References of "Lallemand, Carine 50009322"
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See detailOffice Agents: Personal Office Vitality Sensors with Intent
Stamhuis, Sjoerd; Brombacher, Hans; Vos, Steven et al

Scientific Conference (2021, May)

In smart office buildings, almost every aspect of the environment can be assessed and adjusted by sensors. Yet employees rarely have access to the data collected to act upon it. It is also unclear what ... [more ▼]

In smart office buildings, almost every aspect of the environment can be assessed and adjusted by sensors. Yet employees rarely have access to the data collected to act upon it. It is also unclear what they would find meaningful to follow the recommendations on healthy work conditions and behavior, while productivity is the priority. The Office Agents are a set of artefacts placed on the employee’s desk, which capture data about the office environment. Air quality, sound level, light exposure, productivity, and physical activity level are measured to provide office workers with feedback on the ‘best’ working conditions. Using speculative design and Objects with Intent, the employee engages in a negotiation with the Office Agents based on the office ecosystem. Through this project and interactivity session, we open a debate on the use of sensors in office environments and the stakes around office vitality from the viewpoint of the employees. [less ▲]

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See detailThe Framework of Security-Enhancing Friction: How UX Can Help Users Behave More Securely
Distler, Verena UL; Lenzini, Gabriele UL; Lallemand, Carine UL et al

in New Security Paradigms Workshop (2020, October 26)

A growing body of research in the usable privacy and security community addresses the question of how to best influence user behavior to reduce risk-taking.We propose to address this challenge by ... [more ▼]

A growing body of research in the usable privacy and security community addresses the question of how to best influence user behavior to reduce risk-taking.We propose to address this challenge by integrating the concept of user experience (UX) into empirical usable privacy and security studies that attempt to change risktaking behavior. UX enables us to study the complex interplay between user-related, system-related and contextual factors and provides insights into the experiential aspects underlying behavior change, including negative experiences. We first compare and contrast existing security-enhancing interventions (e.g., nudges, warnings, fear appeals) through the lens of friction. We then build on these insights to argue that it can be desirable to design for moments of negative UX in security-critical situations. For this purpose, we introduce the novel concept of security-enhancing friction, friction that effectively reduces the occurrence of risk-taking behavior and ensures that the overall UX (after use) is not compromised. We illustrate how security-enhancing friction provides an actionable way to systematically integrate the concept of UX into empirical usable privacy and security studies for meeting both the objectives of secure behavior and of overall acceptable experience. [less ▲]

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See detailVisualizing Computer-Based Activity on Ambient Displays to Reduce Sedentary Behavior at Work
Brombacher, Hans; Ren, Xipei; Vos, Steven et al

in 32ND AUSTRALIAN CONFERENCE ON HUMAN-COMPUTER INTERACTION (2020)

Workplace health interventions have predominantly been designed around visualizations of physical activity data in the work routine. Yet, contextual factors, such as computer-based activity, appears to be ... [more ▼]

Workplace health interventions have predominantly been designed around visualizations of physical activity data in the work routine. Yet, contextual factors, such as computer-based activity, appears to be crucial to support healthier behaviors at work. In this research, we explore the effect of visualizing computer-based activity to prompt physical activity at work, through desktop-based ambient displays. Based on our prototypes Yamin and Apphia, we conducted an exploratory qualitative user study in a lab setting with office workers (N=16). Results showed that visualizing one’s computer-based activity could potentially increase the awareness, self-reflection, and social interactions for individuals to become physically active. With our findings, we discuss design implications for using computer activity data in a physical form as a motivational factor to encourage physically active workstyles. We present directions for future field studies to gain further insights on this topic. [less ▲]

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See detailIvy: A qualitative interface to reduce sedentary behavior in the office context
Menheere, Daphne; Damen, Ida; Lallemand, Carine UL et al

in DIS 2020 Companion - Companion Publication of the 2020 ACM Designing Interactive Systems Conference (2020)

This paper describes Ivy, an office chair that represents sitting time of an office worker through growing ivy strands. The longer one sits, the more strands will grow onto the chair. By means of a ... [more ▼]

This paper describes Ivy, an office chair that represents sitting time of an office worker through growing ivy strands. The longer one sits, the more strands will grow onto the chair. By means of a qualitative interface called Ivy, we illustrate a design approach that is currently underrepresented in sedentary behavior interventions. With this approach, we counter the current trend of digitalization and quantification of health interventions. Instead of graphs and numbers, Ivy uses data physicalization as a qualitative interface that represents sitting. We describe the design, the process, and future research steps of Ivy as a critical perspective on sedentary behavior interventions. We aim to spark discussion amongst designers and researchers in the field of Human-Computer Interaction to use qualitative interfaces as a promising approach to deepen the user's relationship with the targeted behavior and enrich the ability to construct meaning from the feedback. © 2020 Owner/Author. [less ▲]

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See detailThe hub: Facilitating walking meetings through a network of interactive devices
Damen, Ida; Kok, Anika; Vink, Bas et al

in DIS 2020 Companion - Companion Publication of the 2020 ACM Designing Interactive Systems Conference (2020)

Walking meetings are a promising means to improve healthy behavior at work. By providing a physically active way of working, walking meetings can reduce our sitting time. Several obstacles that limit the ... [more ▼]

Walking meetings are a promising means to improve healthy behavior at work. By providing a physically active way of working, walking meetings can reduce our sitting time. Several obstacles that limit the social acceptance and wider adoption of walking meeting practice have been highlighted in previous research. Amongst these, the difficulty to take notes or present files is a recurring concern for office workers. To address these barriers, we designed the Hub, a network of stand-up meeting stations that accommodate different work-related tasks during walking meetings. We report on two pilot user tests investigating users' experiences and ideas for improvement, and present future research steps. We discuss the usefulness and relevance of the Hub concept to overcome the obstacles associated with walking meetings. © 2020 Owner/Author. [less ▲]

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See detailIvy: Reading a critical design for sedentary behavior in the office context
Damen, Ida; Menheere, Daphne; Lallemand, Carine UL et al

in DIS 2020 Companion - Companion Publication of the 2020 ACM Designing Interactive Systems Conference (2020)

In this paper, we present and discuss Ivy, a critical artifact offering a novel design perspective on interventions that aim to reduce sedentary behavior in office workers. Ivy is an interactive office ... [more ▼]

In this paper, we present and discuss Ivy, a critical artifact offering a novel design perspective on interventions that aim to reduce sedentary behavior in office workers. Ivy is an interactive office chair that represents the amount of sitting time through growing ivy strands. Using the matrix of common argument types by Bardzell et al., we propose a structured "reading" of Ivy, as an example supporting reasoned and accessible conversations about criticality in design. Our reading of Ivy emphasized that its criticality emerges mainly from data physicalization as a new form of interactivity intended to trigger reflectiveness. The insights of this design study contribute towards a critical perspective on designing interventions to reduce sedentary time and spark discussion amongst designers and researchers in the field of Human-Computer Interaction. © 2020 Owner/Author. [less ▲]

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See detailWhich App to Choose? An Online Tool that Supports the Decision-making Process of Recreational Runners to Choose an App
Janssen, Mark; Lallemand, Carine UL; Hoes, Kevin et al

in Proceedings of the 6th International Conference on Design4Health Amsterdam 2020 (2020)

In recent years, there has been an exponential increase in the use of health and sports-related smartphone applications (apps). This is also reflected in App-stores, which are stacked with thousands of ... [more ▼]

In recent years, there has been an exponential increase in the use of health and sports-related smartphone applications (apps). This is also reflected in App-stores, which are stacked with thousands of health- and sports-apps, with new apps launched each day. These apps have great potential to monitor and support people’s physical activity and health. For users, however, it is difficult to know which app suits their needs. In this paper, we present an online tool that supports the decision-making process for choosing an appropriate app. We constructed and validated a screening instrument to assess app content quality, together with the assessment of users’ needs. Both served as input for building the tool through various iterations with prototypes and user tests. This resulted in an online tool which relies on app content quality scores to match the users’ needs with apps that score high in the screening instrument on those particular needs. Users can add new apps to the database via the screening instrument, making the tool self supportive and future proof. A feedback loop allows users to give feedback on the recommended app and how well it meets their needs. This feedback is added to the database and used in future filtering and recommendations. The principles used can be applied to other areas of sports, physical activity and health to help users to select an app that suits their needs. Potentially increasing the long-term use of apps to monitor and to support physical activity and health. [less ▲]

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See detailEventually everything connects
Lallemand, Carine UL

Speeches/Talks (2018)

If you are reading these lines, you are probably curious about the type of experience that you would have as an attendee of this talk. You might wonder whether the topic would match your interests ... [more ▼]

If you are reading these lines, you are probably curious about the type of experience that you would have as an attendee of this talk. You might wonder whether the topic would match your interests, whether the speaker will be good enough to satisfy your expectations, whether you will feel inspired, exhilarated, or whether you will have concrete tools to bring back to your work. While you are usually the ones shaping people’s experiences, you are striving for nice experiences as well. Designing for human experiences is one of the most challenging yet fascinating activities. It is a responsibility that we should embrace with humility and dedication. To face the complexity of our mission, we need to draw on theoretical knowledge, methodological skills and of course on our shared professional expertise, as a community. While UX practitioners are working hard at the front lines to design better products or services, scientists work in the shadows to develop and consolidate a myriad of novel and highly valuable UX methods. During this talk, you will discover the ever-growing UX toolbox that could greatly support you in collecting richer, insightful and more valid data. From scientific theories to pragmatic methods, from academia to industry, from Luxembourg to Puerto Rico… Eventually everything connects. [less ▲]

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See detailAcceptability and Acceptance of Autonomous Mobility on Demand: The Impact of an Immersive Experience
Distler, Verena UL; Lallemand, Carine UL; Thierry, Bellet

in Proceedings of the 2018 CHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems (2018, April)

Autonomous vehicles have the potential to fundamentally change existing transportation systems. Beyond legal concerns, these societal evolutions will critically depend on user acceptance. As an emerging ... [more ▼]

Autonomous vehicles have the potential to fundamentally change existing transportation systems. Beyond legal concerns, these societal evolutions will critically depend on user acceptance. As an emerging mode of public transportation [7], Autonomous mobility on demand (AMoD) is of particular interest in this context. The aim of the present study is to identify the main components of acceptability (before first use) and acceptance (after first use) of AMoD, following a user experience (UX) framework. To address this goal, we conducted three workshops (N=14) involving open discussions and a ride in an experimental autonomous shuttle. Using a mixed-methods approach, we measured pre-immersion acceptability before immersing the participants in an on-demand transport scenario, and eventually measured post-immersion acceptance of AMoD. Results show that participants were reassured about safety concerns, however they perceived the AMoD experience as ineffective. Our findings highlight key factors to be taken into account when designing AMoD experiences. [less ▲]

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See detailA UX Approach to Privacy and Security: the Impact of User, Contextual and System-Related Factors
Distler, Verena UL; Lallemand, Carine UL; Koenig, Vincent UL

in CHI Workshop Exploring Individual Diffferences in Privacy (2018, April)

This position paper lays out current and future studies which we conduct on the UX aspects of security and privacy, our goal being to understand which factors influence privacy-related decision-making. We ... [more ▼]

This position paper lays out current and future studies which we conduct on the UX aspects of security and privacy, our goal being to understand which factors influence privacy-related decision-making. We advocate using UX design methods in order to study interindividual differences, system-related and contextual factors involved in privacy and security attitudes and behaviors. These results will contribute to user-tailored and personalized privacy initiatives and guide the design of future technologies. [less ▲]

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See detailA UX Approach to Privacy and Security: the Impact of User, Contextual and System-Related Factors
Distler, Verena UL; Lallemand, Carine UL; Koenig, Vincent UL

in CHI Workshop Exploring Individual Diffferences in Privacy (2018, April)

This position paper lays out current and future studies which we conduct on the UX aspects of security and privacy, our goal being to understand which factors influence privacy-related decision-making. We ... [more ▼]

This position paper lays out current and future studies which we conduct on the UX aspects of security and privacy, our goal being to understand which factors influence privacy-related decision-making. We advocate using UX design methods in order to study interindividual differences, system-related and contextual factors involved in privacy and security attitudes and behaviors. These results will contribute to user-tailored and personalized privacy initiatives and guide the design of future technologies. [less ▲]

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See detailLab Testing Beyond Usability: Challenges and Recommendations for Assessing User Experiences
Lallemand, Carine UL; Koenig, Vincent UL

in Journal of Usability Studies (2017), 12(3), 133-154

In the “third wave” of human-computer interaction (HCI), the advent of the conceptual approach of UX broadens and changes the HCI landscape. Methods approved before, mainly within the conceptual approach ... [more ▼]

In the “third wave” of human-computer interaction (HCI), the advent of the conceptual approach of UX broadens and changes the HCI landscape. Methods approved before, mainly within the conceptual approach of usability, are still widely used, and yet their adequacy for UX evaluation remains uncertain in many applications. Laboratory testing is undoubtedly the most prominent example of such a method. Hence, in this study, we investigated how the more comprehensive and emotional scope of UX can be assessed by laboratory testing. In this paper, we report on a use case study involving 70 participants. They first took part in user/laboratory tests and then were asked to evaluate their experience with the two systems (perceived UX) by filling out an AttrakDiff scale and a UX needs fulfillment questionnaire. We conducted post-test interviews to better understand participants’ experiences. We analyzed how the participants’ perceived UX depends on quantitative (e.g., task completion time, task sequence, level of familiarity with the system) and qualitative aspects (think aloud, debriefing interviews) within the laboratory context. Results indicate that the laboratory setting has a strong impact on the participants’ perceived UX, and support a discussion of the quality and limitations of laboratory evaluations regarding UX assessment. In this paper, we have identified concrete challenges and have provided solutions and tips useful for both practitioners and researchers who seek to account for the subjective, situated, and temporal nature of the UX in their assessments. [less ▲]

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See detailTowards consolidated methods for the design and evaluation of user experience
Lallemand, Carine UL

Doctoral thesis (2015)

In the “third wave” of Human-Computer Interaction (HCI), the emergence of User Experience (UX) as a key concept has opened up both exciting perspectives and hard challenges. The conceptual shift to a more ... [more ▼]

In the “third wave” of Human-Computer Interaction (HCI), the emergence of User Experience (UX) as a key concept has opened up both exciting perspectives and hard challenges. The conceptual shift to a more comprehensive and emotional view of human-computer interactions has been accompanied by the development of numerous methods and tools for the design and evaluation of interactive systems. UX research has thus been mainly driven by novelty and innovation and to date a majority of the developed tools lack validation and consolidation. UX research undoubtedly raises new concerns and challenges common conceptual and methodological practice. Thus the primary objective of this thesis is to contribute to UX consolidation. We addressed this objective by relying on a mixed-methods approach for the empirical part of this thesis, involving comparatively large and representative samples. This part encompasses six studies, representing a variety of perspectives related to UX research consolidation. More specifically, this dissertation includes a replication study (Paper A, N = 758), the translation and validation of a tool (Paper B, N = 381), the development of new design and evaluation methods (Paper C and D, N = 137 and 33), the empirical assessment of the relevance of established HCI methods for the evaluation of UX (Paper E, N = 103) and finally an investigation on how to bridge UX research and practice through a design approach (Paper F). The contributions of this thesis to UX research and practice regard both UX as a concept and its methodologies. Main findings inform about the benefits, challenges, and limitations of UX consolidation strategies as derived from our respective studies (papers A to F). Each study provides advances to both research and practice, while the combination of our studies pushes forward consolidation of UX. This is an essential step with regards to an emerging concept and informs an overarching research agenda aiming at a continuous interdisciplinary fostering of the UX field. [less ▲]

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