreas UL

in Hadjar, Andreas; Gross, Christiane (Eds.) Education systems and inequalities. International comparisons (2016)

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See detailSchool Alienation, Patriarchal Gender-Role Orientations and the Lower Educational Success of Boys. A Mixed-method Study
Hadjar, Andreas UL; Backes, Susanne UL; Gysin, Stefanie

in Masculinities and Social Change (2015), 4(1), 85-116

This paper is an empirically backed contribution to the current ‘failing boys’ debate in regard to their lower educational success. The cross-sectional analysis focuses on two possible factors behind the ... [more ▼]

This paper is an empirically backed contribution to the current ‘failing boys’ debate in regard to their lower educational success. The cross-sectional analysis focuses on two possible factors behind the lower educational success of boys in secondary school: school alienation and patriarchal gender-role orientations (as an expression of the ‘hegemonic masculinity’). School deviance on the behavioural level is considered as a main mediator between these factors and educational success. Furthermore, teaching style, peer attitudes and social origin are taken into account as important factors of educational success. Analyses are based on a Swiss mixed-method study (questionnaires among 872 eighth-graders, group discussions, class room observations). Results indicate that the gender gap in educational success is caused partly by boys being more alienated from school and preferring patriarchal gender-role orientations. The impacts of these factors on educational success are mediated by school deviance. An authoritative teaching style can largely reduce school alienation. [less ▲]

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See detailUrsachen und Formen von Bildungsungleichheiten
Hadjar, Andreas UL

in Hofmann, Michèle; Boser, Lukas; Bütikofer, Anna (Eds.) et al Lehrbuch Pädagogik. Eine Einführung in grundlegende Themenfelder (2015)

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See detailDie Legitimation sozialer Ungleichheit – Bildung, Status und die Akzeptanz von Ungleichheit auf Basis des meritokratischen Prinzips
Hadjar, Andreas UL

in Dammayr, Maria; Grass, Doris; Rothmüller, Barbara (Eds.) Legitimität. Gesellschaftliche, politische und wissenschaftliche Bruchlinien der Rechtfertigung (2015)

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See detailUpward social mobility and life satisfaction: the cases of United Kingdom and Switzerland
Samuel, Robin UL; Hadjar, Andreas UL

in Longitudinal and Life Course Studies (2015), 6(3), 13-14

Status is a major determinant of subjective well-being (SWB). This is one of the primary assumptions of social production function theory. In contrast, the dissociative hypothesis holds that upward social ... [more ▼]

Status is a major determinant of subjective well-being (SWB). This is one of the primary assumptions of social production function theory. In contrast, the dissociative hypothesis holds that upward social mobility may be linked to identity problems, cognitive distress, and reduced levels of SWB because of lost ties to one’s class of origin. In our paper, we use panel data from the United Kingdom (British Household Panel Survey) and Switzerland (Swiss Household Panel) to test these hypotheses. These two countries are compared because historically, social inequality and upward mobility have played distinct roles in each country’s popular discourse. We conduct longitudinal multilevel analyses to gauge the effects of intragenerational and intergenerational upward mobility on life satisfaction (as a cognitive component of SWB), controlling for previous levels of life satisfaction, dynamic class membership, and well-researched determinants of SWB such as age and health problems. Our results provide some evidence for effects of social class and social mobility on well-being in the UK sample, however, there are no such effects in the Swiss sample. The UK findings support the idea of dissociative effects, that is, intergenerational upward mobility is negatively associated with SWB. [less ▲]

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See detailDoes upward social mobility increase life satisfaction? A longitudinal analysis using British and Swiss panel data
Hadjar, Andreas UL; Samuel, Robin UL

in Research in Social Stratification and Mobility (2015), 39

A main assumption of social production function theory is that status is a major determinant of subjective well-being (SWB). From the perspective of the dissociative hypothesis, however, upward social ... [more ▼]

A main assumption of social production function theory is that status is a major determinant of subjective well-being (SWB). From the perspective of the dissociative hypothesis, however, upward social mobility may be linked to identity problems, distress, and reduced levels of SWB because upwardly mobile people lose their ties to their class of origin. In this paper, we examine whether or not one of these arguments holds. We employ the United Kingdom and Switzerland as case studies because both are linked to distinct notions regarding social inequality and upward mobility. Longitudinal multilevel analyses based on panel data (UK: BHPS, Switzerland: SHP) allow us to reconstruct individual trajectories of life satisfaction (as a cognitive component of SWB) along with events of intragenerational and intergenerational upward mobility—taking into account previous levels of life satisfaction, dynamic class membership, and well-studied determinants of SWB. Our results show some evidence for effects of social class and social mobility on well-being in the UK sample, while there are no such effects in the Swiss sample. The UK findings support the idea of dissociative effects in terms of a negative effect of intergenerational upward mobility on SWB. [less ▲]

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See detailBildungsungleichheiten im luxemburgischen Bildungssystem
Hadjar, Andreas UL; Fischbach, Antoine UL; Martin, Romain UL et al

in Ministère de l’Éducation nationale, de l’Enfance et de la Jeunesse, SCRIPT & Université du Luxembourg, FLSHASE (Ed.) Bildungsbericht Luxemburg 2015. Band 2: Analysen und Befunde (2015)

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See detailForschungsdesigns und statistische Verfahren
Boehnke, Klaus; Hadjar, Andreas UL

in Hurrelmann, Klaus; Bauer, Ullrich; Grundmann, Matthias (Eds.) et al Handbuch Sozialisationsforschung (2015)

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See detailGender stereotypes and gendered vocational aspirations among Swiss secondary school students
Hadjar, Andreas UL; Aeschlimann, Belinda

in Educational Research (2015), 57(1), 22-42

Background: Horizontal gender inequalities appear to be rather stable, with girls more often choosing ‘female’ service professions, and boys choosing career paths related to science, technology ... [more ▼]

Background: Horizontal gender inequalities appear to be rather stable, with girls more often choosing ‘female’ service professions, and boys choosing career paths related to science, technology, engineering or Mathematics. Purpose: Non-egalitarian patriarchal gender-role orientations and gender associations (perceived femininity) of the school subjects German Language Arts and Mathematics are theorised – triangulating different theoretical backgrounds – and empirically analysed as a major predictor of gender-typical vocational aspirations, considering interest in these school subjects as a mediating factor. Furthermore, we focus on a patriarchal relation of father’s and mother’s workforce participation as a root of gender-role orientations, and teacher gender in regard to its impact on gendered images of subjects. Sample: Empirical analyses are based on survey data from eighth-graders (around the ages of 14 and 15 at the time of data gathering) in the Swiss canton of Bern. The sample only encompasses children from two-parent families, as patriarchality in terms of differences in workforce participation between father and mother is taken into account. Design and methods: The research issues are analysed employing structural equation models. The statistical package Mplus allows for an analysis of the two dependent dichotomous variables ‘gender-typical vocational aspiration’ and ‘gender-atypical vocational aspiration’. The hierarchic structure of the sample (school class clusters) is taken into account. Results: Findings reveal different patterns for boys and girls; for boys, gender-typical (male) vocational aspiration could be explained to a small extent via gender-role orientations, interest in Mathematics and gender associations of school subjects; for girls, the factors under consideration could be empirically linked to ‘atypical vocational aspiration’. Teacher gender only has an impact among girls: if girls are taught by a female Mathematics teacher, they perceive the subject as a bit more female and show a higher interest in this subject. Their likelihood of having a gender-atypical vocational aspiration is a bit higher than among girls with a male Mathematics teacher who perceive the subject as a bit less female and, thus, show somewhat lower interest in this subject. Conclusions: There are still links – although weak – between gender stereotypes and vocational aspirations. Gender-role orientations are rooted in the family. A sensitisation towards gender stereotypes and their impact on aspirations and career would appear to be meaningful in broadening the vocational perspectives of men and women. [less ▲]

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See detail“Individualization” and Class-Structure: How Individual Lives Are Still Affected by Social Inequalities
Becker, Rolf; Hadjar, Andreas UL

in International Social Science Journal (2015), 213/214

Detailed reference viewed: 182 (13 UL)
See detailBenachteiligte Jungen – erfolgreiche Männer? Auf der Suche nach Ursachen für Geschlechterunterschiede im Schulerfolg
Hadjar, Andreas UL

in Jakoby, Nina; Peitz, Martina; Schmid, Tina (Eds.) et al Männer und Männlichkeiten. Disziplinäre Perspektiven (2014)

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See detailMigrant Background and Higher Education Participation in Europe: The Effect of the Educational Systems
Griga, Dorit; Hadjar, Andreas UL

in European Sociological Review (2014), 30(3), 275-286

The main aim of this article is to shed light on the extent to which differences in higher education participation between people with and without a migrant background of low/higher social origin can be ... [more ▼]

The main aim of this article is to shed light on the extent to which differences in higher education participation between people with and without a migrant background of low/higher social origin can be explained by two macro-level characteristics of national educational institutions: stratification of the secondary school system and provision of alternative access to higher education. General assumptions are that people with a migrant background of low social origin benefit in low-stratified secondary school systems and in systems that provide alternative access to institutions of higher education more than their native peers in the same social stratum, owing to primary and secondary effects of migrant background. Database is a pooled dataset of the five waves of the European Social Survey. Results of logistic multi-level analyses indicate that a low-stratified secondary school system improves the probability of people with a migrant background/low social origin attaining a higher education degree. On the other hand, a stratified secondary school system reduces their chances regarding this educational stage. The provision of alternative access to an institution of higher education improves their likelihood of becoming higher education graduates. [less ▲]

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See detailKlassenspezifische Wahlabstinenz – Spielt das Vertrauen in politische Institutionen eine Rolle?
Hadjar, Andreas UL; Köthemann, Dennis

in Kölner Zeitschrift für Soziologie und Sozialpsychologie (2014), 66(1), 51-76

This article aims at an analysis to what extent class-differences in non-voting—more precisely: non-voting intention—can be explained referring to the factors of trust in institutions. What is the link ... [more ▼]

This article aims at an analysis to what extent class-differences in non-voting—more precisely: non-voting intention—can be explained referring to the factors of trust in institutions. What is the link between a lack of trust in state institutions and the intention to abstain from voting? Are there parallel class differences in all of these aspects? Data base is a cumulated ALLBUS data-set (1984, 1994, 2002, 2008). Results indicate class differences in non-voting intention and trust in political institutions—with lowest scores for lowly-skilled working class. Multivariate models show that class-differences in non-voting intention can be explained only to a rather small extent by class-specific trust in institutions. Looking at the time periods, an increasing distance between lowly-skilled working class and the political system can be recognised. [less ▲]

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See detailDie politische Dimension der Bildung. Zu Jutta Allmendinger: „Bildungsarmut: Zur Verschränkung von Bildungs- und Sozialpolitik“
Gross, Christiane; Hadjar, Andreas UL

in Soziale Welt : Zeitschrift für sozialwissenschaftliche Forschung und Praxis (2014), Sonderband 21

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See detailGender and educational achievement
Hadjar, Andreas UL; Krolak-Schwerdt, Sabine UL; Priem, Karin UL et al

in Educational Research (2014), 56(2), 117-125

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See detailSpecial Issue: Gender and educational achievement
Hadjar, Andreas UL; Krolak-Schwerdt, Sabine UL; Priem, Karin UL et al

in Educational Research (2014), 56(2),

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See detailIntergenerationale Werteähnlichkeit, Distanz zu gesellschaftlichen Mainstream-Werten und subjektives Wohlbefinden von MigrantInnen
Hadjar, Andreas UL; Boehnke, Klaus; Knafo, Ariel et al

in Weiss, Hilde; Schnell, Philipp; Gülay, Ates (Eds.) Zwischen den Generationen. Transmissionsprozesse in Familien mit Migrationshintergrund (2014)

Intergenerationale Wertetransmissionsprozesse – und damit auch die Ähnlichkeit zwischen den Werteprioritäten der Eltern und denen der Kinder als Produkt dieser Prozesse – sind essentiell für die ... [more ▼]

Intergenerationale Wertetransmissionsprozesse – und damit auch die Ähnlichkeit zwischen den Werteprioritäten der Eltern und denen der Kinder als Produkt dieser Prozesse – sind essentiell für die Reproduktion der Kultur einer Gesellschaft. Ein wesentliches Motiv, die Werthaltungen der Eltern bzw. der Gesellschaft zu übernehmen, kann aus der rationalen Perspektive der Theorie der sozialen Produktionsfunktionen (Ormel et al. 1999) darin gesehen werden, dass über Verhaltensbestätigung subjektives Wohlbefinden produziert werden kann. Die Dimension der Verhaltensbestätigung wird als „the feeling of doing ‚the right thing‘ in the eyes of relevant others (including yourself)“ (Lindenberg 2002, S. 649) beschrieben, wobei dies auch die Übereinstimmung hinsichtlich verhaltensrelevanter Normen und Werten von Bezugspersonen und –gruppen beinhaltet. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 149 (0 UL)