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See detailSelbststeuerung und der Erwerb individualtaktischer Kompetenz: Eine Grundlagenstudie
Bund, Andreas UL; Memmert, Daniel

Poster (2008, May)

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See detailBrave new word: Multilingualism and language learning. A study of Portuguese immigrant children growing up in a plurilingual society
Engel de Abreu, Pascale UL; Gathercole, S; Martin, Romain UL et al

Poster (2008, April)

Working memory, the capacity to store and manipulate information over brief periods of time (Baddeley & Hitch, 1974) is suggested to play a crucial role in children’s language acquisition in native and ... [more ▼]

Working memory, the capacity to store and manipulate information over brief periods of time (Baddeley & Hitch, 1974) is suggested to play a crucial role in children’s language acquisition in native and foreign languages (e.g. Gathercole, 2006; Service, 1992). The present study investigated children’s working memory skills and vocabulary knowledge in their native and secondary languages in the context of immigration. Twenty Portuguese immigrant children growing up in Luxembourg, who speak Portuguese at home, and acquire Luxembourgish in a natural setting and German through scholastic instruction, participated in the study. Children were assessed on measures of phonological short-term memory (digit recall and nonword repetition) and complex working memory (counting recall and backwards digit recall) in both Luxembourgish and Portuguese, on vocabulary knowledge (Portuguese, Luxembourgish, and German) and on comprehension (Luxembourgish and German). The children were compared to three groups of monolingual children: 20 Luxembourgish speakers living in Luxembourg and 40 Portuguese speakers from Brazil growing up in families of high (N=20) and low (N=20) socio economical status (SES). Groups were matched on age (7 years), nonverbal ability and gender. In the Portuguese immigrant children, language competences in Portuguese, Luxembourgish, and German were at an equivalent level that fell below the linguistic competence of native speakers from Brazil and from Luxembourg. The 4 groups did not differ on two of the four working memory measures. On one of the complex working memory tasks (counting recall) the low SES group from Brazil manifested scores that fell below the three other groups. Finally, the Portuguese immigrant children performed equally well to their Brazilian counterparts in the repetition of the Portuguese sounding nonwords, whereas their performance in the repetition of the Luxembourgish nonwords fell below that of the native Luxembourgish speakers. These results are consistent with findings that phonological short-term memory performance is better for familiar rather than unfamiliar lexical material (Gathercole, 1995). As the Portuguese immigrant children and their monolingual peers from Luxembourg and Brazil performed at comparable levels on the working memory measures, their poor language performances in all three languages is unlikely to be related to a fundamental cognitive deficit. Their even lower knowledge of Portuguese, vocabulary than children from impoverished backgrounds in Brazil also rules out the hypothesis that their poor language skills are simply a reflection of lower socio-economical status. Instead, the findings appear to be a direct consequence of growing up as an immigrant in a multilingual society. [less ▲]

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See detailEstimation in Engineering Design
Adolphy, Sebastian; Gericke, Kilian UL; Blessing, Lucienne UL

Poster (2008)

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See detailUsing the LLTM to determine an item-generating system for reading comprehension
Sonnleitner, Philipp UL

Poster (2008)

Due to inconclusive findings concerning the components responsible for the difficulty of reading comprehension items, this paper attempts to set up an item-generating system using hypothesis-driven ... [more ▼]

Due to inconclusive findings concerning the components responsible for the difficulty of reading comprehension items, this paper attempts to set up an item-generating system using hypothesis-driven modeling of item complexity applying Fischer’s (1973) linear logistic test model (LLTM) to a German reading comprehension test. This approach guarantees an evaluation of the postulated item-generating system; moreover construct validity of the administered test is investigated. Previous findings in this field are considered; additionally, some text features are introduced to this debate and their impact on item difficulty is discussed. Results once more show a strong influence of formal components (e.g. the number of presented response options in a multiple-choice-format), but also indicate how this effect can be minimized. [less ▲]

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See detailA FRAMEWORK TO UNDERSTAND PROJECT ROBUSTNESS
Gericke, Kilian UL; Blessing, Lucienne UL

Poster (2008)

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See detailThe evaluation of an educational system toward its monitoring and piloting
Houssemand, Claude UL; Wanlin, P

Poster (2007, September)

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See detailTime variable gravity field recovery in local areas by means of Slepian functions
Weigelt, Matthias UL; van der Wal, W.; Sneeuw, N. et al

Poster (2007, July)

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See detailThe use of strategies in motor learning: Validation of a new questionnaire.
Bund, Andreas UL; Wiemeyer, Josef

Poster (2007, June)

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See detailThe spatio-temporal correlates of holistic face perception
Schiltz, Christine UL; Jacques, Corentin; Rossion, Bruno

Poster (2007, May)

It is well known that faces are perceived holistically: their parts are integrated into a global or so-called holistic individual representation. Here we clarify where and how early in time individual ... [more ▼]

It is well known that faces are perceived holistically: their parts are integrated into a global or so-called holistic individual representation. Here we clarify where and how early in time individual holistic representations are extracted from the visual stimulus, by means of an event-related identity adaptation paradigm in fMRI (study 1; 10 subjects) and ERPs (study 2; 16 subjects). During blocks, subjects were presented with trials made of two sequentially presented faces and performed a same/different judgement on the top parts of each pair of faces. Face parts were presented either aligned or misaligned. For each face pair, the identity of top and bottom parts could be (a) both identical, (b) both different, (c) different only for the bottom part. The latter manipulation resulted in a strong face composite illusion behaviourally, i.e. the perception of identical top parts as being different, only in the aligned format. In the face-sensitive area of the middle fusiform gyrus (‘fusiform face area’) we observed a stronger response to the top part perceived as being different (release from adaptation), but only when the top and the bottom parts were aligned. It is consistent with the illusion of viewing different top parts of faces, and this release from fMR-adaptation is similar to the one observed in the ‘different’ condition for both aligned and misaligned parts. The same observations were made in ERPs as early as 150 ms, the amplitude of the electrophysiological response at occipito-temporal sites to the second face stimulus being reduced for identical relative to different top face parts, and to identical top parts perceived as different (aligned - bottom different). With both methods, the effects were stronger in the right hemisphere. Altogether, these observations indicate that individual faces are perceived holistically as early as 150 ms in the occipito-temporal cortex. [less ▲]

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See detailFmri evidence for multiple face processing pathways in the human brain
Dricot, Laurence; Schiltz, Christine UL; Sorger, Bettina et al

Poster (2007, May)

Two regions in the occipito-temporal cortex respond more strongly to faces than to objects and are thought to be important for face perception: ‘the fusiform face area’ (‘FFA’) and the ‘occipital face ... [more ▼]

Two regions in the occipito-temporal cortex respond more strongly to faces than to objects and are thought to be important for face perception: ‘the fusiform face area’ (‘FFA’) and the ‘occipital face area’ (‘OFA’). Whether these areas responding preferentially to faces play a dominant or exclusive role in face processing or if sub-maximal responses in other areas of the ventral stream such as the lateral occipital complex (LOC) are also involved is currently debated. To clarify this issue, we tested a brain-damaged patient presenting a face-selective deficit, prosopagnosia, with functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). Using fMRI-adaptation, we found a dissociation between the coding of identity in the structurally intact ‘FFA’, which was impaired for faces but preserved for objects. This observation complements recent fMRI findings that the ‘FFA’ reflects averaging of heterogeneous highly selective neural populations for faces and objects, by showing here that the responses of these populations can be functionally independent. Most importantly, a larger response to different faces than repeated faces was found in the ventral part of the LOC both for normals and the patient, next to the right hemisphere lesion. Following prosopagnosia, areas that do not respond preferentially to faces such as the ventral part of the LOC (vLOC) may still be recruited to subtend residual individual face discrimination. Overall, these observations indicate that faces are processed through a network of visual areas in the human brain, with a subset of these areas responding preferentially to faces being critical for efficient face recognition. [less ▲]

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See detailInvestigation of featural versus configural processing of faces in the middle fusiform gyrus
Goffaux, Valerie; Sorger, Bettina; Schiltz, Christine UL et al

Poster (2007, May)

Inverting a face affects the processing of the vertical relations between features (e.g. eye height) more than the processing of horizontal relations (e.g. interocular distance) and of local features (e.g ... [more ▼]

Inverting a face affects the processing of the vertical relations between features (e.g. eye height) more than the processing of horizontal relations (e.g. interocular distance) and of local features (e.g. eye shape and surface). Inversion also decreases hemodynamic responses (HR) in face-sensitive regions in the middle fusiform gyrus (MFG), presumably because it reduces face distinctiveness and leads to larger adaptation. Here we tested the hypothesis that inversion affects the perception of vertical metric distances between features in the MFG. In the present fMRI study, twelve subjects were presented with short blocks of upright and inverted pairs composed either of identical faces (‘same’ condition), or of faces that differed at the level of ‘vertical’ relations, ‘horizontal’ relations, the shape of all inner feature (‘different’), or the shape of one single ‘feature’. In rMFG, smaller HR were observed for ‘same’ as compared to ‘different’ condition when faces were presented upright; due to HR adaptation. ‘Vertical’, ‘horizontal’ and ‘featural’ conditions led to HR close to ‘same’ condition. Inversion decreased HR in all conditions except the ‘same’ condition, thus replicating previous findings. The largest inversion-related decrements measured in rMFG were observed for vertical relations. In the left MFG, all conditions led to larger HR than the ‘same’ condition at upright. Inversion decreased HR in vertical and horizontal conditions only. These results suggest different roles of the MFG across hemispheres. rMFG may code ecological face differences, since release from adaptation was only observed for completely different faces in this region. Moreover, rMFG may be sensitive to face configuration as suggested by the generalised inversion-related HR decrease. In contrast, lMFG may code any kind of physical difference between faces irrespective of orientation, except for relational differences. [less ▲]

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See detailComputer assisted assessment of visuospatial working memory
Wantz, Marc UL; Martin, Romain UL; Hornung, Caroline UL et al

Poster (2007)

We present a new computer program that allows the assessment of visuospatial working memory (VSWM) in kindergarten children. The challenge for the assessment of VSWM in this age group is to present a test ... [more ▼]

We present a new computer program that allows the assessment of visuospatial working memory (VSWM) in kindergarten children. The challenge for the assessment of VSWM in this age group is to present a test design that is easily understandable for children and thus not too difficult while at the same time implying additional processing elements above the pure storage of positional information (according to the definition of Engle et al. 1999 that working memory combines an element of pure storage with processes of executive attention) The adopted test paradigm is based on a grid / no-grid paradigm for which a previous fMRI study with an adult population has shown that the memorization of positional information in a perceptively undifferentiated space (no-grid condition) requires additional attentional processes compared to the memorization of positional information in a perceptively structured space (grid condition). The setting of the test was adapted to children in Kindergarten. We used a tablet PC to administer the test. This procedure excludes that children fail because they can’t use the computer mouse in an appropriate way. The different items show a 4x4 grid where the eyes of a manikin appear on a dark background. Children are told that the positions of different manikins in a dark room have to be memorized. After a short period of time the eyes disappear again and up to four positions have to be memorized in this way. The test person then clicks in the grid where he believes that the different manikins are hidden. The setting allows measuring performance in terms of accuracy and time. First results with kindergarten children in Luxemburg will be presented showing the correlation of this VSWM task with other visuospatial and numerical tasks. [less ▲]

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See detailAggregation in Multi-Agent Systems and the Problem of Truth-Tracking
Pigozzi, Gabriella UL; Hartmann, Stephan

Poster (2007)

One of the major problems that artificial intelligence needs to tackle is the combination of different and potentially conflicting sources of information. Examples are multi-sensor fusion, database ... [more ▼]

One of the major problems that artificial intelligence needs to tackle is the combination of different and potentially conflicting sources of information. Examples are multi-sensor fusion, database integration and expert systems development. In this paper we are interested in the aggregation of propositional logic-based information, a problem recently addressed in the literature on information fusion. It has applications in multiagent systems that aim at aggregating the distributed agent-based knowledge into an (ideally) unique set of propositions. We consider a group of autonomous agents who individually hold a logically consistent set of propositions. Each set of propositions represents an agent's beliefs on issues on which the group has to make a collective decision. To make the collective decision, several aggregation procedures have been proposed in the literature. Assuming that all propositions in question are factually right or wrong, we ask how good belief fusion is as a truth tracker. Will it single out the true set of propositions? And how does information fusion compare with other aggregation procedures? We address these questions in a probabilistic framework and show that information fusion does especially well for agents with a middling competence of hitting the truth of an individual proposition. [less ▲]

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See detailTeacher aggression : A cross-cultural study.
Baudson, Tanja Gabriele UL; Stiensmeier-Pelster, J.; Fujihara, T.

Poster (2007)

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See detailCombination of CHAMP and GRACE data for Gravity Field Analysis
Weigelt, Matthias UL; Sideris, M. G.; Sneeuw, N.

Poster (2006, August)

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See detailSelf-controlled practice of decision-making skills
Bund, Andreas UL; Memmert, Daniel

Poster (2006, July)

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See detailUsability-lab and Intranet websites evaluation: methodological and organisational issues
Koenig, Vincent UL; van de Leemput, Cécile

Poster (2006, July)

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See detailEvaluation of an antagonistic model of self-controlled skill learning
Bund, Andreas UL; Ferwagner, Dirk

Poster (2006, July)

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See detailCombination of CHAMP and GRACE satellite data for Earth monitoring
Weigelt, Matthias UL; Sideris, M. G.; Sneeuw, N.

Poster (2006, June)

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See detailHigh-latitude local gravity field recovery from CHAMP with least-squares collocation
Weigelt, Matthias UL; Sideris, M. G.; Sneeuw, N.

Poster (2006, April)

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See detailA GPS Network Densification in Saudi Arabia in Support of Geophysical Investigations in the Region
Almuslmani, Bandar; Al-Motari, Eid; Bingley, Richard M. et al

Poster (2006)

Current investigations of the motions of the Arabian and its neighboring plates are primarily based on GPS measurements obtained in the surrounding areas of the Arabian plate, with few stations actually ... [more ▼]

Current investigations of the motions of the Arabian and its neighboring plates are primarily based on GPS measurements obtained in the surrounding areas of the Arabian plate, with few stations actually located on the Arabian plate itself in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia. In order to advance the knowledge of the dynamics of the Arabian plate and its intra-plate deformations, the General Directorate of Military Survey (GDMS), through a collaboration with the Institute of Engineering Surveying and Space Geodesy (IESSG), densified the GPS network in Saudi Arabia, covering nearly two thirds of the tectonic plate. Since July 2002, a network of 32 GPS stations has been established at locations of the Saudi Arabia geodetic network. At all of these GPS stations a concrete pillar has been used as the monument and the locations have been selected in order to give the broadest distribution of observing sites. During 2005, 27 additional GPS stations in the Hejaz and Asser Mountains in the south-western part of Saudi Arabia, have been established, with the GDMS GPS network now comprising a total of 59 stations. In this presentation we will introduce the new GPS network in Saudi Arabia established by GDMS and will present the initial results from campaigns in March 2003 and March 2005. We show preliminary estimates of absolute and relative Arabian plate motions inferred from the GPS network and a detailed comparison of the results based on the Bernese GPS software versions 4.2 and 5.0. [less ▲]

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See detailFormal Poisson cohomology of r-matrix induced quadratic structures
Masmoudi, Mohsen; Poncin, Norbert UL

Poster (2006)

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See detailExploring the Divide in the Digital Divide: The Effect of Race/Ethnicity on Computer Ownership in United States, 1984–2003
Rivas, Salvador UL

Poster (2005, April)

Previous studies that describe the existence and dimensions of the digital divide call attention to the potential negative consequences of not having access to a computer and not being online. Missing ... [more ▼]

Previous studies that describe the existence and dimensions of the digital divide call attention to the potential negative consequences of not having access to a computer and not being online. Missing from these studies, however, is a more thorough investigation of how the effect of race/ethnicity on computer ownership is mediated by associated factors and how these effects have changed across time. The current study attempts to fill these gaps. Using Current Population Survey data, from 1984 to 2003, I estimate a series of logistic regression models on computer ownership at the household level. After controlling for demographic, household composition, and socioeconomic variables, the gap between Black and Hispanic households in relation to White households remains statistically significant. For Asian households, the racial effect is explained by the variables in the models. The implications of these findings are discussed and suggestions are made for future research. [less ▲]

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See detailThe Effect of Processing Technique and Reference Frame Definition on Noise in CGPS Position Time Series
Teferle, Felix Norman UL; Williams, Simon; Kierulf, Halfdan et al

Poster (2005)

In this presentation we investigate the effects of GPS processing techniques and strategies, and the related reference frame realization, on the stochastic properties of continuous GPS (CGPS) position ... [more ▼]

In this presentation we investigate the effects of GPS processing techniques and strategies, and the related reference frame realization, on the stochastic properties of continuous GPS (CGPS) position time series. It was of particular interest to establish whether and how different GPS processing techniques and strategies, e.g. double differencing (DD) and precise point positioning (PPP), and the use of different orbit and clock products, and/or the definition of the reference frame (partly dependent on the applied strategy) affect the colored noise content of time series. We used CGPS position time series from 15 different solutions obtained from seven different analysis centers as part of the European Sea Level Service - Research Infrastructure project (ESEAS-RI) using the GIPSY OASIS II, GAMIT and Bernese GPS softwares. All time series analyzed have at least three years of data for the period between 2000 and 2005. Furthermore, a selected set of position time series was also analyzed using Empirical Orthogonal Function (EOF) analysis. The noise content of the first 15 modes, representing the solution-specific common mode time series for each of the selected solutions were then also investigated for colored noise. Using Maximum Likelihood Estimation (MLE) a white, a white plus flicker, a white plus power- law and a white plus first-order Gauss-Markov (FOGM) noise model were fitted to the position and EOF time series data. For both the position and EOF time series the parameter model included a constant, a rate and harmonic terms with annual, semi-annual, 4- monthly, 3-monthly, 2.4-monthly and 13.66 day periods. Position jumps were modeled at logged epochs or at visible discontinuities in the time series. The MLE showed that in most cases the best fitting noise model is a combination of white plus power-law noise with average spectral indices in the range between -0.5 and -1.4. This model is closely followed by the combination of white plus flicker and white plus FOGM noise. The noise properties of the EOF time series follow predominantly a white plus power-law character, with the first few modes indicating a white plus flicker noise behavior. In general, DD solutions contain less noise than PPP solutions and that regional reference frame definitions further reduce the amount of noise in the time series. [less ▲]

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See detailFace-sensitive responses in the occipital inferior cortex of normal humans through feedback inputs from the fusiform gyrus? Evidence from neuroimaging studies of brain-damaged prosopagnosic patient
Rossion, Bruno; Sorger, Bettina; Schiltz, Christine UL et al

Poster (2004, August 13)

In humans, neuroimaging studies have identified two major visual extrastriate areas presenting face-sensitive responses: in the inferior occipital cortex (‘occipital face area’, OFA), and the middle ... [more ▼]

In humans, neuroimaging studies have identified two major visual extrastriate areas presenting face-sensitive responses: in the inferior occipital cortex (‘occipital face area’, OFA), and the middle fusiform gyrus (the ‘fusiform face area’, FFA), with a right hemispheric dominance. It has been proposed that the OFA, located anteriorly to foveal V4v (Halgren et al., 1999), has a critical role in the early perception of facial features and provides the feedforward outputs to later stages of face processing in both the FFA and the STS (Haxby et al., 2000). However, we have recently reported a normal activation of the right FFA despite a lesion encompassing the region of the right OFA in a brain-damaged prosopagnosic patient, PS (Rossion et al., 2003), suggesting that the face-sensitive responses observed at the level of the OFA in normals may rather arise from feedback connections from the FFA. Here we provide complementary fMRI evidence supporting this view. First, the normal differential activation for faces and objects in the right FFA of PS was observed only for left visual field presentations and is thus unlikely to originate from contralateral intact regions of the occipital cortex (e.g. left OFA). Second, the time-course in the right FFA and left OFA of PS for centrally presented items suggests an earlier differential activity between faces and objects in the most anterior region, the FFA. Finally, we imaged another (prosop)agnosic patient (NS, Delvenne et al., 2004) with a lesion encompassing the right FFA but sparing all posterior visual areas, and failed to disclose any face-sensitive response in his nonetheless structurally and functionnally intact occipital cortex. Together, these findings illustrate the necessary role of both the right FFA and OFA for accurate face perception, and reinforce the hypothesis that a dominant (feedback) connection from the FFA to the OFA subtends face-sensitive responses observed in the latter area when processing faces. [less ▲]

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See detailFace-sensitive responses in the occipital inferior cortex of normal humans through feedback inputs from the fusiform gyrus ?: Evidence from neuroimaging studies of brain-damaged prosopagnosic patients
Schiltz, Christine UL; Caldara, Roberto; Sorger, Bettina et al

Poster (2004, June)

In humans, neuroimaging studies have identified two major visual extrastriate areas presenting face-sensitive responses: in the inferior occipital cortex (‘occipital face area’, OFA), and the middle ... [more ▼]

In humans, neuroimaging studies have identified two major visual extrastriate areas presenting face-sensitive responses: in the inferior occipital cortex (‘occipital face area’, OFA), and the middle fusiform gyrus (the ‘fusiform face area’, FFA), with a right hemispheric dominance. It has been proposed that the OFA, located anteriorly to foveal V4v (Halgren et al., 1999), has a critical role in the early perception of facial features and provides the feedforward outputs to later stages of face processing in both the FFA and the STS (Haxby et al., 2000). However, we have recently reported a normal activation of the right FFA despite a lesion encompassing the region of the right OFA in a brain-damaged prosopagnosic patient, PS (Rossion et al., 2003), suggesting that the face-sensitive responses observed at the level of the OFA in normals may rather arise from feedback connections from the FFA. Here we provide complementary fMRI evidence supporting this view. First, the normal differential activation for faces and objects in the right FFA of PS was observed only for left visual field presentations and is thus unlikely to originate from contralateral intact regions of the occipital cortex (e.g. left OFA). Second, the time-course in the right FFA and left OFA of PS for centrally presented items suggests an earlier differential activity between faces and objects in the most anterior region, the FFA. Finally, we imaged another (prosop)agnosic patient (NS, Delvenne et al., 2004) with a lesion encompassing the right FFA but sparing all posterior visual areas, and failed to disclose any face-sensitive response in his nonetheless structurally and functionnally intact occipital cortex. Together, these findings illustrate the necessary role of both the right FFA and OFA for accurate face perception, and reinforce the hypothesis that a dominant (feedback) connection from the FFA to the OFA subtends face-sensitive responses observed in the latter area when processing faces. [less ▲]

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See detailPerceived positive gain and its effect on the illness-parenting stress relationship
Pit-Ten Cate, Ineke UL; Stevenson, J

Poster (2004, April)

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See detailSport in Schule und Freizeit: Gibt es Synergieeffekte? Eine qualitative Befragung von Jugendlichen.
Bund, Andreas UL; Hönmann, Johanna; Berner, Birgit

Poster (2003, May)

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See detailAufmerksamkeitsfokus beim Bewegungslernen
Bund, Andreas UL; Gass, Svenja; Weidenauer, Jörg

Poster (2002, February)

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See detailWas möchten Bewegungslernende selbst bestimmen?
Bund, Andreas UL

Poster (2002, February)

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See detailThe relationship between body image and psychosocial adjustment in adolescents with spina bifida
Fulcher, A.B:; Pit-Ten Cate, Ineke UL; Stevenson, Jim

Poster (2001, September)

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See detailAge-related differences in inhibition and working memory capacity: a test of the May, Hasher and Kane hypothesis.
Reichert, Monique UL; Süß, Heinz-Martin; Sander, Nicolas

Poster (2001, July 11)

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See detailL’idée de citoyenneté : De quoi parle-t-on ?
Meyers, Christian UL

Poster (2001, January 31)

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See detailWhat can Evaluative Learning tell us about Implicit Learning?
Reuter, Robert UL; Cleeremans, Axel

Poster (2000, September)

Detailed reference viewed: 37 (2 UL)
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See detailDoes nicotine deprivation affect attentional performance?
Mancuso, Giovanna UL

Poster (2000)

Detailed reference viewed: 19 (0 UL)
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See detailThe neural basis of human face categorization: A parametric pet study
Rossion, B; Schiltz, Christine UL; Robaye, L et al

Poster (1999, June)

Detailed reference viewed: 27 (1 UL)
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See detailSpecific activation related to proper name retrieval associated with faces
Dubois, S; Rossion, B; Schiltz, Christine UL et al

Poster (1997, October)

Detailed reference viewed: 32 (1 UL)
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See detailVoluntary saccadic eye movements: Effect of task repetition. A pet study
Dejardin, S; Dubois, S; Bodart, J.-M et al

Poster (1996, November)

Detailed reference viewed: 35 (1 UL)
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See detailOrientation-specific training effect in visual orientation discrimination, a pet study
Schiltz, Christine UL; Bodart, J.-M; Dubois, S et al

Poster (1996)

Detailed reference viewed: 27 (1 UL)
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See detailVisual orientation discrimination: Effect of training on brain activity, a pet study
Schiltz, Christine UL; Dubois, S; Bodart, J.-M et al

Poster (1995, November)

Detailed reference viewed: 30 (1 UL)
See detailPsychophysical asesment of pain induced by CO2 pulses appled to the nasal mucosa
Anton, Fernand UL; Euchner, Ingrid; Handwerker, Hermann-Otto

Poster (1990)

Detailed reference viewed: 31 (0 UL)
See detailInfluence of vascular tone on pain induced by skin cooling
Anton, Fernand UL; Gilly, Hermann; Kreh, Albrecht et al

Poster (1982)

Detailed reference viewed: 63 (2 UL)