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See detailWhat makes Data Science different? A discussion involving Statistics2.0 and Computational Sciences
Ley, Christophe; Bordas, Stéphane UL

E-print/Working paper (2017)

Data Science is today one of the main buzzwords be it in business, industrial or academic settings. Machine learning, experimental design, data-driven modelling are all, undoubtedly, rising disciplines if ... [more ▼]

Data Science is today one of the main buzzwords be it in business, industrial or academic settings. Machine learning, experimental design, data-driven modelling are all, undoubtedly, rising disciplines if one goes by the soaring number of research papers and patents appearing each year. The prospect of becoming a ``Data Scientist'' appeals to many. A discussion panel organised as part of the European Data Science Conference (European Association for Data Science (EuADS)) asked the question: ``What makes Data Science different?'' In this paper we give our own, personal and multi-facetted view on this question, from an engineering and a statistics perspective. In particular, we compare Data Science to Statistics and discuss the connection between Data Science and Computational Science. [less ▲]

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See detailA hybrid T-Trefftz polygonal finite element for linear elasticity
Bhattacharjee, Kalyan; Natarajan, Sundararajan; Bordas, Stéphane UL

E-print/Working paper (2014)

In this paper, we construct hybrid T-Trefftz polygonal finite elements. The displacement field within the polygon is repre- sented by the homogeneous solution to the governing differential equation, also ... [more ▼]

In this paper, we construct hybrid T-Trefftz polygonal finite elements. The displacement field within the polygon is repre- sented by the homogeneous solution to the governing differential equation, also called as the T-complete set. On the boundary of the polygon, a conforming displacement field is independently defined to enforce continuity of the displacements across the element boundary. An optimal number of T-complete functions are chosen based on the number of nodes of the polygon and degrees of freedom per node. The stiffness matrix is computed by the hybrid formulation with auxiliary displacement frame. Results from the numerical studies presented for a few benchmark problems in the context of linear elasticity shows that the proposed method yield highly accurate results. [less ▲]

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See detailLinear smoothed polygonal and polyhedral finite elements
Francis, Amrita; Ortiz-Bernardin, Alejandro; Bordas, Stéphane UL et al

E-print/Working paper (n.d.)

It was observed in [1, 2] that the strain smoothing technique over higher order elements and arbitrary polytopes yields less accurate solutions than other techniques such as the conventional polygonal ... [more ▼]

It was observed in [1, 2] that the strain smoothing technique over higher order elements and arbitrary polytopes yields less accurate solutions than other techniques such as the conventional polygonal finite element method. In this work, we propose a linear strain smoothing scheme that improves the accuracy of linear and quadratic approximations over convex polytopes. The main idea is to subdivide the polytope into simplicial subcells and use a linear smoothing function in each subcell to compute the strain. This new strain is then used in the computation of the stiffness matrix. The convergence properties and accuracy of the proposed scheme are discussed by solving few benchmark problems. Numerical results show that the proposed linear strain smoothing scheme makes the approximation based on polytopes to deliver improved accuracy and pass the patch test to machine precision. [less ▲]

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See detailLinear smoothed extended finite element method
Murugesan; Natarajan, Sundararajan; Gadyam, Palani et al

E-print/Working paper (n.d.)

The extended finite element method (XFEM) was introduced in 1999 to treat problems involving discontinuities with no or minimal remeshing through appropriate enrichment functions. This enables elements to ... [more ▼]

The extended finite element method (XFEM) was introduced in 1999 to treat problems involving discontinuities with no or minimal remeshing through appropriate enrichment functions. This enables elements to be split by a discontinuity, strong or weak and hence requires the integration of discontinuous functions or functions with discontinuous derivatives over elementary volumes. Moreover, in the case of open surfaces and singularities, special, usually non-polynomial functions must also be integrated.A variety of approaches have been proposed to facilitate these special types of numerical integration, which have been shown to have a large impact on the accuracy and convergence of the numerical solution. The smoothed extended finite element method (SmXFEM) [1], for example, makes numerical integration elegant and simple by transforming volume integrals into surface integrals. However, it was reported in [1, 2] that the strain smoothing is inaccurate when non-polynomial functions are in the basis. This is due to the constant smoothing function used over the smoothing domains which destroys the effect of the singularity. In this paper, we investigate the benefits of a recently developed Linear smoothing procedure [3] which provides better approximation to higher order polynomial fields in the basis. Some benchmark problems in the context of linear elastic fracture mechanics (LEFM) are solved to compare the standard XFEM, the constant-smoothed XFEM (Sm-XFEM) and the linear-smoothed XFEM (LSm-XFEM). We observe that the convergence rates of all three methods are the same. The stress intensity factors (SIFs) computed through the proposed LSm-XFEM are however more accurate than that obtained through Sm-XFEM. To conclude, compared to the conventional XFEM, the same order of accuracy is achieved at a relatively low computational effort. [less ▲]

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