References of "Vos, Steven"
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See detailOffice Agents: Personal Office Vitality Sensors with Intent
Stamhuis, Sjoerd; Brombacher, Hans; Vos, Steven et al

Scientific Conference (2021, May)

In smart office buildings, almost every aspect of the environment can be assessed and adjusted by sensors. Yet employees rarely have access to the data collected to act upon it. It is also unclear what ... [more ▼]

In smart office buildings, almost every aspect of the environment can be assessed and adjusted by sensors. Yet employees rarely have access to the data collected to act upon it. It is also unclear what they would find meaningful to follow the recommendations on healthy work conditions and behavior, while productivity is the priority. The Office Agents are a set of artefacts placed on the employee’s desk, which capture data about the office environment. Air quality, sound level, light exposure, productivity, and physical activity level are measured to provide office workers with feedback on the ‘best’ working conditions. Using speculative design and Objects with Intent, the employee engages in a negotiation with the Office Agents based on the office ecosystem. Through this project and interactivity session, we open a debate on the use of sensors in office environments and the stakes around office vitality from the viewpoint of the employees. [less ▲]

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See detailWhich App to Choose? An Online Tool that Supports the Decision-making Process of Recreational Runners to Choose an App
Janssen, Mark; Lallemand, Carine UL; Hoes, Kevin et al

in Proceedings of the 6th International Conference on Design4Health Amsterdam 2020 (2020)

In recent years, there has been an exponential increase in the use of health and sports-related smartphone applications (apps). This is also reflected in App-stores, which are stacked with thousands of ... [more ▼]

In recent years, there has been an exponential increase in the use of health and sports-related smartphone applications (apps). This is also reflected in App-stores, which are stacked with thousands of health- and sports-apps, with new apps launched each day. These apps have great potential to monitor and support people’s physical activity and health. For users, however, it is difficult to know which app suits their needs. In this paper, we present an online tool that supports the decision-making process for choosing an appropriate app. We constructed and validated a screening instrument to assess app content quality, together with the assessment of users’ needs. Both served as input for building the tool through various iterations with prototypes and user tests. This resulted in an online tool which relies on app content quality scores to match the users’ needs with apps that score high in the screening instrument on those particular needs. Users can add new apps to the database via the screening instrument, making the tool self supportive and future proof. A feedback loop allows users to give feedback on the recommended app and how well it meets their needs. This feedback is added to the database and used in future filtering and recommendations. The principles used can be applied to other areas of sports, physical activity and health to help users to select an app that suits their needs. Potentially increasing the long-term use of apps to monitor and to support physical activity and health. [less ▲]

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See detailVisualizing Computer-Based Activity on Ambient Displays to Reduce Sedentary Behavior at Work
Brombacher, Hans; Ren, Xipei; Vos, Steven et al

in 32ND AUSTRALIAN CONFERENCE ON HUMAN-COMPUTER INTERACTION (2020)

Workplace health interventions have predominantly been designed around visualizations of physical activity data in the work routine. Yet, contextual factors, such as computer-based activity, appears to be ... [more ▼]

Workplace health interventions have predominantly been designed around visualizations of physical activity data in the work routine. Yet, contextual factors, such as computer-based activity, appears to be crucial to support healthier behaviors at work. In this research, we explore the effect of visualizing computer-based activity to prompt physical activity at work, through desktop-based ambient displays. Based on our prototypes Yamin and Apphia, we conducted an exploratory qualitative user study in a lab setting with office workers (N=16). Results showed that visualizing one’s computer-based activity could potentially increase the awareness, self-reflection, and social interactions for individuals to become physically active. With our findings, we discuss design implications for using computer activity data in a physical form as a motivational factor to encourage physically active workstyles. We present directions for future field studies to gain further insights on this topic. [less ▲]

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See detailIvy: Reading a critical design for sedentary behavior in the office context
Damen, Ida; Menheere, Daphne; Lallemand, Carine UL et al

in DIS 2020 Companion - Companion Publication of the 2020 ACM Designing Interactive Systems Conference (2020)

In this paper, we present and discuss Ivy, a critical artifact offering a novel design perspective on interventions that aim to reduce sedentary behavior in office workers. Ivy is an interactive office ... [more ▼]

In this paper, we present and discuss Ivy, a critical artifact offering a novel design perspective on interventions that aim to reduce sedentary behavior in office workers. Ivy is an interactive office chair that represents the amount of sitting time through growing ivy strands. Using the matrix of common argument types by Bardzell et al., we propose a structured "reading" of Ivy, as an example supporting reasoned and accessible conversations about criticality in design. Our reading of Ivy emphasized that its criticality emerges mainly from data physicalization as a new form of interactivity intended to trigger reflectiveness. The insights of this design study contribute towards a critical perspective on designing interventions to reduce sedentary time and spark discussion amongst designers and researchers in the field of Human-Computer Interaction. © 2020 Owner/Author. [less ▲]

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See detailIvy: A qualitative interface to reduce sedentary behavior in the office context
Menheere, Daphne; Damen, Ida; Lallemand, Carine UL et al

in DIS 2020 Companion - Companion Publication of the 2020 ACM Designing Interactive Systems Conference (2020)

This paper describes Ivy, an office chair that represents sitting time of an office worker through growing ivy strands. The longer one sits, the more strands will grow onto the chair. By means of a ... [more ▼]

This paper describes Ivy, an office chair that represents sitting time of an office worker through growing ivy strands. The longer one sits, the more strands will grow onto the chair. By means of a qualitative interface called Ivy, we illustrate a design approach that is currently underrepresented in sedentary behavior interventions. With this approach, we counter the current trend of digitalization and quantification of health interventions. Instead of graphs and numbers, Ivy uses data physicalization as a qualitative interface that represents sitting. We describe the design, the process, and future research steps of Ivy as a critical perspective on sedentary behavior interventions. We aim to spark discussion amongst designers and researchers in the field of Human-Computer Interaction to use qualitative interfaces as a promising approach to deepen the user's relationship with the targeted behavior and enrich the ability to construct meaning from the feedback. © 2020 Owner/Author. [less ▲]

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See detailThe hub: Facilitating walking meetings through a network of interactive devices
Damen, Ida; Kok, Anika; Vink, Bas et al

in DIS 2020 Companion - Companion Publication of the 2020 ACM Designing Interactive Systems Conference (2020)

Walking meetings are a promising means to improve healthy behavior at work. By providing a physically active way of working, walking meetings can reduce our sitting time. Several obstacles that limit the ... [more ▼]

Walking meetings are a promising means to improve healthy behavior at work. By providing a physically active way of working, walking meetings can reduce our sitting time. Several obstacles that limit the social acceptance and wider adoption of walking meeting practice have been highlighted in previous research. Amongst these, the difficulty to take notes or present files is a recurring concern for office workers. To address these barriers, we designed the Hub, a network of stand-up meeting stations that accommodate different work-related tasks during walking meetings. We report on two pilot user tests investigating users' experiences and ideas for improvement, and present future research steps. We discuss the usefulness and relevance of the Hub concept to overcome the obstacles associated with walking meetings. © 2020 Owner/Author. [less ▲]

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