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See detailARL – Akademie für RaumePostwachstum und Raumentwicklung – Denkanstöße für Wissenschaft und Praxis.
Best, Benjamin; Brückner, Heike; Hülz, Martina et al

Report (2021)

This position paper, drawn up by members of the ARL’s Working Group on Post-Growth Economies (2016 – 2020), situates the international post-growth debate and discusses its relevance for spatial ... [more ▼]

This position paper, drawn up by members of the ARL’s Working Group on Post-Growth Economies (2016 – 2020), situates the international post-growth debate and discusses its relevance for spatial development and spatial science research. In addition to sectoral approaches and findings, the authors make concrete proposals for post-growth focuses in planning, research and teaching, distinguishing between changes that can be achieved in the short term and measures designed for the medium to long term. [less ▲]

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See detailData science meets computational mechanics
Dehghani, Hamidreza UL; Zilian, Andreas UL

Report (2021)

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See detailMaaS4All Project Report
Bandiera, Claudia UL; Cisterna, Carolina UL; Viti, Francesco UL

Report (2021)

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See detailData Centric Engineering and Data-Driven Modelling - Computational Engineering Lab Report 2019
Bordas, Stéphane UL; Peters, Bernhard UL; Viti, Francesco UL et al

Report (2019)

https://www.cambridge.org/core/journals/data-centric-engineering

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See detailComputational Sciences Year 2016 Activity Report
Bordas, Stéphane UL

Report (2016)

Born from a bottom-up initiative of Mathematics, Computer Science, Physics and Computational Engineering, Computational Sciences (CoSc) have contributed to create at UL a positive and symbiotic research ... [more ▼]

Born from a bottom-up initiative of Mathematics, Computer Science, Physics and Computational Engineering, Computational Sciences (CoSc) have contributed to create at UL a positive and symbiotic research environment relying on a strong fundamental scientific research core. CoSc will continue to rationalize research efforts across a range of strategic innovation domains by centralizing research and development tools and building upon the existing strengths of the Luxembourgish research and socio-economic landscape. [less ▲]

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See detailShape Optimization Directly from CAD: an Isogeometric Boundary Element Approach Using T-splines
Lian, Haojie; Pierre, Kerfriden; Bordas, Stéphane UL

Report (2016)

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See detail2015 Lab report - Legato report 001
Bordas, Stéphane UL

Report (2016)

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See detailComputational Mechanics Lab Report 2013-2014
Bordas, Stéphane UL

Report (2015)

This is the report of the Computational Mechanics Lab led by Prof. Stéphane Bordas

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See detailExtension of 2D FEniCS implementation of Cosserat non-local elasticity to the 3D case
Sautot, Camille; Bordas, Stéphane UL; Hale, Jack UL

Report (2014)

The objective of the study is the extension of the existing 2D FEniCS implementation of Cosserat elasticity to the 3D case. The first step is the implementation of a patch-test for a simple problem in ... [more ▼]

The objective of the study is the extension of the existing 2D FEniCS implementation of Cosserat elasticity to the 3D case. The first step is the implementation of a patch-test for a simple problem in classical elasticity as a Timoshenko's beam - this study will show that DOLFIN could offer approximated solutions converging to the analytical solution. The second step is the computation of the stress in a plate with a circular hole. The stress concentration factors around the hole in classical and Cosserat elasticities will be compared, and a convergence study for the Cosserat case will be realised. The third step is the extension to the 3D case with the computation of the stress concentration factor around a spherical cavity in an infinite elastic medium. This computed value will be compare to the analytical solution described by couple-stress theory. [less ▲]

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See detailGlobal energy minimization for multiple fracture growth
Sutula, Danas; Bordas, Stéphane UL

Report (2013)

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See detailSpace-time goal-oriented reduced basis approximation for linear wave equation
Hoang, Khac Chi; Kerfriden, Pierre; Bordas, Stéphane UL

Report (2013)

In this paper, we study numerically the linear damped second-order hyperbolic partial differen-tial equation (PDE) with affine parameter dependence using a goal-oriented approach by finite element (FE ... [more ▼]

In this paper, we study numerically the linear damped second-order hyperbolic partial differen-tial equation (PDE) with affine parameter dependence using a goal-oriented approach by finite element (FE) and reduced basis (RB) methods. The main contribution of this paper is the “goal-oriented” proper orthogonal decomposition (POD)–Greedy sampling procedure within the RB approximation context. First, we introduce the RB recipe: Galerkin projection onto a space YN spanned by solutions of the governing PDE at N selected points in parameter space. This set of N parameter points is constructed by the standard POD–Greedy sampling procedure already developed. Second, based on the affine parameter dependence, we make use of the offline-online computational procedures: in the offline stage, we generate the RB space; in the online stage, given a new parameter value, we calculate rapidly and accurately the space-time RB output of interest and its associated asymptotic error. The proposed goal-oriented POD–Greedy sampling procedure can now be implemented and will look for the parameter points such that it minimizes this (asymptotic) output error rather than the solution error (or, error indicator which is the dual norm of residual) as in the standard POD–Greedy procedure. Numerical results show that the new goal-oriented POD–Greedy sampling procedure improves significantly the accuracy of the space-time output computation in comparison with the standard POD–Greedy one. The method is thus ideally suited for repeated, rapid and reliable evaluation of input-output relationships within the space-time setting. [less ▲]

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See detailtrend Analysis and interpretation of Luxembourg’s consumption Footprint NFA 2010 edition, data years 2000 – 2007
Hild, Paula UL; Takagi, Aya; Schmitt, Bianca

Report (2012)

The Ecological Footprint methodology by Global Footprint Network measures human consumption of products and services from different ecosystems in terms of the amount of bioproductive land and sea area ... [more ▼]

The Ecological Footprint methodology by Global Footprint Network measures human consumption of products and services from different ecosystems in terms of the amount of bioproductive land and sea area needed to supply these products and services. In other words, the Ecological Footprint calculates the land area needed to produce food, provide resources, produce energy, and absorb the CO2 emissions generated by the supply chains within one year at country level. For the calculations of Luxembourg’s Ecological Footprint, international statistical databases are used to identify the quantities of produced, imported and exported goods and services. Then, Global Footprint Network applies different factors to the quantities to assess the area needed to supply these products and services. Finally, the Consumption Footprint of a nation is divided by the number of inhabitants and compared to other countries at a per capita level (global hectares per capita). This means that the Ecological Footprint can be used as an indicator for the sustainability of a national consumption by assessing human land uses. In the following paragraph, Luxembourg’s Ecological Footprint is discussed in the framework of the environmental indicators of Luxembourg’s competitiveness scoreboard (see Table 9) [MECE, 2010]. Luxembourg’s ranking is rather low for all of the scoreboard indicators: number of ISO 9001 certifications per billion of inhabitants (21 out of 27); number of ISO 14001 certifications per billion of inhabitants (15 out of 27); total greenhouse gas emissions (15 out of 27); renewable energy ration (23 out of 27); quantity of municipal waste per capita per year (24 out of 27); energetic intensity (8 out of 27); transport by car (17 out of 27); Ecological Footprint in gha per capita per year (27 out of 27). Based on the environmental competiveness scoreboard indicators, it can be concluded that in general, Luxembourg’s environmental performance is low compared to the other countries of the European Union. With respect to Luxembourg’s Ecological Footprint, it can be said that Luxembourg’s consumption is not sustainable. The number of planets that would be needed if the world's population lived like the population of Luxembourg in 2007 is about six. However, per year, the biocapacity (bioproductive land) of the planet can only regenerate once. [less ▲]

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See detailGeneric Local Computation
Pouly, Marc UL; Schneuwly, Cesar; Kohlas, Jürg

Report (2011)

Many problems of artificial intelligence, or more generally, many problems of information processing, have a generic solution based on local computation on join trees or acyclic hypertrees. There are ... [more ▼]

Many problems of artificial intelligence, or more generally, many problems of information processing, have a generic solution based on local computation on join trees or acyclic hypertrees. There are several variants of this method all based on the algebraic structure of a valuation algebra. A strong requirement underlying this approach is that the elements of a problem decomposition form a join tree. Although it is always possible to construct covering join trees, if the requirement is originally not satisfied, it is not always possible or not efficient to extend the elements of the decomposition to the covering join tree. Therefore in this paper different variants of an axiomatic framework of valuation algebras are introduced which prove sufficient for local computation without the need of an extension of the factors of a decomposition. This framework covers the axiomatic system proposed by (Shenoy & Shafer, 1990). A particular emphasis is laid on the important special cases of idempotent algebras and algebras with some notion of division. It is shown that all well-known architectures for local computation like the Shenoy-Shafer architecture, Lauritzen-Spiegelhalter and HUGIN architectures may be adapted to this new framework. Further a new architecture for idempotent algebras is presented. As examples, in addition to the classical instances of valuation algebras, semiring induced valuation algebras, Gaussian potentials and the relational algebra are presented. [less ▲]

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See detailProcess Reference Model "IT Grundschutz"
Asselborn, Jean-Claude; Dagorn, Nathalie; Niederkorn, Philippe et al

Report (2006)

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See detailProcess Reference Model "Mehari"
Asselborn, Jean-Claude; Dagorn, Nathalie; Niederkorn, Philippe et al

Report (2006)

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See detailLes modes opéatoires de la cryptographie symétrique
Schiltz, Jang UL

Report (2003)

Detailed reference viewed: 55 (0 UL)